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Absolutely fantastic Studebaker day!

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  • Absolutely fantastic Studebaker day!

    Today, was a day of sunshine after two days of rain. It was also a day when I didn't have to take someone to a doctor visit, or have an appointment myself. After doing my usual chores of feeding and watering my animals, I was free to do my own thing. Finally, after spending countless hours of "thinking about it," gathering materials, mentally engineering, re-engineering, I was free to begin cutting angle iron, drilling holes, welding, and fabricating on my V8 engine test stand.

    I would post pics, but I have this new iPhone, and am still learning how to use it. Today, I let the battery run down, and it wouldn't let me take a pic. Once I take a picture, then, I'll have to learn how to download and save it to some file I can use to post it on the forum. Stand by for that.

    As for this fabrication project...I love it. I'd choose this kind of activity over a free month at Disney or an all expense paid ocean cruise or Las Vegas vacation. Today, I got the motor mount legs fabricated and attached them to the engine. Then, I cut two angle iron base runners, which the legs will rest on. Those runners will sit in two pieces of channel iron bolted front to back on the small trailer which serves as a foundation for the mobile engine test stand. Right now, the runners are temporarily attached to the motor mount legs by four vice grips. Tomorrow, I plan to weld the two front legs to the runners. The rear mount legs will not be welded. They will have to be bolted, because they will need to be relocated when attaching a bell housing, and transmission.

    I don't know how much I'll be able to get done tomorrow. I have to go to the nursing home, and accompany my Mother to an appointment to check her pacemaker. Anything I can do for her, always comes first. But for today, it was a ton of fun. I was exhausted by late afternoon. It took me about an hour to gather my scattered tools, materials, and place them where I can locate them when life lets me return to the project.

    Like the sweet cherry on top of an ice-cream-sunday...today's walk to the mailbox yielded my order of Studebaker print fabric from Duane Miller (Deaf Mute on the forum) and the Hemmings discount coupon from Bob Palma. Hey Bob...the Elvis stamp was a very cool touch.

    I am completely worn out from all the exercise, walking from barn, to shop, to the man cave. Scrounging through various piles of materials (scrap/junk). Even with all the "thinking it through"...the plans changed as I fabricated. Always finding something that would "work better." I was so busy, I forgot lunch until late. Not a good thing for a diabetic. When I finally staggered into the house for a bite to eat, I was feeling weak. I checked my blood sugar, and it was down to 87. That's quite low for me. However, a bowl of my wife's soup, and a little fresh homemade fruit salad and I was good to go.

    The plan now is to return to the project in the morning. Of course, "in the morning," ..."plans" may change, and the comfort of my couch, might dictate otherwise. But for today...an absolutely fantastic Studebaker day!
    John Clary
    Greer, SC

    SDC member since 1975

  • #2
    Ain't it GREAT?!...

    Comment


    • #3
      While your on the couch you can get that phone figured out, ha!
      With that phone you'll find that you can post a picture straight from the phone no need to save it somewhere else.

      You can even Google it on your computer and find a tutorial to walk you through it.

      When I have a hard time with crap like that I usually find that I'm over thinking it and complicating things.

      Dean.

      Comment


      • #4
        'Sounds like a happy day, John. BP
        We've got to quit saying, "How stupid can you be?" Too many people are taking it as a challenge.

        Ayn Rand:
        "You can avoid reality, but you cannot avoid the consequences of avoiding reality."

        G. K. Chesterton: This triangle of truisms, of father, mother, and child, cannot be destroyed; it can only destroy those civilizations which disregard it.

        Comment


        • #5
          I love your idea John. I happen to have an old Murray trailer (used to be a Murder-sickle trailer) in Fawn Lodge that would be perfect for this. Problem is, I don't weld. Gosh, if I took a class at the college, that would be a great project! Do post pics! I for one would love to see it! How very much easier it would be to move a motor around with one of those. In fact, the trailer currently has a Dodge 440 -w- tranny sitting on it. Will have to find a new home for that...
          Home of the famous Mr. Ed!
          K.I.S.S. Keep It Simple Studebaker!
          Ron Smith
          Where the heck is Fawn Lodge, CA?

