Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

I don't know why this engine runs hot?

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • I don't know why this engine runs hot?

    It always has plenty of water!

    Matt
    Brisbane
    Australia
    sigpic

    Visit my Blog: http://www.mattsoilyrag.blogspot.com.au/

  • #2
    To bad iron oxide deposits aren't in your precious metal portfolio, you could retire today.
    Bill Foy
    1000 Islands, Ontario
    1953 Starlight Coupe

    Comment


    • #3
      If you could keep the water from running out of that huge hole in the side of the block, it "might" run a little cooler...

      Comment


      • #4
        WOW!!!!!!!

        Comment


        • #5
          I like this "Cutaway" view. It demonstrates more than mere trash leading to poor cooling system performance. Just as I have posted in other threads, through the years, all components of a cooling system can be summed up by thinking in terms of "Heat Exchange Efficiency." One hidden problem, is contamination that interferes with heat transfer. While we have often discussed "core sand" deposits, core wire remnants, remaining in the engines from the foundry, other chemical processes are churning away inside the cast-iron passages. In our cooling systems, cast iron, water, and copper, combine to make excellent conductors of heat. Therefore, in a new engine, the heat carried away from the cylinder walls is very efficient. Even if there is no loose debris, like core sand, or pieces of wire, in the coolant passages, the accumulation of rust, and lime deposits will, over time, inhibit the heat exchange rate.

          I would like to see someone come up with some type of "media," that could be used to clean the interior walls of the water jackets. Something that could stay intact long enough to clean off the deposits, and be flushed out, leaving the engine block clean and unobstructed. We have discussed removing the core plugs, jamming a brush/coat hanger wire/ and other labor intensive efforts to accomplish the task. Wouldn't it be great, if there were some kind of media, we could pump through, circulate, with the cutting characteristics of blast media, and then be dissolved with a chemical agent, and flushed out?

          Even if you have a cooling system with sufficient unobstructed water flow, lime and rust deposits in your water jackets, and radiator, can inhibit heat exchange enough to cause an engine to run hot.
          John Clary
          Greer, SC

          SDC member since 1975

          Comment


          • #6
            Excellent, Matt; thanks for the photo. It proves so many things. BP
            We've got to quit saying, "How stupid can you be?" Too many people are taking it as a challenge.

            Ayn Rand:
            "You can avoid reality, but you cannot avoid the consequences of avoiding reality."

            G. K. Chesterton: This triangle of truisms, of father, mother, and child, cannot be destroyed; it can only destroy those civilizations which disregard it.

            Comment


            • #7
              The junkyard engines I get are more often than not full of sludge in both the oiling system and the water system. One theory is by the 1960s, Studebakers and Packards were orphan cars of little value and thus were sold down to the beater market, often for $100 or less. The bottom feeders only wanting the cheapest transportation seldom-to-never changed the oil and never looked under the radiator cap. They were driven until they died and then scrapped out.

              But yes, left-behind casting core sand is real. I've seen more of it in Studebaker V8s than any BrandXs.

              jack vines
              PackardV8

              Comment


              • #8
                At my job in the auto shop in the 80's, one of my jobs was hot tanking engine blocks, heads and various parts. Hot tanking did an excellent job of removing all that junk, and when the solution needed to be changed we just added a neutralizer and dumped it down the drain. It's nonsense that EPA has put so many hot tanks out of business. It's a lye solution, if you want to do your own hot tank. Oven cleaner with sodium hydroxide will do the same job or removing paint and rust.

                Comment


                • #9
                  Originally posted by jclary View Post
                  I would like to see someone come up with some type of "media," that could be used to clean the interior walls of the water jackets. Something that could stay intact long enough to clean off the deposits, and be flushed out, leaving the engine block clean and unobstructed. We have discussed removing the core plugs, jamming a brush/coat hanger wire/ and other labor intensive efforts to accomplish the task. Wouldn't it be great, if there were some kind of media, we could pump through, circulate, with the cutting characteristics of blast media, and then be dissolved with a chemical agent, and flushed out?
                  It would be interesting to see if this could be adapted to automotive applications. It would sure beat having to pull and engine and having to strip it all the way down before sending it to be boiled out.

                  https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ouCM4fHdJ5Y
                  Mike O'Handley, Cat Herder Third Class
                  Kenmore, Washington
                  hausdok@msn.com

                  '58 Packard Hawk
                  '05 Subaru Baja Turbo
                  '71 Toyota Crown Coupe
                  '69 Pontiac Firebird
                  (What is it with me and discontinued/orphan cars?)

