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  • paint questions

    I wasn't quite sure if paint questions should go here or if it was technical enough for the Technical forum, but what the hell.

    My '53 Starliner has the original Coral-Red-with-Monterey-Beige-top paint underneath cheesy bluish paint which is so thin in spots the original is showing through a little. Unlike many people (to judge by restored examples) I'm not all that wild about the original scheme, but it's not awful, and original paint is original paint. In your experience, can later paint be scraped or buffed off, especially if it wasn't all that well applied to begin with?

    The other paint question I have is about the trunk lifting bar, which of course reads STUDEBAKER in raised lettering in a recessed area. I've had it rechromed, but they didn't do the black paint on the recessed area or the white paint on the letters. Anyone have any recommendations for technique or type of paint for me to do this?

    Many thanks!

  • #2
    For painting on chrome I use a fine sand paper & make sure it does its job, if it falls of later you just do it over again, it's a light job anyway.
    For the blue paint: take some rough sponge & try where it doesn't show.
    sigpic

    Josephine
    -55
    Champion V8
    4d sedan

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    • #3
      When I paint the recessed areas on chrome I just clean it well and paint with a thinned enamel model paint. The paint will run down into the letters and mine has lasted well. If you get any on the raised surface just carefully wipe it with a soft cloth stretched over your finger tip.
      sigpic

      "In the heart of Arkansas."
      Searcy, Arkansas
      1952 Commander 2 door. Really fine 259.
      1952 2R pickup

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      • #4
        I spray a little bit of etch primer, a very light coat, then using automotive single stage paint with hardener, dab it in the recess. let it dry, and as 52-fan stated, wipe it with a lacquer thinner rag over the chrome. The thinner will not harm the chrome. Just a damp rag will do it.

        Jim
        "We can't all be Heroes, Some us just need to stand on the curb and clap as they go by" Will Rogers

        We will provide the curb for you to stand on and clap!


        Indy Honor Flight www.IndyHonorFlight.org

        As of Veterans Day 2017, IHF has flown 2,450 WWII, Korean, and Vietnam Veterans to Washington DC at NO charge! to see
        their Memorials!

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        • #5
          Originally posted by Noxnabaker View Post
          For painting on chrome I use a fine sand paper & make sure it does its job, if it falls of later you just do it over again, it's a light job anyway.
          For the blue paint: take some rough sponge & try where it doesn't show.
          What kind of rough sponge? I think some have grit embedded.

          By the way, thanks for the answers, everyone!

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          • #6
            Not sure about "washing the paint off" idea. I'm sure there will be areas of repair and primer uncovered as you go through the "cheesy blue" paint. Depending on how much effort you want to put into it, best case scenario is it will be mostly original color with blue lines at all the joints where panels are bolted together. If you feel you must, first try some lacquer thinner on a not easily seen part. If the original enamel paint on the car underneath is all still there, it won't be hurt by it and maybe you can just remove the "paint job" that way, but be prepared to be disappointed.

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            • #7
              Purchasing an "ink eraser" (or "ball point pen eraser") at the dollar store was my answer to roughing up chrome just enough to let the paint adhere in the chrome. One can get into the corners without roughing up the surrounding area. Model car paint has always worked when I didn't have any lettering enamel around.

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              • #8
                No one else has tackled it yet, so I'll give it a go.

                Removing the cheesy blue paint will be a hit and miss attempt. A lot depends on the surface preparation before the blue was applied. With luck, it was poor. And why why was it repainted? was there any damage? are there places where the old paint has failed, or was it just time for a change?

                One thing to try is to put the stickiest duct tape on the blue paint, press it in firmly and rip off the band aid (if you will). Poor prep will lift it off like magic, though it would take quite a few rolls to strip the car. The next tedious method would be a careful wet sand to remove the paint and see what condition the original paint is. It would be easy to ruin even good original paint, so it must be a fine grit ( start at no less that 300) and do it by hand. And the chances of having usable paint after this is small, but what a great thing it would be.
                Ron Dame
                '63 Champ

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by Ron Dame View Post
                  And why why was it repainted? was there any damage? are there places where the old paint has failed, or was it just time for a change?
                  No knowing, unfortunately. It came from an estate out in California. (The first one in this thread: http://forum.studebakerdriversclub.c...rs-53-hardtops)

                  Originally posted by Ron Dame View Post
                  One thing to try is to put the stickiest duct tape on the blue paint, press it in firmly and rip off the band aid (if you will). Poor prep will lift it off like magic, though it would take quite a few rolls to strip the car.
                  Do you have any recommendation for stickiest duct tape?

                  Many thanks for all your advice, by the way!

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                  • #10
                    The way I see it, you are going to be repainting the car so sand it and get it as ready as you can. The original paint must have had problems and you are just going to rediscover them and probably make some new ones with any attempt to save the original paint.
                    I have often sanded on cars that had some good paint under a coat or two of newer paint, but never all good that could be saved.
                    This was my business for many years, so I speak from much experience.
                    You will be money and time ahead to get, even a cheap paint job from one of the discount paint shops, then to toss time and money away and then end up painting the car anyway.
                    Your time and money. Just have never seen it work out to an advantage. I would spend the time removing trim and save money that way.
                    sigpic1966 Daytona (The First One)
                    1950 Champion Convertible
                    1950 Champion 4Dr
                    1955 President 2 Dr Hardtop
                    1957 Thunderbird

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                    • #11
                      I have a 38 State Commander and have just discovered gasoline will take the paint right off down to bare metal. I was working under the car so put the front end up on jack stands in the garage. The back end was in the sun and I had recently filled the gas tank. The heat of the sun must have expanded the gas and it was dripping out of the gas cap. When I started smelling gas I thought I must have hit a junction in the gas line. Checked the line and no problem, I got out from under the car and saw a small puddle. I went to clean it up and noticed the paint bubbling below the filler where the gas ran down. So you may be able to remove the paint very easily if you decide to go all the way. I now have to repaint that rear fender which is a shame as it is suppose to be a survivor with original paint. I am beginning to question that fact.Click image for larger version

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