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  • I'm looking to buy this Landcruiser

    Hey all. My name is Gabrielle, and I am looking at purchasing this 1950 Landcruiser. I am in the Navy and will be stationed close to the place it is for sale. My boyfriend lives very close to the town it is for sale in, also. We are not big on American made cars. We've been in the Volkswagen scene for many years. My first car was a 1973 VW bay window bus, back in 2010. I've owned everything from air cooled buses, bugs and squarebacks, to water cooled bugs and Jettas. I learned how o drive on a 1962 VW single cab. When I was 17, I rebuilt my first air cooled engine and did a motor swap in my 1987 Jetta. So I know what I'm doing.

    I currently am car-less and came across this Landcruiser and fell in love. I love the soft patina and the bullet nose. My boyfriend is not a fan, he feels like I'd be back stabbing our VW love. But, I've been wanting something different and I think this is it. It'd still be easy to work on, and it needs a bit of work (new seals, parts need greased up, interior could use an overhaul), which is great for me. I love doing stuff like that.

    According to the power it has all new brakes,. exhaust system. water pump and all hoses, cap rotor wires, spark plugs, battery, anti freeze, belt, fuel sending unit, and starter selenoid. It was a Colorado car, where it sat for 30 years. It wasn't running when he bought it, and obviously he's done work. How hard is it to find parts if something were to break? It's an automatic (which I'm used to manuals)...are there issues with autos? What should I look for, as in main issues? It's a pretty solid car from pictures. Any tips when it comes to looking it over is appreciated.

    Also, how hard is it to do a 12v conversion? Bags are important.

    Thanks,
    -Gabrielle






    Some of the cars I've owned:





    My boyfriends 1973 bagged squareback:

  • #2
    Gabrielle: I approve of everything I see in the photos. Be patient and you will be inundated with advice and ideas from your new friends on the SDC forum. Everything you need for safe dependable enjoyment of your Studebaker is available from many vendors specializing in parts, etc. This section and the Technical section can be of great assistance. Using the search function can put you on target.

    Your service and that of your boyfriend to our country is greatly appreciated.
    Last edited by Bob Bryant; 01-16-2016, 06:23 PM.
    "Growing old is mandatory, but growing up is optional." author unknown

    Comment


    • #3
      The 12 volt conversion thing is not too big a deal, it involves as you may know replacing the Defroster Motor, Heater Motor, Wiper Motor if Electric, Tail Light bulbs, Parking Light Bulbs, headlights, Instrument Light Bulbs with 12 Volt Units, also switching the Battery and Ignition Coil Cables/wires from Positive Ground to Negative Ground.

      The other option is to use a 6/12 Volt battery to tap off the 6 Volts for the Original Fuel & Temp Gauge, Radio, Clock, Fans or whatever you want to keep and power up with 6 Volts, while running the Ignition, Starter and charge System on 12 volts.

      Also a Volt-A-Drop Unit could be used to drop to 6 Volts for Temp. Gauge and Fuel Gauge, Radio etc. if converting all the rest to 12 Volts.

      You can buy a Commander 245 c.i.d. Big Six Starter for a '56 to 1960 Truck with the same Engine, to get a 12 volt one.

      If the Detroit Gear Studebaker 3 Band Automatic Trans. works good, service it and keep it.

      Otherwise networking with some of the other 10,000 Plus SDC Members will get you the Borg Warner T-86, 3 Speed Manual Overdrive Transmission changeover Parts you will need to build a much better driving Car.

      This was an original option when the Car was New and the Most common Trans. setup in 1950 Commanders, which by the way is what a "Land Cruiser" really is.

      It is the Long Wheelbase Luxury stretch version of the Commander 4 Door Sedan.

      Click image for larger version

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ID:	1703358 A Manual Trans. with O.D. Car.

      The Right Hand one of these 3 "T" handles under the Dash is the O.D. Handle to take it in or out of Overdrive, usually before driving.
      Last edited by StudeRich; 01-16-2016, 07:13 PM.
      StudeRich
      Second Generation Stude Driver,
      Proud '54 Starliner Owner

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      • #4
        Should make a nice ole heavy patina cruising machine . . .