          Comment


          • #6
            Originally posted by jclary View Post
            today, was a day of sunshine after two days of rain. It was also a day when i didn't have to take someone to a doctor visit, or have an appointment myself. After doing my usual chores of feeding and watering my animals, i was free to do my own thing. Finally, after spending countless hours of "thinking about it," gathering materials, mentally engineering, re-engineering, i was free to begin cutting angle iron, drilling holes, welding, and fabricating on my v8 engine test stand.

            I would post pics, but i have this new iphone, and am still learning how to use it. Today, i let the battery run down, and it wouldn't let me take a pic. Once i take a picture, then, i'll have to learn how to download and save it to some file i can use to post it on the forum. Stand by for that.

            As for this fabrication project...i love it. I'd choose this kind of activity over a free month at disney or an all expense paid ocean cruise or las vegas vacation. Today, i got the motor mount legs fabricated and attached them to the engine. Then, i cut two angle iron base runners, which the legs will rest on. Those runners will sit in two pieces of channel iron bolted front to back on the small trailer which serves as a foundation for the mobile engine test stand. Right now, the runners are temporarily attached to the motor mount legs by four vice grips. Tomorrow, i plan to weld the two front legs to the runners. The rear mount legs will not be welded. They will have to be bolted, because they will need to be relocated when attaching a bell housing, and transmission.

            I don't know how much i'll be able to get done tomorrow. I have to go to the nursing home, and accompany my mother to an appointment to check her pacemaker. Anything i can do for her, always comes first. But for today, it was a ton of fun. I was exhausted by late afternoon. It took me about an hour to gather my scattered tools, materials, and place them where i can locate them when life lets me return to the project.

            Like the sweet cherry on top of an ice-cream-sunday...today's walk to the mailbox yielded my order of studebaker print fabric from duane miller (deaf mute on the forum) and the hemmings discount coupon from bob palma. Hey bob...the elvis stamp was a very cool touch.

            I am completely worn out from all the exercise, walking from barn, to shop, to the man cave. Scrounging through various piles of materials (scrap/junk). Even with all the "thinking it through"...the plans changed as i fabricated. Always finding something that would "work better." i was so busy, i forgot lunch until late. Not a good thing for a diabetic. When i finally staggered into the house for a bite to eat, i was feeling weak. I checked my blood sugar, and it was down to 87. That's quite low for me. However, a bowl of my wife's soup, and a little fresh homemade fruit salad and i was good to go.

            The plan now is to return to the project in the morning. Of course, "in the morning," ..."plans" may change, and the comfort of my couch, might dictate otherwise. but for today...an absolutely fantastic studebaker day!
            oh man !! Ain't it nice.. Being retired !!

            Comment


            • #7
              Made some progress since last posting. Here's some pics.
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              Notice my Miller welder listing to one side. Yesterday, in the cold, one of the very old re-purposed plastic lawnmower wheels finally cracked off when I was moving the welder into position. I was having to use the my generator to tack weld some of the angle iron in place. Reason for the generator power was because the trailer was not close enough to the 240V outlet, and until I built enough strength into the structure...I couldn't move the trailer. Apparently, my generator power is barely marginal for welding in cold weather. I had difficulty getting good weld penetration. Therefore, my tack welds are very "tacky."

              This is a light duty trailer. Using one of those trailer tongue jacks, revealed that, due to the "off-set" of the jack, the weight of the engine would cause the trailer tongue to distort, and even flex the entire frame. To give it balance, I made a mad dash to Northern Tool and bought another one. I mounted it on the other side of the trailer tongue, and bolted the two jacks together. Sandwiching the tongue between them stabilized the rig and made it much more secure. I was even able to use a trailer dolly and pull it out into the yard. Next time I work on it, I plan to move it to where I can plug the welder into my regular power and clean up my "tacky" welds.

