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  • #16
    I just finished a quick scan of all the posts on this thread. Nowhere, unless I missed it, did the original poster mention if this fuel pump is a single or double acting fuel pump. If double acting...the portion that operates as a vacuum pump to operate the windshield wipers has failed. When operating properly, those vacuum pumps operate the wipers more reliably than manifold vacuum. However, if you have a failed vacuum pump, you can install a tube and connect your vacuum wiper motor to the intake vacuum port.
    John Clary
    Greer, SC

    SDC member since 1975

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    • #17
      Originally posted by jclary View Post
      I just finished a quick scan of all the posts on this thread. Nowhere, unless I missed it, did the original poster mention if this fuel pump is a single or double acting fuel pump. If double acting...the portion that operates as a vacuum pump to operate the windshield wipers has failed. When operating properly, those vacuum pumps operate the wipers more reliably than manifold vacuum. However, if you have a failed vacuum pump, you can install a tube and connect your vacuum wiper motor to the intake vacuum port.
      Since the OP said he had vaccuum wipers I had assumed it was dual action. Steve
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      • #18
        All these suggestions for electric fuel pumps is ridiculous. Just find the problem and fix it, the car was designed for a regular pump. I've driven antique cars for 40+ years without electric fuel pumps. It's the lazy way out to change, jmho.

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        • #19
          Originally posted by wolfie View Post
          Since the OP said he had vaccuum wipers I had assumed it was dual action. Steve
          I think you were safe in making that assumption Steve. Especially, since you have owned one of these trucks with the larger engines, and probably a similar dual action fuel pump. It has been years since I have had a vehicle with that type of pump, and none were Studebakers.

          As to how the O/P's truck was running, if his fuel pump was failing, I have seen and experienced that before. In the initial stage of a diaphragm failing, it is possible for a pin hole to be small enough for the pump to operate (although sub-parr) under certain circumstances. I have witnessed this with fuel pumps and vacuum advance mechanisms too.

          Also, I am curious, (since it has been so long since examining one of these dual purpose pumps), about the relationship between the two separate vacuum chambers and diaphragms. For example, if the subject vehicle, remains using the electric pump for his main fuel pump...can the mechanical pump be rebuilt and used solely as a vacuum source for the windshield wipers? Will it, in anyway, be detrimental to operate the fuel chamber "dry?"
          For the "life" of the pump, the only benefit to pumping fuel through the fuel chamber, might be a "cooling" effect. As far as I know, the way the oil flow is routed in these engines, the mechanical mechanisms are lubricated/flooded by oil is it flows back over the timing gears, fuel pump cam, and actuator arm.
          John Clary
          Greer, SC

          SDC member since 1975

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          • #20
            The small tube that you discovered going to nowhere on the intake below the carburetor is a drain tube with a check valve on the end.
            Most Commander six engines had these , to drain gas after it was flooded. Good source for vacuum leaks!
            There is a steel ball in the check valve that opens the valve by gravity and sucks closed as soon as vacuum is created in the manifold.
            Get your original fuel pump repaired with modern neoprene parts and get your wipers back.
            Robert Kapteyn
            Last edited by rkapteyn; 09-01-2016, 09:57 AM.

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