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  • oil can spout

    I was trying to straighten some things in my shop and toolbox. One of the items in the bottom of the toolbox (that is, the toolbox I inherited from my grandfather who died in 1950), is a plastic spout to push into an oil can. I think I bought this in the 1960's. I also think they discontinued oil in quart cans in the 1980's, so the spout has not had a purpose in a long time - and it won't have one in the future. I'm sure my grandchildren would have no idea what to do with it. I'd be happy to send it to a collector. Who wants it? You can claim it at Warwick, if you'll be there.

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    Gary Ash
    Dartmouth, Mass.

    '32 Indy car replica (in progress)
    ’41 Commander Land Cruiser
    '48 M5
    '65 Wagonaire Commander
    '63 Wagonaire Standard
    web site at http://www.studegarage.com

  • #2
    I started driving and doing maintenance on cars while these were still in use (although I never used a plastic one). In all the years, did they ever make 'em so they weren't a mess, either during use or after???
    KURTRUK
    (read it backwards)




    Nothing is politically right which is morally wrong. -A. Lincoln

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    • #3
      Originally posted by kurtruk View Post
      I started driving and doing maintenance on cars while these were still in use (although I never used a plastic one). In all the years, did they ever make 'em so they weren't a mess, either during use or after???
      I never saw a plastic one. I still have a steel one. It has a thick, soft gasket around the part that contacts the can so I have never noticed a problem mess. I still have a case of full steel oil cans that I got out of a basement when I bought an old shop. Maybe someday I'll need the spout.
      Paul Johnson, Wild and Wonderful West Virginia.
      '64 Daytona Wagonaire, '64 Avanti R-1, Museum R-4 engine, '72 Gravely Model 430 with Onan engine

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      • #4
        I inherited( and most likely still have) a red plastic one that did leak/spill.
        Has a round flat that covers the entire top of the can, straight round spout, and a little cap
        so's you can cover a partly used quart.

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        • #5
          I remember opening an oil can with the same opener as my Schlitz beer can.....mmmmm...

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          • #6
            I have a few of those spouts laying around some where in the garage and shed. Left over from my Sinclair days. Also have a metal rack for stacking opened cans upside down to drain the residule oil from the cans. It's amazing how much oil you could collect from the "empty" cans!
            sigpic1957 Packard Clipper Country Sedan

            "There's nothing stronger than the heart of a volunteer"
            Lt. Col. Jimmy Doolittle
            "I have a great memory for forgetting things" Number 1 son, Lee Chan

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            • #7
              I'am sure some collector would want it. I went to a auction a few years ago and couldn't believe what collectors where paying for old steel oil cans with no oil in them. Told the guy I went there with that I threw away millions of dollars worth when I was 16-17 and worked at a 66 gas station. Guess I should have saved a truck load or two.

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              • #8
                DAMN Gary! You are making me feel old!!! My oil spout is made of metal! I have not used it in many years since the "invention" of the plastic bottle!

                Jim
                "We can't all be Heroes, Some us just need to stand on the curb and clap as they go by" Will Rogers

                We will provide the curb for you to stand on and clap!


                Indy Honor Flight www.IndyHonorFlight.org

                As of Veterans Day 2017, IHF has flown 2,450 WWII, Korean, and Vietnam Veterans to Washington DC at NO charge! to see
                their Memorials!

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                • #9
                  I was working at a Texaco for about 1 1/2 years when the cans of oil where getting phased out. I was thinking I should keep some of this old cans (metal top and bottom with a cardboard side), but to a kid it was pricey to buy and just hold onto them. I still have a metal one from my Grandfather that has the gasket....never leaked or spilled a drop.

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                  • #10
                    Hang on to it, this guy may need it to get that original Special Stude Oil out of the can..

                    IMG_4607 by s blazel, on Flickr

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                    • #11
                      We have a few oil spouts around here. All are chrome steel. I have wondered sometimes whether to keep them or not.
                      "In the heart of Arkansas."
                      Searcy, Arkansas
                      1952 Commander 2 door. Really fine 259.
                      1952 2R pickup

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                      • #12
                        If you didn't push down just right on the oil cans with cardboard sides the side would collapse. The all metal cans were much sturdier. I can also remember filling the glass jars with the metal funnel top with bulk oil when I worked at gas stations. Having the oil in outside racks by the pumps in the winter was not the thing to do. It could take up to 15 mins or more to get a quart of oil in the customers car depending on how far the temperature was below freezing. Straight 30 & 40 weight oil flow like grease in cold temperatures.

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                        • #13
                          I also remember keeping a half dozen cans of STP on the top of the office radiator during the winter.
                          sigpic1957 Packard Clipper Country Sedan

                          "There's nothing stronger than the heart of a volunteer"
                          Lt. Col. Jimmy Doolittle
                          "I have a great memory for forgetting things" Number 1 son, Lee Chan

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                          • #14
                            Could always keep it and use it to open cans of Tomato Juice--or some other liquid canned goods. Till they disappear.

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                            • #15
                              Originally posted by Mikado282 View Post
                              If you didn't push down just right on the oil cans with cardboard sides the side would collapse. The all metal cans were much sturdier. I can also remember filling the glass jars with the metal funnel top with bulk oil when I worked at gas stations. Having the oil in outside racks by the pumps in the winter was not the thing to do. It could take up to 15 mins or more to get a quart of oil in the customers car depending on how far the temperature was below freezing. Straight 30 & 40 weight oil flow like grease in cold temperatures.
                              Yep, the cardboard cans could get a bit messy if your spout wasn't good and sharp. In the shop where I worked, the rule was to always puncture the can (with the spout) in view of the customer so they knew exactly what was in the can. Some unscrupulous shops would re-fill the cans with bulk (or used) oil and sell it at the price of the can.
                              Jim Bradley
                              Lake Monticello, VA
                              '78 Avanti II
                              sigpic

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