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  • rkapteyn
    replied
    The small tube that you discovered going to nowhere on the intake below the carburetor is a drain tube with a check valve on the end.
    Most Commander six engines had these , to drain gas after it was flooded. Good source for vacuum leaks!
    There is a steel ball in the check valve that opens the valve by gravity and sucks closed as soon as vacuum is created in the manifold.
    Get your original fuel pump repaired with modern neoprene parts and get your wipers back.
    Robert Kapteyn
    Last edited by rkapteyn; 09-01-2016, 09:57 AM.

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  • jclary
    replied
    Originally posted by wolfie View Post
    Since the OP said he had vaccuum wipers I had assumed it was dual action. Steve
    I think you were safe in making that assumption Steve. Especially, since you have owned one of these trucks with the larger engines, and probably a similar dual action fuel pump. It has been years since I have had a vehicle with that type of pump, and none were Studebakers.

    As to how the O/P's truck was running, if his fuel pump was failing, I have seen and experienced that before. In the initial stage of a diaphragm failing, it is possible for a pin hole to be small enough for the pump to operate (although sub-parr) under certain circumstances. I have witnessed this with fuel pumps and vacuum advance mechanisms too.

    Also, I am curious, (since it has been so long since examining one of these dual purpose pumps), about the relationship between the two separate vacuum chambers and diaphragms. For example, if the subject vehicle, remains using the electric pump for his main fuel pump...can the mechanical pump be rebuilt and used solely as a vacuum source for the windshield wipers? Will it, in anyway, be detrimental to operate the fuel chamber "dry?"
    For the "life" of the pump, the only benefit to pumping fuel through the fuel chamber, might be a "cooling" effect. As far as I know, the way the oil flow is routed in these engines, the mechanical mechanisms are lubricated/flooded by oil is it flows back over the timing gears, fuel pump cam, and actuator arm.

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  • tim333
    replied
    All these suggestions for electric fuel pumps is ridiculous. Just find the problem and fix it, the car was designed for a regular pump. I've driven antique cars for 40+ years without electric fuel pumps. It's the lazy way out to change, jmho.

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  • wolfie
    replied
    Originally posted by jclary View Post
    I just finished a quick scan of all the posts on this thread. Nowhere, unless I missed it, did the original poster mention if this fuel pump is a single or double acting fuel pump. If double acting...the portion that operates as a vacuum pump to operate the windshield wipers has failed. When operating properly, those vacuum pumps operate the wipers more reliably than manifold vacuum. However, if you have a failed vacuum pump, you can install a tube and connect your vacuum wiper motor to the intake vacuum port.
    Since the OP said he had vaccuum wipers I had assumed it was dual action. Steve

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  • jclary
    replied
    I just finished a quick scan of all the posts on this thread. Nowhere, unless I missed it, did the original poster mention if this fuel pump is a single or double acting fuel pump. If double acting...the portion that operates as a vacuum pump to operate the windshield wipers has failed. When operating properly, those vacuum pumps operate the wipers more reliably than manifold vacuum. However, if you have a failed vacuum pump, you can install a tube and connect your vacuum wiper motor to the intake vacuum port.

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  • wolfie
    replied
    Originally posted by DaveB View Post
    I believe the stalling issue is solved. After trying a number of suggestions, I broke down and installed an electric fuel pump. The truck has been running like a champ and even starts easier. One issue is now that I have disconnected the mechanical pump I have no vaccum wipers. Any auggestions besides going to an electric conversion?
    Rebuild your original pump and use an electric that will allow the fuel to flow through when it is not needed. You should have the vaccuum needed and should only need the electric for the hot start (might not even need it then). Steve

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  • jackb
    replied
    I never drive my 53' in the rain...no wipers....Rain-X ?

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  • DaveB
    replied
    I believe the stalling issue is solved. After trying a number of suggestions, I broke down and installed an electric fuel pump. The truck has been running like a champ and even starts easier. One issue is now that I have disconnected the mechanical pump I have no vaccum wipers. Any auggestions besides going to an electric conversion?

    Leave a comment:


  • RadioRoy
    replied
    B-12 Chemtool is a carburetor cleaner in a spray can. Get it at FLAPS ( friendly local auto parts store). You can use WD-40, but B-12 will show a vacuum leak more readily (or find a smaller leak) than WD-40. Spray it around the manifold gasket and the base of the carb. If the idle speed changes, there is a leak.
    Last edited by RadioRoy; 06-23-2016, 01:01 PM.

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  • TWChamp
    replied
    A lot of your symptoms are the same as what my Model A has when I use the 10% ethanol crap gas. After I started using the good gas only the Model A works fine. I don't know if you can buy the good gas in Michigan, but if you can I'd sure give it a try.

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  • DaveB
    replied
    Everyone, thanks for some good suggestions.
    jackb , the temp gage works and runs at 170 even when we had a 90 degree day when I had the issue.
    StudeRich/TWChampI installed an inline filter when I purchased the truck(primarily to protect the rebuilt carb. I also had the fuel tank sand blasted and coated). The filter was dirty. Unfortunately I am using the crap gas. The carb and tank should be ethanol resistant. I don't think the fuel pump is causing the problem as when it runs, it runs well.
    karterfred88- you might be on to something with the vaccum leaks. I have retorqued the manifolds. It's difficult to get the middle two nuts behind the carb. Any suggestions? I also tightened all the vaccum lines. I still don't know what the line is for coming from the vent tube. Any idaes? I noticed the old gasket was metalic but the new one is the standard high temp material. I'm tempted to double the gasket. Something else I noticed when I bolted up the exhaust, it was hitting the engine causing an exhaust leak. I'm concerned the manifolds aren't sealing properly. I've considered putting on the original intake. I dropped the exhaust tonight and am trying to adjust the exhaust eliminating it leaning against the engine.
    RadioRoy- I am not familar with Chemtool. I see several types. Which one are you suggesting and where do you buy it?
    Mrs K Corbin- The heat riser is operational.
    altair- It doesn't stumble until I am headed down the road, so can't prime it. The line is tight.
    64V-K7- I haven't heard about the propane. I'll have to try it.

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  • Mrs K Corbin
    replied
    agree with TWChamp, also since you replaced the manifold, have the checked the spring on the side of the exhaust manifold that controls the butterfly there and does the butterfly (I forgot what it's called) work ok?

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  • TWChamp
    replied
    Are you using the 10% crap gas? I use only the good gas without ethanol, but 2 years ago I drove my 1950 Champion to Michigan and got stuck with the crap gas when I couldn't find any of the good gas. It destroyed my fuel pump, so I had to install an electric rotary pump to get home. I was still having some starting problems like you describe, and I found the intake to the fuel line in the tank was blocked by the tank liner someone put into the tank 22 years ago. I finished stripping the liner out of the tank a couple weeks ago, and have put a couple hundred miles on the car since then. So far it's been starting much better, even after the short stops at the store.

    You might want to tee in a vacuum gauge at the fuel pump intake, just to see if there is blockage. Also check the fuel pump for pressure and flow out.

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  • altair
    replied
    When the engine starts to stumble squirt some fuel down the carb to confirm it is a fuel problem. Additionally confirm the fuel line is tight with no pin holes.

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  • 64V-K7
    replied
    Originally posted by RadioRoy View Post
    Check for vacuum leaks by spraying ........
    ....

    If you use Propane from a hand held bottle ( without lighting it) and the Propane finds a vacuum leak, it will be drawn into the intake. When it gets to the cylinders, it will increase the RPM significantly and immediately. You can tell where the vacuum leak is right then, whether hoses or gaskets.......

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