              I'm not sure if you can see it (due to the quality of the photos), but there is a small 1/4 ton chain hoist connected to the engine mount runners, to the tongue jack clamp. Once I was able to release the engine form the engine lift, the engine was sitting too far back on the trailer frame. I used that hoist to winch the engine forward for weight distribution. I plan to develop a clamping method that will allow me to adjust the engine position as I add or remove components. Once I complete this phase of the construction, I'll install a radiator, gauges, small fuel tank, battery box (with battery hold down) and an ignition switch.
              John Clary
              Greer, SC

              SDC member since 1975

              Comment


              • #8


                Once the staff came to take her to lunch, I gathered the clothes from her hamper and headed home. After lunch, I went out to the man cave to survey what tinkering I could do while waiting for the super bowl. With my engine completely released from the hoist, its entire weight resting on the test stand trailer, and secure enough to be towed, I used my tow dolly to pull it out in the yard and around the building where I could complete welding the tall motor-mount supports. In my previous post, I mentioned that I had only tack welded them using generator power. To finish the job, I added a couple of steel gussets for strength.

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                While pulling the rig back across the lawn, I thought about two spare larger diameter trailer tires I have that would give the trailer enough ground clearance to make sliding the engine hoist under it easier. Also, those tires should provide less rolling resistance over the ground. Another thing I noticed was the original bolts that came with the first trailer tongue jack, were about a half inch too long to allow the jack I had attached on the opposite side to swivel up and out of the way when not needed to support the trailer. So, taking care of that small problem was where the setbacks began. The fenders on the trailer would have to go. While removing the first fender, I was startled by a loud bang. (Not good for us veterans) That was when I noticed that one of the old weathered tires on my trailer tow dolly had gone flat. I quickly washed my greasy hands, grabbed the keys to my wife's car, and headed to Harbor Freight. I was going to buy a new dolly wheel. They had a ton of wheels, right size every thing, 'cept for the axle hole size. Instead, my only option was to buy a new three dollar tube. Back home, I took off the wheel, unbolted the two halves, installed the tube, put the wheel back together, aired it up, and put it back on the trailer dolly. With that done, I put the dolly back on the trailer, and finished installing the bigger trailer wheels.
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                Once that task was completed, I went to work swapping the trailer jack bolts for some that wouldn't interfere with the swivel mechanism.


                That's when I noticed it. The dolly tire I had just put the new tube in. My brand new tube was bulging right through the tire tread.

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                I had thought that the bang I had heard before was just a tube blowing out. Apparently, the whole tire had blown out. Of course, once it went flat, the deflated weather cracked tire just looked old. Once again, I had to stop what I was doing, to fix that problem. Luckily, I had another wheel with the same size tire, (but not a one inch axle hole), so I had to dismantle two wheels. I had to remove the blown tire, put the new tube in the good (but old) tire, and remount it on the dolly wheel. Once I got all that done, I had used up all today's light. I managed to gather up my tools, get everything closed up, and stumble into the house in time for Super Bowl kickoff. I think I'll sleep good tonight.
                Attached Files
                John Clary
                Greer, SC

                SDC member since 1975

                Comment


                • #9
                  Stick welding all that stuff,..
                  You're a manly man! I like it!

                  Dean.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Blustery day today. When I completed my usual chores, I got back to tinkering with the engine stand. Opening the doors revealed that one of my tires had leaked down overnight. I got the idea to shoot in some of that green Slime Tire Sealant. The blasted stuff worked so well that it stopped up the hole in the stem. Really...I removed the valve core to allow the sealant to flow into the tire. After I figured I had let enough flow in, I cleaned up the stem, reinstalled the valve core, and attempted to air up the tire. But, no air flowed in. I couldn't believe it. I ended up having to remove the valve core again and ream the hole with a small drill bit. Again, reinstalled the valve core and this time it took air. I only hope the stuff does as good a job on the slow leak as it did the valve stem hole.

