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  • #16
    Originally posted by greyben View Post
    To free up a carb float valve that is stuck open cross wire two plugs and run the car. The resulting backfires will free up the float. Probably harmless for the most part, but I never found it very effective.
    That's funny; I have a 70 Chevelle Conv. that I've owned 28 years; as a sign of just how much things have changed I had a carb float that stuck, I banged it with a small hammer by the chamber and all was well. About a week later while waiting in the car for my wife i pulled out the owners manual and read the troubleshooting section.

    It said, "when the carburator overfloods take a suitable wrench and rap the fluid chamber" it had a little arrow that pointed to where to hit it. Unlike Today's 1 1/2 thick manual that says nothing except "be-careful". It didn't say call your lawyer to sue GM or rush to the dealer. Amazing how times change.

    Murray
    Life isn't about how to survive the storm, but how to dance in the rain !

    http://sites.google.com/site/intrigu...tivehistories/

    (/url) https://goo.gl/photos/ABBDQLgZk9DyJGgr5

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    • #17
      jclary opined, "I've heard other suggestions from “old mechanics,” that I have not tried. Such as, pouring black pepper into a radiator to stop a leak."

      Believe me, this works though it is certainly not a permanent repair but will get you home in most cases..

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      • #18
        Bit confused on what you're saying......
        However one of my Studebakers had bonded shoes that failed. I replaced them with Riveted after that. No problems.

        BTW it appears that modern brake pads are bonded from the factory.

        Originally posted by 63t-cab View Post
        Assuming You have some thing to Drive besides a Studebaker ? is it Disc brake on all 4 corners, or bonded rear Shoes ? - and would be risky no matter what make Vehicle.

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        • #19
          Originally posted by GrumpyOne View Post
          jclary opined, "I've heard other suggestions from “old mechanics,” that I have not tried. Such as, pouring black pepper into a radiator to stop a leak."

          Believe me, this works though it is certainly not a permanent repair but will get you home in most cases..
          Just to prove this particular temporary fix has some validity...some of the retail stop leak additives have an odor of pepper. The theory is that the small particles flow to the leaking area, swell while absorbing the liquid, and jam the hole. Just think, if foundry core sand had the same effect, no Studebaker would ever leak.

          Probably, all "leak stopping," additives, should be considered a "temporary" remedy.
          John Clary
          Greer, SC

          SDC member since 1975

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          • #20
            I, also, have used the pepper remedy and it worked every time.
            1957 Studebaker Champion 2 door. Staten Island, New York.

            "Education is not the learning of facts, but the training of the mind to think." -Albert Einstein

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