        Comment


        • #5
          The '50 Land Cruiser is a unique model and considered maybe the most luxurious of all the post-war Studes. I envy you the build and driving it.

          jack vines
          PackardV8

          Comment


          • #6
            Gabrielle: Thank you for serving and protecting our country.

            As for getting into the Studebaker hobby, I can tell you that I find it to be the very best. Earlier I spent a decade or two restoring Model A fords and enjoyed it BUT I have found the folks that drive, restore, and love Studebakers offer much more in terms of support and willingness to share knowledge (esp. the Forum). I purchased my first Studebaker a short 6 years ago and have found it to be one of the best decisions I have ever made.

            As for parts, we have to have the best source of parts for 50+ year old cars with a major supplier like Studebaker International, and many, many, many great individual vendors that will not only sell you parts but take the time to make sure you are getting the part you really need and to give you guidance on the proper way to install it.

            Buy your Studebaker, join the Studebaker Drivers Club, join the local chapter of the Studebaker Drivers Club, make the meetings when you are available and get ready for a great experience!
            Nick

            Comment


            • #7
              Originally posted by StudeRich View Post
              The 12 volt conversion thing is not too big a deal, it involves as you may know replacing the Defroster Motor, Heater Motor, Wiper Motor if Electric, Tail Light bulbs, Parking Light Bulbs, headlights, Instrument Light Bulbs with 12 Volt Units, also switching the Battery and Ignition Coil Cables/wires from Positive Ground to Negative Ground.

              The other option is to use a 6/12 Volt battery to tap off the 6 Volts for the Original Fuel & Temp Gauge, Radio, Clock, Fans or whatever you want to keep and power up with 6 Volts, while running the Ignition, Starter and charge System on 12 volts.

              Also a Volt-A-Drop Unit could be used to drop to 6 Volts for Temp. Gauge and Fuel Gauge, Radio etc. if converting all the rest to 12 Volts.

              You can buy a Commander 245 c.i.d. Big Six Starter for a '56 to 1960 Truck with the same Engine, to get a 12 volt one.

              If the Detroit Gear Studebaker 3 Band Automatic Trans. works good, service it and keep it.

              Otherwise networking with some of the other 10,000 Plus SDC Members will get you the Borg Warner T-86, 3 Speed Manual Overdrive Transmission changeover Parts you will need to build a much better driving Car.

              This was an original option when the Car was New and the Most common Trans. setup in 1950 Commanders, which by the way is what a "Land Cruiser" really is.

              It is the Long Wheelbase Luxury stretch version of the Commander 4 Door Sedan.

              [ATTACH=CONFIG]50716[/ATTACH] [ATTACH=CONFIG]50717[/ATTACH] A Manual Trans. with O.D. Car.

              The Right Hand one of these 3 "T" handles under the Dash is the O.D. Handle to take it in or out of Overdrive, usually before driving.
              Good info. Are the automatics known to fail? You said with the O.D. tranny it'd be a much better running car? VW automatic trannys are known to fail too...they still can't get it right in 2016 ha. I'm told it shifts smooth and everything works great, but of course won't know until I actually drive it.

              Comment


              • #8
                Originally posted by ndynis View Post
                Gabrielle: Thank you for serving and protecting our country.

                As for getting into the Studebaker hobby, I can tell you that I find it to be the very best. Earlier I spent a decade or two restoring Model A fords and enjoyed it BUT I have found the folks that drive, restore, and love Studebakers offer much more in terms of support and willingness to share knowledge (esp. the Forum). I purchased my first Studebaker a short 6 years ago and have found it to be one of the best decisions I have ever made.

                As for parts, we have to have the best source of parts for 50+ year old cars with a major supplier like Studebaker International, and many, many, many great individual vendors that will not only sell you parts but take the time to make sure you are getting the part you really need and to give you guidance on the proper way to install it.

                Buy your Studebaker, join the Studebaker Drivers Club, join the local chapter of the Studebaker Drivers Club, make the meetings when you are available and get ready for a great experience!
                Nick
                Thank you! I'm glad parts aren't super hard to come by. It's also reassuring to know there are lots of resources out there!

