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Prewar Studebaker Prices nosediving!

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  • #16
    WOW, Craig; what a difference! BP
    We've got to quit saying, "How stupid can you be?" Too many people are taking it as a challenge.

    Ayn Rand:
    "You can avoid reality, but you cannot avoid the consequences of avoiding reality."

    G. K. Chesterton: This triangle of truisms, of father, mother, and child, cannot be destroyed; it can only destroy those civilizations which disregard it.

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    • #17
      Well...DANG!...How disappointing...too bad this thread was posted around Christmas...it would have been better on April 1st. How cruel to post such a "downer" at this time. Reminds me of my 15th Christmas, when I got my first ever "NEW" bicycle, and I was expecting to be taken to get my DRIVER'S LICENSE. (Back then, you could get your license at 14)

      I know you fortunate folks who own such cars don't want to see their values decline...but it seems that it will be the most likely way I'll ever manage the feat. Of course, if I would suck it up and liquidate some of my other assets, I could get it done. On the other hand, I've also heard that the ensuing divorce could get expensive and messy too!
      John Clary
      Greer, SC

      SDC member since 1975

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      • #18
        Originally posted by BobPalma View Post
        Craig; what a difference!
        It affected the real small independents even MORE as they didn't have any Canadian assembly plants where the required Canadian material & labor would have reduced the prices somewhat. Duty and taxes were horrendous on complete, imported cars at the time, plus shipping from U.S. factories.

        Craig

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        • #19
          Hi Bob

          How about a look at the Marmon pages, see what a Sixteen a few years old would cost .......better be setting down!

          Although the WWII scrap drives claimed countless magnificent cars and it was in service of a good cause, so many were lost well beforehand simply because they became so valueless as used cars when only a few years old. Subsequent owners had neither the resources or the inclination to maintain what were still costly cars to do so. Many large, seven passenger sedan were used in taxi/livery/bus operations or had their bodies modified into trucks for various purposes such as fire truck/crew wagons, even tow trucks.

          Even after WWII, postwar wrecking yards still had thousands of large, Classics turned in for scrap in the headlong rush to get new cars. Ironically, many that were in good condition had been put up in storage during the war awaiting the general availability of new tires and the end of gas rationing again. New and used car dealers had more than they could ever have saved, what a terrible loss that more weren't simply withheld from the market for another decade or two.

          Steve

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          • #20
            Originally posted by 56H-Y6 View Post
            Hi Bob

            How about a look at the Marmon pages, see what a Sixteen a few years old would cost .......better be setting down! Steve
            Steve, all the Marmons aren't on one page, or even on a spread of two pages. But all the Marmon 16s in this book can be seen on Pages 66 and 67:



            'Looks like the early 1936 retail price of a 3-year-old "16" coupe is about 20% of its original MSRP! Yikes! BP
            We've got to quit saying, "How stupid can you be?" Too many people are taking it as a challenge.

            Ayn Rand:
            "You can avoid reality, but you cannot avoid the consequences of avoiding reality."

            G. K. Chesterton: This triangle of truisms, of father, mother, and child, cannot be destroyed; it can only destroy those civilizations which disregard it.

            Comment


            • #21
              The above value of 1936 and prior cars implies that 1964 models would be worth only pennies. I will be glad to break open my piggy bank and use the pennies to buy your fleet of 1964 models.
              Milt

              1947 Champion (owned since 1967)
              1961 Hawk 4-speed
              1967 Avanti
              1961 Lark 2 door
              1988 Avanti Convertible

              Member of SDC since 1973

              Comment


              • #22
                Hi Bob

                Thanks for the look at Marmon, given that only 390 Marmon Sixteens were built, their low value by WWII and their high aluminum content, its a wonder any are still extant.

                If its not too much trouble, how did the '32-'34 Pierce-Arrows fare?

                Steve

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                • #23
                  Originally posted by 56H-Y6 View Post
                  Hi Bob

                  Thanks for the look at Marmon, given that only 390 Marmon Sixteens were built, their low value by WWII and their high aluminum content, its a wonder any are still extant.

                  If its not too much trouble, how did the '32-'34 Pierce-Arrows fare? Steve
                  WOW! On the Marmons; I didn't realize so few were built. And right-o on their size and aluminum content; I'll bet half of those extant were simply never "discovered" during the scrap drives or they'd be gone, too.

                  Here's a couple appropriate pages from the Pierce-Arrow section:



                  BP
                  We've got to quit saying, "How stupid can you be?" Too many people are taking it as a challenge.

                  Ayn Rand:
                  "You can avoid reality, but you cannot avoid the consequences of avoiding reality."

                  G. K. Chesterton: This triangle of truisms, of father, mother, and child, cannot be destroyed; it can only destroy those civilizations which disregard it.

                  Comment


                  • #24
                    Hi Bob

                    Thanks for the Pierce-Arrow pages, amazing how much even the April 1934-introduced, lowest-priced 836A depreciated by February-March 1936 to 45% of their factory price. Conspicuously heartbreaking are values assigned to the extensive listing of 1932-1933 LeBaron Salon or Brunn custom-bodied models, represented here in the 1933 Model 1247 listing. Most likely NADA calculated that any of those now highly-desirable cars showing up on the used car market would be lumped together with prices approximately of the factory-bodied seven passenger sedan and limousines i.e. dirt cheap, only fit for livery/commercial use. Magnificent cars available for the same prices of new 1936 medium-priced models such as Studebaker President, Buick Special & Century, Chrysler Deluxe Airstream Eight or Nash Ambassador.

                    Steve

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                    • #25
                      Somewhere, in one of my clutter...ugh...stash of treasures...is a 1948 N.A.D.A. book. (Red cover) I was amazed at the low values of what we would now consider exotic collector cars. I would have to dig it up to confirm, but it seems that after WWII, the post war economy, renewed optimism following victory, pent-up desire for all things "New," like electric record players, musical instruments, televisions, appliances, and especially cars. Folks couldn't abandon the "old" fast enough. Here, in the south, especially rural areas, few had even a concept of a "land fill." Seems like behind every home, or off in nearby woods, there was a gully, trench, or edge of a field, where folks dumped their trash.

                      As a child born in 1944, I recall almost every trek I made through the woods, finding these dumps full of old hand crank Victrola players, wringer washing machines, pump organs, cabinet radios, and even pre-war cars. I may be wrong, but it seems that the most elaborate, exotic, and best built cars, like Cadillac, Packard, Pierce-Arrow, suffered the worst in resale respect. To think of today...what would be a "Picker's" dream of vintage antiques. Even into the 1960's these trash piles were common.

                      These old used car price guides reflect the public mood of their day. Too bad I didn't have the vision to pick through and put aside some of the stuff I stumbled across. My best friend's dad, a hard scrabble entrepreneur, bought a few junk yards in the late '50's and early '60's. Just because I always enjoyed being around old cars, I would go help out in dismantling the cars. It was a mischievous young boy's dream. I got to use things like a cutting torch, wrenches, hammers, and drive a tractor, as we dismantled the cars for scrap. Gee...I didn't even have enough grasp of the future to save some of those cool radiator mascots we so stupidly hammered off as we tore through the junk yard.

                      All that teenage energy unleashed to break windshields, blow up gas tanks, and burn countless piles of starters, generators, and wiring harnesses to salvage the copper. It might have helped my friend's dad pay bills and feed the family, but, in hindsight,...oh well...sigh
                      John Clary
                      Greer, SC

                      SDC member since 1975

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