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1964 Moonlight Silver metallic paint help

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  • 1964 Moonlight Silver metallic paint help

    Does anybody have a modern BC/CC equivalent code for the 64 Moonlight silver paint?

    Merry Christmas!
    Dan Giblin
    Cincinnati, OH

  • #2
    My 64 Daytona was originally Moonlight Silver. When I had it painted around 1980, the 1976 Chrysler Platinum Metallic was an almost exact match to the original paint in the trunk. Dupont 43529. That's not exactly "modern", and I have no idea if it helps much, but any auto paint shop can come close from a paint chip or an un-weathered sample of original paint.
    Skip Lackie

    Comment


    • #3
      What Skip said, Dan: Don't mess around trying to find an original formula; it won't mean anything to a supply store mixing modern paint.

      Just find a piece of the car that hasn't been exposed to the sun and take it to whatever paint store you want to mix your color. They can scan it on location and mix a dead-on match for you. BP
      We've got to quit saying, "How stupid can you be?" Too many people are taking it as a challenge.

      Ayn Rand:
      "You can avoid reality, but you cannot avoid the consequences of avoiding reality."

      G. K. Chesterton: This triangle of truisms, of father, mother, and child, cannot be destroyed; it can only destroy those civilizations which disregard it.

      Comment


      • #4
        Here you go Dan:



        From this Website posted in the current 1955 Speedster Color post here.
        http://paintref.com/cgi-bin/colorcod...et+Paint+Codes
        StudeRich
        Second Generation Stude Driver,
        Proud '54 Starliner Owner

        Comment


        • #5
          Those paint codes on the site that Rich posted are from those manufacturers back in the day & not current codes. I needed some paint for my 59 wagon project for jambing in the front end parts. I took off one of the upper hinge covers from a door & the paint shop was able to match it dead on. The old original color formula number has been obsolete for 30 years or so.
          59 Lark wagon, now V-8, H.D. auto!
          60 Lark convertible V-8 auto
          61 Champ 1/2 ton 4 speed
          62 Champ 3/4 ton 5 speed o/drive
          62 Champ 3/4 ton auto
          62 Daytona convertible V-8 4 speed & 62 Cruiser, auto.
          63 G.T. Hawk R-2,4 speed
          63 Avanti (2) R-1 auto
          64 Zip Van
          66 Daytona Sport Sedan(327)V-8 4 speed
          66 Cruiser V-8 auto

          Comment


          • #6
            I assume that the builder of that Website was mainly trying to tie the GM, Ford & Chrysler Factory Color Codes to the Paint Mfg. Codes and showing a Color chip and proper Color Name for reference.

            I think he was hoping that Dupont and PPG could cross them over to Modern Formulas, and we know how difficult and sometimes impossible THAT can be!

            Still a good reference for the proper available Colors in each year.

            I was amazed at all the Truck only available Colors, most of which were never or very seldom used, also many carryovers from Trucks of years gone by. Anyway it was an outstanding effort with no reward, not a seller.
            StudeRich
            Second Generation Stude Driver,
            Proud '54 Starliner Owner

            Comment


            • #7
              Originally posted by BobPalma View Post
              What Skip said, Dan: Don't mess around trying to find an original formula; it won't mean anything to a supply store mixing modern paint.

              Just find a piece of the car that hasn't been exposed to the sun and take it to whatever paint store you want to mix your color. They can scan it on location and mix a dead-on match for you. BP
              Bob, I had great luck doing that on the avanti, it was repainted (prior to me) with a tricoat and it matched great with a SS(for the engine compartment). However, this lark was repainted and I dont trust trust any of the paint left on the car.
              Dan Giblin
              Cincinnati, OH

              Comment


              • #8
                Originally posted by gibbsr1 View Post
                Bob, I had great luck doing that on the Avanti, it was repainted (prior to me) with a tricoat and it matched great with a SS(for the engine compartment). However, this lark was repainted and I dont trust trust any of the paint left on the car.
                Roger that, Dan. How about the underside of the deck lid? Has that been repainted?

                'Good to hear of your working on another Studebaker, Dan. BP
                We've got to quit saying, "How stupid can you be?" Too many people are taking it as a challenge.

                Ayn Rand:
                "You can avoid reality, but you cannot avoid the consequences of avoiding reality."

                G. K. Chesterton: This triangle of truisms, of father, mother, and child, cannot be destroyed; it can only destroy those civilizations which disregard it.

                Comment


                • #9
                  Originally posted by BobPalma View Post
                  What Skip said, Dan: Don't mess around trying to find an original formula; it won't mean anything to a supply store mixing modern paint.