                Comment


                • #9
                  Randy Rundle is a friend to Studebakers and prints the most comprehensive guide to 6-12 volt conversion. http://www.fifthaveinternetgarage.com/

                  The '50 Land Cruiser is the longest tail to nose Studebaker production car to exit the post war assembly line, and a joy for highway cruising. It's also the last year the 245 cid Commander Six was offered in automobiles (available in trucks through 1960), and the first year the Borg Warner DG200 automatic transmission was offered. Properly serviced, that trans is darned near bulletproof and can be pushed as hard as you want but, as Rich intimated, will not have the dexterity and efficiency of the T86 manual with overdrive.
                  This beast is like riding in your living room, and not particularly comfortable at speed in the chicane.
                  The engine production began in 1932 so, over a twenty-nine year span, it proved its worthiness.
                  "All attempts to 'rise above the issue' are simply an excuse to avoid it profitably." --Dick Gregory

                  Brad Johnson, SDC since 1975, ASC since 1990
                  Pine Grove Mills, Pa.
                  sigpic'33 Rockne 10, '51 Commander Starlight, '53 Commander Starlight "Désirée"

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Gabrielle, you asked if the Studebaker Automatic Drive was known for failures.
                    Actually as Brad said they are near bulletproof, even used in much later Jaguars.

                    But the problem is, when they go it's a big problem finding qualified Techs to properly rebuild it, not to mention the high cost of the Parts.

                    And of course an Overdrive in ANY Car trumps a straight one to one top gear, because of the reduced Fuel consumption, Oil usage, Engine Wear and sound level when cruising at 55-70.

                    All the Parts you will ever need are here: http://studebakervendors.com
                    Last edited by StudeRich; 01-16-2016, 11:52 PM.
                    StudeRich
                    Second Generation Stude Driver,
                    Proud '54 Starliner Owner

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Last year I had the opportunity to drive a restored one just like that about 30 miles on the southern California freeways and was quite comfortable at speed, although I left plenty of braking distance. It is a wonderful car that draws a lot of attention. They don't drive like a modern car but you have enough experience with older cars to understand that.
                      Rob

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Originally posted by mapman View Post
                        ... quite comfortable at speed, although I left plenty of braking distance.
                        There is that to consider. The brakes in the '50 Commanders were probably adequate for their time; but times have changed. Brake upgrades are available, and should be considered if you hope to do much traveling.
                        "All attempts to 'rise above the issue' are simply an excuse to avoid it profitably." --Dick Gregory

                        Brad Johnson, SDC since 1975, ASC since 1990
                        Pine Grove Mills, Pa.
                        sigpic'33 Rockne 10, '51 Commander Starlight, '53 Commander Starlight "Désirée"

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          [QUOTE=StudeRich;967649]

                          "The other option is to use a 6/12 Volt battery"

                          Or use 2[two] 6 volt batteries in series. This will give 12 volt and a tap point for 6 volt just as the specially modified 6/12 volt battery does.
                          The 6/12 volt battery is available from "antiquebattery.com". Could prove to be a pain in the butt should something should go wrong with it.
                          The 2 6 volt batteries are available at any good auto parts store. Readily available.
                          You will absolutely need to check ALL grounds. Replace any missing or corroded. Make clean and bright and tight connections.
                          Your dealing with 65 years of crud, rust, corrosion and general old age.

                          I had a 70 VW bus for far too many years.
                          The added maintenance needed for an old car is not much different than the constant tinkering required to keep that old bus on the road.
                          So in that respect you are prepared.
                          Last edited by 55 56 PREZ 4D; 01-17-2016, 01:58 AM.
                          South Lompoc Studebaker

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Gabrielle: My 1966 VW Squareback was blue. It had a sliding metal sunroof that leaked. It may be that someone had tried to pry it open. Your wheels would have looked good on it. It is hoped you got some of the info you requested. Any specific questions direct them to the forum.
                            "Growing old is mandatory, but growing up is optional." author unknown

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              If your boyfriend doesn't warm up to the Stude, in all honesty he may be somewhat dimwitted, and it may be time for a new man.
                              Meanwhile, have fun with this great car!
                              Dan

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