                    Next, I remembered where I had left the bell housing that was attached to another spare truck engine given to me years ago. Dragging it into daylight, for the first time in years, revealed that it had been overtaken by a squatter. A big black widow spider, and potentially thousands of her offspring in the form of three egg pods. Once I had evicted the squatters, I mated the bell housing to the back of the engine with four finger tight bolts. It fits, but I think it is actually a car bell housing. It has a motor mount on the bottom, and my C-Cab parts truck has four mounts. Two up front, and two on the back. I'll post pics for comparison. The engine on the stand is a 1959 Truck 289. The one in the parts truck is a (224) 1955. It has a basic three speed transmission with no overdrive. Notice the difference in the two bell housings.

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                    All these years of owning my six cylinder truck, talking trucks, and thinking I knew something about them...it is embarrassing how little I really know. Swapping the six for an eight is more than (only) the engine. It is more than just a V8 bell housing, V8 flywheel, clutch, pressure plate, transmission, etc. Comparing these two bell housings, for example. Both will bolt up to the engine, but, what about the clutch pedal shaft? Will it align? What about the size of the flywheel? The early truck (224) V8's, I've been told, are smaller than the later 259/289 engines. It is more complex than we often discuss in our casual conversations.

                    Next, I located two rusty old flywheels lying around. I have no clue as to which engines they fit. I took a couple of pics of both side by side, and with the gears together. While they are clearly different sizes...the gear pitch seems to be the same. Anyone want to speculate (from the pics) without measurements what you think they fit?

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                    Next, a quick survey of my low lying rusty "Toe Stumping" parts piles revealed at least six starters. Sadly, even if I knew what they fit when they were placed there (temporarily of course) too many years have gone by. I have no clue, in fact, I don't even know if they are six or twelve volt.

                    The deeper I get into this project...the more I realize how little I know. I'm just gonna keep plugging away and plodding along. Anyone see anything you can use, and have anything I can use...perhaps we can help each other out.
                    John Clary
                    Greer, SC

                    SDC member since 1975

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      The 12 volt starters are sometimes marked with a "12" as 12 volt was a new fangled thing at one time.
                      RadioRoy, specializing in AM/FM conversions with auxiliary inputs for iPod/satellite/CD player. In the old car radio business since 1985.

                      17A-S2 - 50 Commander convertible
                      10G-C1 - 51 Champion starlight coupe
                      10G-Q4 - 51 Champion business coupe
                      4H-K5 - 53 Commander starliner hardtop
                      5H-D5 - 54 Commander Conestoga wagon
                      56B-D4 - 56 Commander station wagon
                      60V-L6 - 60 Lark convertible

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Thanks Roy, I'll see if I can scrape off enough rust to reveal it. Will it be stamped into the casing, or a tag?
                        John Clary
                        Greer, SC

                        SDC member since 1975

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Thanks for posting all those photos John. Looks great!
                          Home of the famous Mr. Ed!
                          K.I.S.S. Keep It Simple Studebaker!
                          Ron Smith
                          Where the heck is Fawn Lodge, CA?

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Delco 6v starter labels are black. 12v labels are red. I can look up Delco numbers for you.
                            Skip Lackie

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Originally posted by Skip Lackie View Post
                              Delco 6v starter labels are black. 12v labels are red. I can look up Delco numbers for you.
                              Thanks for the offer Skip. You have already been a great help. Some of these items have been languishing in dark, low lying areas of the man cave for decades. All of them originally placed "temporarily"...but stayed there long enough to acquire "stalagmite" status in the man cave. I will try to gather them and attempt to find labels. While it is cold, I might stand a better chance of getting past the "guard spiders."
                              John Clary
                              Greer, SC

                              SDC member since 1975

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