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    As some of you know I own an industrial water treatment company, specializing in control of scale, corrosion and biological fouling in steam boilers and cooling towers. We also manufacture water recycling products and systems, plus chemically clean heat exchangers etc. Treating automotive cooling systems is no mean feat, with their wide range of metals and temperatures. Cleaning them chemically, (successfully), is even more difficult. The main two minerals that are an engine’s enemy are calcium and magnesium bicarbonate, (as they are for any heat exchange device). Every 1/8” of scale will retard heat exchange by 15% concurring. Most acids, (Hydrochloric / sulphamic / citric), will dissolve the magnesium and calcium deposits at varying speeds, they will do nothing to dissolve left over casting sand. The hot caustic baths mentioned earlier will remove oils and greases, but not mineral deposits and vice versa. To chemically clean an assembled engine in a car can be done, ( the radiator done separately), a good margin of success can be attained, with time and tenacity. Also countering the residual acid with a neutralizing alkaline product after – being very cautious with any yellow metals as they suffer attack from alkalis. We have developed a non-acid, non-alkali product for cleaning multi-metal systems, which also passivates the parent / underlying metal, negating the need to neutralise after the clean. Unfortunately shipping it to the USA would be cost prohibitive. If anyone wants to discuss any water issues in detail drop me a line. I wish there was some magic product that makes it easier ! But physics and chemistry cannot be cheated ;-)
                    Matt
                    Brisbane
                    Australia
                    sigpic

                    Visit my Blog: http://www.mattsoilyrag.blogspot.com.au/

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Matt - had a quick Australia/car question. Considering the climate, how many vehicles 50+ years ago ran coolant that included a sizeable amount of antifreeze? I lived in South Australia for a year and remember only a few days when the temp went below freezing - and the remaining 3/4 of the continent is north of that...

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Originally posted by 62champ View Post
                        Matt - had a quick Australia/car question. Considering the climate, how many vehicles 50+ years ago ran coolant that included a sizeable amount of antifreeze? I lived in South Australia for a year and remember only a few days when the temp went below freezing - and the remaining 3/4 of the continent is north of that...
                        Hey Patrick,
                        From my memory from when I was a kid very few cars used anything other that tap water. The commercially available glycol based coolant treatment handles the colder climes easily, it's main job is to stop boiling. I've never heard of a block splitting from freezing down here.
                        Matt
                        Brisbane
                        Australia
                        sigpic

                        Visit my Blog: http://www.mattsoilyrag.blogspot.com.au/

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Originally posted by jclary View Post
                          I like this "Cutaway" view. It demonstrates more than mere trash leading to poor cooling system performance. Just as I have posted in other threads, through the years, all components of a cooling system can be summed up by thinking in terms of "Heat Exchange Efficiency." One hidden problem, is contamination that interferes with heat transfer. While we have often discussed "core sand" deposits, core wire remnants, remaining in the engines from the foundry, other chemical processes are churning away inside the cast-iron passages. In our cooling systems, cast iron, water, and copper, combine to make excellent conductors of heat. Therefore, in a new engine, the heat carried away from the cylinder walls is very efficient. Even if there is no loose debris, like core sand, or pieces of wire, in the coolant passages, the accumulation of rust, and lime deposits will, over time, inhibit the heat exchange rate.

                          I would like to see someone come up with some type of "media," that could be used to clean the interior walls of the water jackets. Something that could stay intact long enough to clean off the deposits, and be flushed out, leaving the engine block clean and unobstructed. We have discussed removing the core plugs, jamming a brush/coat hanger wire/ and other labor intensive efforts to accomplish the task. Wouldn't it be great, if there were some kind of media, we could pump through, circulate, with the cutting characteristics of blast media, and then be dissolved with a chemical agent, and flushed out?

                          Even if you have a cooling system with sufficient unobstructed water flow, lime and rust deposits in your water jackets, and radiator, can inhibit heat exchange enough to cause an engine to run hot.
                          Remember the old Dupont product that came is a silver 2-part can~? I don't know what that stuff was but it really worked amazingly well. It must have been something very caustic because the 2nd can was a 'neutralizer which was used after the flush and thorough rinse.

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Originally posted by colt45sa View Post
                            Remember the old Dupont product that came is a silver 2-part can~? I don't know what that stuff was but it really worked amazingly well. It must have been something very caustic because the 2nd can was a 'neutralizer which was used after the flush and thorough rinse.
                            You can bet the EPA has dumbed it down to the point a child can drink it and not get hurt. The last time I tried cooling system cleaner, it did nothing. Evaporust would have helped the engine block shown in the first picture.

                            Comment

                            Working...
                            X