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Photo Request, V8 Oil Pan

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  • Photo Request, V8 Oil Pan

    Anyone have a photo they could post that shows what the bottom of a V8 oil pan is supposed to look like? Mine appears to have been used as jacking point in its past life. I cleaned it all up last night and was going to do a little hammer and dolly work on it. Once I got the hammer in my hand couldn't decide what the original contour was supposed to be.

    Thanks
    Wayne
    Wayne
    "Trying to shed my CASO ways"

    sigpic

  • #2
    Here you go Wayne, from a '62 V8. Wasn't sure what year you wanted, I do have an early 6 quart pan from around '55, but would have to dig that out. Click on them to enlarge. I had the pan out because I was getting ready to clean/prime it.

    If you need more, let me know. Us North Carolina guys need to stick together .
    Click image for larger version

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    Paul
    Winston-Salem, NC
    Visit The Studebaker Skytop Registry website at: www.studebakerskytop.com

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    • #3
      Please note, there is another thread on the site that depicts the CORRECT dents, and the INCORRECT dents. There is SUPPOSED to be one dent near the narrow end of the pan in order to clear the steering mechanism I believe. It is a uniform dent, just as it comes over the front rolled edge. It should be about 4" wide and 2" long.

      All the other dents, in the bottom of the pan, and the middle of the pan are incorrect. Those need to be straightened. I just got done doing what you are planning.

      Click image for larger version

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      If you look at the attached pic, the CORRECT dent is the one on the far left. The one just to the right of that is incorrect. My pan was used as a jacking point a lot apparently.

      Also, don't forget to flatten the bolt holes on the sealing surfaces so the pan will seal BETWEEN the holes. I used a small hammer and a dolly. Also do that with the valve cover tops as well. I used a deep well socket on those.
      Dis-Use on a Car is Worse Than Mis-Use...
      1959 Studebaker Lark VIII 2DHTP

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      • #4
        Thanks guys. My pan was definitely used as a jacking point. It certainly doesn't have those nice rounded corners like Paul's photo shows. Mine is pretty flat across the bottom. They must have put a block of wood on the jack before they lifted the car by the oil pan. I guess I will spend a little quality time with the hammer and dolly tonight.
        Wayne
        "Trying to shed my CASO ways"

        sigpic

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        • #5
          Originally posted by wdills View Post
          Thanks guys. My pan was definitely used as a jacking point. It certainly doesn't have those nice rounded corners like Paul's photo shows. Mine is pretty flat across the bottom. They must have put a block of wood on the jack before they lifted the car by the oil pan. I guess I will spend a little quality time with the hammer and dolly tonight.
          Yep probably did, mine looks like it was stepped on by an elephant. It usually get squashed trying to install engine mounts as finding a suitable point to lift the engine from underneath doesn't exist.

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          • #6
            Originally posted by karterfred88 View Post
            It usually get squashed trying to install engine mounts as finding a suitable point to lift the engine from underneath doesn't exist.
            Make a simple U-shaped (actually not U-shaped since the bottom is flat and the 'corners' are 90 degs) fixture out of 2x4 wood like is pictured in the Shop Manual. It will support the engine on the pan rails, and allow you to take the weight off the engine without damaging the pan.

            Thought I had a picture of it in use, but couldn't find it.
            Paul
            Winston-Salem, NC
            Visit The Studebaker Skytop Registry website at: www.studebakerskytop.com

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            • #7
              Anyone with two EYES can see that a Stude. V8 is WAY too heavy to be lifted by a piece of sheet metal, that is one thing I hate about buying a Stude. from an idiot or someone who had an idiot working on it.

              Been there, having to pound them out, or trash them.
              StudeRich
              Second Generation Stude Driver,
              Proud '54 Starliner Owner

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              • #8
                Originally posted by StudeRich View Post
                Anyone with two EYES can see that a Stude. V8 is WAY too heavy to be lifted by a piece of sheet metal, that is one thing I hate about buying a Stude. from an idiot or someone who had an idiot working on it.

                Been there, having to pound them out, or trash them.
                There always seem to be more idiots working on orphan cars than on common cars.
                RadioRoy, specializing in AM/FM conversions with auxiliary inputs for iPod/satellite/CD player. In the old car radio business since 1985.

                17A-S2 - 50 Commander convertible
                10G-C1 - 51 Champion starlight coupe
                10G-Q4 - 51 Champion business coupe
                4H-K5 - 53 Commander starliner hardtop
                5H-D5 - 54 Commander Conestoga wagon
                56B-D4 - 56 Commander station wagon
                60V-L6 - 60 Lark convertible

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                • #9
                  Here's a couple of NOS pans I had. And yes, I've already used both.





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                  • #10
                    The Large Drain Plugs were replaced with the smaller 9/16 Wrench Size Plugs in 1958.

                    The Larks and Lark Types have very little clearance between the Front of the Pan and the Steering Tie Rods, requiring the "Dent".

                    The C and K Models do not have that problem, but it is likely that they just made them all the same anyway.
                    StudeRich
                    Second Generation Stude Driver,
                    Proud '54 Starliner Owner

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                    • #11
                      Well, mine now has the shape it is supposed to have. I just can't figure out what to use as a dolly in the corners to get it nice and smooth. Need a round steel ball on a stick but I don't have anything like that and can't think of anything around the shop I could use. Any suggestions? The best I have come up with so far is taking the handle out of a big ball-peen hammer.
                      Wayne
                      "Trying to shed my CASO ways"

                      sigpic

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                      • #12
                        That would work. How about a LARGE ball bearing, a pool table ball, a bearing race, a rounded hammer handle.

                        Maybe see what Harbor Freight has for body tools?
                        Dis-Use on a Car is Worse Than Mis-Use...
                        1959 Studebaker Lark VIII 2DHTP

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Note there is another V-8 pan with a longer sump. I know it was used in the early C/K models.
                          "All attempts to 'rise above the issue' are simply an excuse to avoid it profitably." --Dick Gregory

                          Brad Johnson, SDC since 1975, ASC since 1990
                          Pine Grove Mills, Pa.
                          sigpic'33 Rockne 10, '51 Commander Starlight, '53 Commander Starlight "Désirée"

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                          • #14
                            Originally posted by karterfred88 View Post
                            Yep probably did, mine looks like it was stepped on by an elephant. It usually get squashed trying to install engine mounts as finding a suitable point to lift the engine from underneath doesn't exist.
                            I just did that Monday, replaced engine mounts. It was no sweat. A 2x4 on the pan mounting flange to clear the bottom of the pan with the jack under it. I did one side then the other. Easy peasy. Making a "U" shape from 2x4's would make it even easier, you could do both sides at the same time.
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