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  • Hinge Repair Service

    Anyone know of a c/k hinge repair service?...I don't have the tools nor the skills myself
    Lou Van Anne
    62 Champ
    64 R2 GT Hawk
    79 Avanti II

  • #2
    Almost any body shop should be able to take care of it. If worn to bad the pin can be drilled and the closest fit bushing kit put in it.

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    • #3
      Phil Harris had repaired hinges on the past, but I don't know if he still does.

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      • #4
        I did several hinge repairs while I was working in a hot rod shop, early fords seemed to wear out. They consist of 2 bushings, a replacement pin and some kits come with the proper drill bit. I'm sure a hot rod/ custom shop can fix it without too much drama. You just have to be able to readjust the door after it's been repaired.

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        • #5
          Sorry, forgot to specify deck lid hinge.
          Originally posted by Bill A View Post
          I did several hinge repairs while I was working in a hot rod shop, early fords seemed to wear out. They consist of 2 bushings, a replacement pin and some kits come with the proper drill bit. I'm sure a hot rod/ custom shop can fix it without too much drama. You just have to be able to readjust the door after it's been repaired.
          Lou Van Anne
          62 Champ
          64 R2 GT Hawk
          79 Avanti II

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          • #6
            I haven't seen any trunk hinges with issues, they just don't get used as much but a repair should still be doable. Where are the springs located.

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            • #7
              Trunk hinges wear badly because there are some mean forces exerted upon some quite small pins. Your trunk lid is a lever arm nearly 4 feet long, pivoted on a parallelogram arrangement with lever arms 2 or 3 inches long. There are some fiercely strong springs on those hinges to counterbalance the substantial weight of the trunk lid. The pivot holes oval out, and they don't have to oval out very much to put the hinge in a bind position, and then the trunk lid bends when you go to close it.
              Gord Richmond, within Weasel range of the Alberta Badlands

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              • #8
                I got refurbished hinges from Bob Helm out of Texas, but sadly he is no longer with us. I do not know if anyone else has taken up that task. When I got mine I was told that lubrication is the the key to longevity on these hinges. I use spray white lithium grease on a regular basis.
                Pat Dilling
                Olivehurst, CA
                Custom '53 Starlight aka STU COOL


                LS1 Engine Swap Journal: http://www.hotrodders.com/forum/jour...ournalid=33611

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by gordr View Post
                  Trunk hinges wear badly because there are some mean forces exerted upon some quite small pins. Your trunk lid is a lever arm nearly 4 feet long, pivoted on a parallelogram arrangement with lever arms 2 or 3 inches long. There are some fiercely strong springs on those hinges to counterbalance the substantial weight of the trunk lid. The pivot holes oval out, and they don't have to oval out very much to put the hinge in a bind position, and then the trunk lid bends when you go to close it.
                  Spot on contribution to this thread! I have dealt with all types of hinges and observe that the trunk hinges are some of the most complex, precise engineered parts on a Studebaker. Since early childhood, I have always been fascinated by how things are made and put together. Due to my aversion to numbers and mathematical challenges, I will never make a claim to being a true "engineer."

                  Lacking that precise understanding...at best, I'm just an engineer "wannabe." But, when you study the action of a trunk hinge, not only do they have to swing up, but out, over, and park. Each hinge, has to perform this task, coordinated in pairs. Not only doing this while "opening," but closing while keeping symmetrical alignment. Much engineering mimics things found in nature. For these trunk hinges, I think of the skeletal construction of bird wings. An amazing engineering feat with neat compact storage, fantastic extension, reliability, and repeat ability.
                  John Clary
                  Greer, SC

                  SDC member since 1975

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                  • #10
                    OK, on that note imagine the weight of a typical trunk lid, it is a formed skin attached to a engineered framework that is basically skeletal. A front door has both inner and outer skins with lacking as well as window articulation hardware in them along with whatever was or has been installed. I have installed a number of trunk lids and by comparison they arn't that heavy but it is typical to use a lifting device to set a front door. If the pin is the weak link then oversizing the hole and installing a sleeve would increase the contact area by volumes diminishing the wear to near none. Just a thought.

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                    • #11
                      Some great comments, but no answers!
                      I need my trunk hinges on my '51 coupe repaired also.

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                      • #12
                        Don't know where Temple City is but Bing found Eddy's Rod Shop at 4700 Miller Dr. 1-626-452-1177. Says he is in Temple City. Give him a call and see what his thoughts are.

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                        • #13
                          Originally posted by JohnMSeymour View Post
                          Some great comments, but no answers!
                          Well guys, a retired gentleman in Ohio, a former Toll & Die guy, saw this posting and emailed me today. He wants to try and fix them and has the tools in his garage. However, he requested that I not advertise his name as he is not looking for additional work at this time. He is a Studebaker owner. I will honor his request, sorry. (I have agreed to give him $75 plus material costs for each hinge...do think that is fair?)
                          Lou Van Anne
                          62 Champ
                          64 R2 GT Hawk
                          79 Avanti II

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                          • #14
                            If it's what he asked for it's a fair price, that's how custom works. Share pictures of what he did to fix them, it's always interesting to see how folks do their work.

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                            • #15
                              I'd like to see pix of what is wrong with the old hinges. I have yet to experience, or even see a worn out C/K trunk hinge.

                              I believe C/K car owners consistently lift their trunks with favored hand, and that practice eventually pulls the trunk toward the favored side, often far enough to close the 1/8" to 1/4" side gap, while opening the gap on the other side. For example, I am left handed so lift mine with left hand, gripping left side of the trunk edge. On all three of my Hawks (56J, 62GT and 63GT) the crack on the left side is closer than the right side. I bet if I spent the next five years lifting with the right hand, the crack would reverse to closer on the right and farther on the left.

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