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Alloy Wheels From an Abandoned T-Cab Truck Project

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  • Alloy Wheels From an Abandoned T-Cab Truck Project

    Once upon a time I had grand ideas for my, (now long gone), '64 T-Cab including converting to Chevy drums to permit the installation of alloy wheels. I bought the drums and found four decent Lincoln turbine wheels complete with the center caps that could be modified to take a Studebaker logo. This setup would have been ideal for LT 215x75x15 tires and yes, the bolt pattern is 5".

    All I'm trying to get is my investment back of $100.00. Obviously, they're heavy so any shipping would be up to the buyer.

    I hate to drag 'em off to the scrapyard but they are in my way. (Located in Austin, TX)

    Email me at mjrtassoc@gmail.com for more info/pix

  • #2
    there's somebody here looking for a cab....

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    • #3
      All...wheels are an "alloy".
      Some with "ferrous" alloy as a base, some with a "nonferrous" alloy as a base.
      Or...some with various iron materials (steel) as the base, with other "alloys" mixed in.
      Some with various aluminum materials and other "alloys" mixed in.

      The word "Alloy" is just a fancy word for "material", mostly lesser quantity/percentage than the base material, mixed in with base metals.
      Like 1100 series aluminum. It's 99% PURE aluminum. it has no strength as far as aluminum "alloys" go, and...it's not good for much except window garnish/molding. It is one of the best for not reacting with air...or...forming corrosion.
      But add other goodies, or alloys to it...and you can get "various" strengths and other properties, which make it very popular.
      Same mixture goes with the various "steel/iron" available.
      Just thought I'd clear that up a tiny bit.

      Mike

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      • #4
        Hi James, I can't speak for others but not being all that educated in technological terms understood your intention when you referred to the Lincoln turbine wheels as "alloy wheels". And just to make sure I wasn't the "village idiot" found this definition of "alloy wheel".

        The first line of the Wikipedia entry: "Alloy wheels are wheels that are made from an alloy of aluminium or magnesium."

        Mike is correct in his definition of alloy, but those of us that are more grease monkey than engineer or linguist expert will continue to make the mistake
        Mike Lynch
        Sunnyslope, AZ

        "Be kind and civil. Allow that you may be mistaken; allow that others will make mistakes, be gracious. If you're going to contribute, try to make it worthwhile."
        Alan Taylor

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        • #5
          To all that replied, it's easy enough to look up Lincoln turbine wheels before starting a lot of nitpicking.

          For example:

          * http://www.ebay.com/sch/sis.html?_nk...p2047675.m4100http://www.curbsideclassic.com/curbs...me-what-a-car/
          (These are the wheels/caps I have minus the painted accents)

          Maybe trying to be helpful is not the best policy...

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          • #6

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