                  Just find a piece of the car that hasn't been exposed to the sun and take it to whatever paint store you want to mix your color. They can scan it on location and mix a dead-on match for you. BP
                  I have to disagree a little. When I tried to have Yellowknife gold matched from a non-faded internal piece I had a long talk with the paint store expert (and he was clearly an expert). He said there were two kinds of paint to go with. As I recall the real sticking point came not so much with the color matching but matching the metallic particle element size. I do not think it would make a ton of difference if a whole car is painted, but I do not not consider it a dead-on match if the metallic part of the equation isn't exact but only guesswork. Maybe there is more to it - but here's what I'd REALLY like to know. Why, with all the persons on the forum that have had matching done and are stating the match is dead on never sharing the formula that was given to them by a modern shop? I've not once seen someone step forward with a modern formula. Everybody always says just go get it matched. Does that mean modern formulas are not consistent from shop to shop or does it mean that persons that have had their color matched "dead-on" are not confident in their assessment of the color, or does it just mean that it's caveat emptor and no-one wants to guide someone wrong? Or (my favorite): are modern formulas so highly prized that no-one wants to give out the secret recipe and save someone a bunch of trouble? Surely by now dozens of Studebaker colors have been matched "dead-on" and the formulas are in dozens of places. Why does everybody have to keep recreating the wheel? Why the secrecy?
                  "Madness...is the exception in individuals, but the rule in groups" - Nietzsche.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    I am guessing that most people NEVER asked for the Formula after their Car was matched. A bad mistake if they ever need it touched up, and certainly not good for the rest of us needing it.

                    I wonder if many Techs would say; well I added a few drops of XXX and several of YYY until it was right, so I don't know!
                    StudeRich
                    Second Generation Stude Driver,
                    Proud '54 Starliner Owner

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Originally posted by Scott View Post
                      I have to disagree a little. When I tried to have Yellowknife gold matched from a non-faded internal piece I had a long talk with the paint store expert (and he was clearly an expert). He said there were two kinds of paint to go with. As I recall the real sticking point came not so much with the color matching but matching the metallic particle element size. I do not think it would make a ton of difference if a whole car is painted, but I do not not consider it a dead-on match if the metallic part of the equation isn't exact but only guesswork. Maybe there is more to it - but here's what I'd REALLY like to know. Why, with all the persons on the forum that have had matching done and are stating the match is dead on never sharing the formula that was given to them by a modern shop? I've not once seen someone step forward with a modern formula. Everybody always says just go get it matched. Does that mean modern formulas are not consistent from shop to shop or does it mean that persons that have had their color matched "dead-on" are not confident in their assessment of the color, or does it just mean that it's caveat emptor and no-one wants to guide someone wrong? Or (my favorite): are modern formulas so highly prized that no-one wants to give out the secret recipe and save someone a bunch of trouble? Surely by now dozens of Studebaker colors have been matched "dead-on" and the formulas are in dozens of places. Why does everybody have to keep recreating the wheel? Why the secrecy?
                      Very true Scott. However there are times when you can hit it almost by accident. Case in point was what I did back in the 80's with a friends Jeep. I was managing a body shop & went in on a Saturday to fix the Jeep. I remember it was a dark, metallic brown. By the time it was ready for color all my paint suppliers were closed so I went to the cabinet & started going through all the left over paint from previous jobs, needs to be darker, add some black and so on. Ended up painting the fender & by sheer chance it matched perfectly! I couldn't have repeated that again if I tried. Using what Rich says in #10 who really keeps account of how many drops of what it took and how much in a drop? The other factor too is how materials have changed. Back when our cars were still being served by the major paint manufacturers regular air dried enamel & acrylic lacquer was the norm. Then acrylic enamels, 2 & 3 stage & now water born. I haven't seen any updates on Ray's page either-http://www.raylinrestoration.com/TechnicalPages/PaintForms.htm Here was an attempt to what is needed.
                      59 Lark wagon, now V-8, H.D. auto!
                      60 Lark convertible V-8 auto
                      61 Champ 1/2 ton 4 speed
                      62 Champ 3/4 ton 5 speed o/drive
                      62 Champ 3/4 ton auto
                      62 Daytona convertible V-8 4 speed & 62 Cruiser, auto.
                      63 G.T. Hawk R-2,4 speed
                      63 Avanti (2) R-1 auto
                      64 Zip Van
                      66 Daytona Sport Sedan(327)V-8 4 speed
                      66 Cruiser V-8 auto

                      Comment

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