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Prewar Studebaker Prices nosediving!

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  • Prewar Studebaker Prices nosediving!

    (Well, at least according to the February 17, 1936 Edition of The N.A.D.A. Official Used Car Guide) :



    In the above listings, the Average Sales Price may be understood to be the average Retail sales price of the subject used car as of the book's publication date.

    The Average Value may be understood to be the Wholesale value of the car among fellow dealers.



    Happy New Year. BP
    We've got to quit saying, "How stupid can you be?" Too many people are taking it as a challenge.

    Ayn Rand:
    "You can avoid reality, but you cannot avoid the consequences of avoiding reality."

    G. K. Chesterton: This triangle of truisms, of father, mother, and child, cannot be destroyed; it can only destroy those civilizations which disregard it.

  • #2
    Looks like you could expect to pay $96 for a '29 President roadster. Pretty outrageous!
    Richard Quinn
    Editor emeritus: Antique Studebaker Review

    Comment


    • #3
      Hmm....

      $78 for this:


      Or $90 for this:



      I'll gladly give you $150 for BOTH as a package deal, and take them off your hands!!

      Craig

      Comment


      • #4
        Originally posted by Studebaker Wheel View Post
        Looks like you could expect to pay $96 for a '29 President roadster. Pretty outrageous!
        Agreed, Dick; inflation was simply out of control! BP
        We've got to quit saying, "How stupid can you be?" Too many people are taking it as a challenge.

        Ayn Rand:
        "You can avoid reality, but you cannot avoid the consequences of avoiding reality."

        G. K. Chesterton: This triangle of truisms, of father, mother, and child, cannot be destroyed; it can only destroy those civilizations which disregard it.

        Comment


        • #5
          Bob, You really got us there. Although these are '36 prices, they're still an eye opener.
          Rog
          '59 Lark VI Regal Hardtop
          Smithtown,NY
          Recording Secretary, Long Island Studebaker Club

          Comment


          • #6
            Yes, closed car body design was improving and changing so rapidly in the mid-to-late '30s that the earlier open cars rapidly depreciated in value.

            jack vines
            PackardV8

            Comment


            • #7
              Originally posted by 8E45E View Post
              Hmm....

              $78 for this:


              Or $90 for this:



              I'll gladly give you $150 for BOTH as a package deal, and take them off your hands!!

              Craig
              Great.... I'll take 30 of each model. When can I expect delivery??
              sals54

              Comment


              • #8
                Originally posted by sals54 View Post
                Great.... I'll take 30 of each model. When can I expect delivery??
                Talk to Palma Motors on that one!!

                Craig

                Comment


                • #9
                  yeah, well in '36 they were just old cars. I mean, can anyone here tell me the pine to own a Saturn or a Tarus?

                  Such a disappointing thread. Here I thought there were going to be some real deals on the pre-war cars out there...
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                  Home of the famous Mr. Ed!
                  K.I.S.S. Keep It Simple Studebaker!
                  Ron Smith
                  Where the heck is Fawn Lodge, CA?

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Hi Bob

                    For really shocking revelations in Depression Era depreciation, check the sections for recently defunct luxury makes such as Stutz, Franklin, Marmon, Peerless, Locomobile, Cord L-29, Stearns-Knight......magnificent cars at give-away prices. Even multi-cylinder models of Cadillac, Packard, Auburn, Lincoln, Pierce-Arrow, etc. still in production, unbelievable now.

                    Steve

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Originally posted by 56H-Y6 View Post
                      For really shocking revelations in Depression Era depreciation, check the sections for recently defunct luxury makes such as Stutz, Franklin, Marmon, Peerless, Locomobile, Cord L-29, Stearns-Knight......magnificent cars at give-away prices.
                      It would be interesting to see one from exactly a year earlier when Studebaker was still in receivership, and compare the 1930 prices in this one with the 1929 prices in the 1935 edition. Maybe prices actually went UP when Studebaker was back on the road to financial recovery.

                      Craig

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        How many of those magnificent cars were sacrificed for WWII scrap drives? A good cause, but still sad. Just something else to hold against Hitler, Mussolini and the Imperial Japanese.
                        Poet...Mystic...Soldier of Fortune. As always...self-absorbed, adversarial, cocky and in general a malcontent.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Originally posted by 56H-Y6 View Post
                          Hi Bob

                          For really shocking revelations in Depression Era depreciation, check the sections for recently defunct luxury makes such as Stutz, Franklin, Marmon, Peerless, Locomobile, Cord L-29, Stearns-Knight......magnificent cars at give-away prices. Even multi-cylinder models of Cadillac, Packard, Auburn, Lincoln, Pierce-Arrow, etc. still in production, unbelievable now.

                          Steve
                          For the most part, Steve, if a car wasn't in production in 1935 or thereabouts, it isn't listed in this book. For example, there are no entries for Stutz, Peerless, Locomobile, or Stearns-Knight, among those you cite.

                          There are listings for Marmon, Franklin, and Cord. Here's the Cord page:



                          Not much there, of course, but it supports your theory, for sure. BP
                          We've got to quit saying, "How stupid can you be?" Too many people are taking it as a challenge.

                          Ayn Rand:
                          "You can avoid reality, but you cannot avoid the consequences of avoiding reality."

                          G. K. Chesterton: This triangle of truisms, of father, mother, and child, cannot be destroyed; it can only destroy those civilizations which disregard it.

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Originally posted by 8E45E View Post
                            It would be interesting to see one from exactly a year earlier when Studebaker was still in receivership, and compare the 1930 prices in this one with the 1929 prices in the 1935 edition. Maybe prices actually went UP when Studebaker was back on the road to financial recovery. Craig
                            True, Craig, but this is the only book of this nature I got in a box of old literature I bought at a swap meet years ago. BP
                            We've got to quit saying, "How stupid can you be?" Too many people are taking it as a challenge.

                            Ayn Rand:
                            "You can avoid reality, but you cannot avoid the consequences of avoiding reality."

                            G. K. Chesterton: This triangle of truisms, of father, mother, and child, cannot be destroyed; it can only destroy those civilizations which disregard it.

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Originally posted by BobPalma View Post
                              Here's the Cord page:

                              Then, like now, car prices have always been higher in Canada. Compare the Canadian 1936 list (F.O.B.) prices for comparable Cords.



                              Craig

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