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  • Sky Hawk 289 225 HP Times

    Is there any information on what the 289 225HP Sky Hawk turned in the Quarter...and 0-60 times? In 1956, 225 horses was pretty respectable horse power....

  • #2
    Might not want to go there.

    In 1956, 225 horses was pretty respectable horse power....
    Very true, the Sky Hawk was a veritable rocket ship in that day and time. If only we could keep blinders on and compare the Sky Hawk only to '56 and earlier cars. Problem is, we live in today and the 1956 acceleration, top speed and fuel economy will seem bog-slow by today's four cylinder front drive minivan standards.

    Actual numbers depended upon the transmission and rear axle ratio in the test car, but most 225hp tests gave 0-60 in 10-11 sec, 17-18 sec 1/4-mile at 75-80 MPH and 105-115 MPH top speed.

    Interestingly, there are some who were there in the day and swear the 1956 289"s were the fastest of all Stude's standard V8s even through '64.

    Of course, it's a racing axiom, "The older I get, the faster I wuz."

    jack vines
    Last edited by PackardV8; 12-18-2015, 11:09 AM.
    PackardV8

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    • #3
      Hey Jack, my late father spoke of driving his '56 Golden Hawk from Scotland to London in circa 4.5 hours with spells of 120mph; with headlights on full beam, he just shone all other traffic off the road. Back in those times, I doubt many UK police cars would have caught up. Of course, gasoline was much cheaper back then!
      Richard
      sigpic

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      • #4
        Interestingly, Tony, the 4bbl 289 was not rated at 225 HP until the 1957 model year.

        The 1956 289 engine had a 7.50:1 or 7.80:1 compression ratio, depending on the source, and was rated at either 190 or 195 HP with a 2bbl carburetor, again depending on the source since Studebaker published 2 figures for the 289's compression ratio and 2bbl HP rating during the 1956 model year.

        Also during the 1956 model year, the 4bbl 289 was rated at 210 HP, not 225, with 4bbl carburetor, regardless of compression ratio.

        For 1957, the compression ratio was bumped to 8.00:1. The engine was then rated at 210 HP with 2bbl carb, or the more familiar 225 HP with 4bbl carb, which is where it stayed for as long as it was produced. BP
        We've got to quit saying, "How stupid can you be?" Too many people are taking it as a challenge.

        Ayn Rand:
        "You can avoid reality, but you cannot avoid the consequences of avoiding reality."

        G. K. Chesterton: This triangle of truisms, of father, mother, and child, cannot be destroyed; it can only destroy those civilizations which disregard it.

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        • #5
          Here are my own actual Timeslips from back in the day.
          This was a '57 Silver Hawk , T86 OD , 3:91 rear , with 8.15/15 Goodyear Double Eagles , 2 bbl .
          I drove it from Daytona to the track , an 80 mile one way trip . I cobbled up a floor shift from
          the local speed shop ( still have most of it ! ). I was dumber than a box of rocks , and I don't think that I
          ever got the best out of the set up . I liked rpm , and undoubtedly left some ET on the table as a result .

          60's Time Slips-II by Bill H, on Flickr
          Bill H
          Daytona Beach
          SDC member since 1970
          Owner of The Skeeter Hawk .

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          • #6
            Originally posted by packard352 View Post
            Hey Jack, my late father spoke of driving his '56 Golden Hawk from Scotland to London in circa 4.5 hours with spells of 120mph;
            Not surprising, as the 275hp Golden Hawk was tested at 120+ MPH by several magazines of the day. Also not surprising the 210hp Sky Hawk was not quite as fast.

            '57 Silver Hawk , T86 OD , 3:91 rear , with 8.15/15 Goodyear Double Eagles , 2 bbl . (average 17 sec @ 80 MPH) again appears to be the best 210hp can be, as that transmission and C-body was the quickest combo. Did yours have TwinTraction?

            jack vines
            PackardV8

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            • #7
              Yes , that car had twin Traction. Even with that , though , those hard as nails stock 6.70-15's were useless, so
              that led to the big Goodyears , which were recaps that I helped to do myself , at the local Goodyear dealers shop.
              I am guessing at the Goodyear size , and it may have been bigger than stated . Old memories = foggy .
              They had the inner liners , with a separate inflate hole , that used a basketball type inflater , and were heavy .
              Whatever size , they effectively raised the rear ratio a bit though .
              I also beat up the center mount on the 2 piece driveshaft now and then . The rubber biscuits have their limits .
              All of this was in 1963 , and products were just not available or even known about , as they are today.
              .
              Bill H
              Daytona Beach
              SDC member since 1970
              Owner of The Skeeter Hawk .

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              • #8
                Jeez. I better not break Bill's time with the 55 or they'll think it was a miracle
                Dave Warren (Perry Mason by day, Perry Como by night)

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by shifter4 View Post
                  Yes , that car had twin Traction. Even with that , though , those hard as nails stock 6.70-15's were useless, so
                  that led to the big Goodyears , which were recaps that I helped to do myself , at the local Goodyear dealers shop.
                  I am guessing at the Goodyear size , and it may have been bigger than stated . Old memories = foggy .
                  They had the inner liners , with a separate inflate hole , that used a basketball type inflater , and were heavy .
                  Whatever size , they effectively raised the rear ratio a bit though .
                  I also beat up the center mount on the 2 piece driveshaft now and then . The rubber biscuits have their limits .
                  All of this was in 1963 , and products were just not available or even known about , as they are today.
                  .
                  A bit foggy here also but IIRC our 265 Chevy 55 post ran about the same times. Atlas Bucrons were the traction tires of the era with a bit of over bore and milling to up compression. All legal in the rules of the day. Golly, I miss those days. Bob
                  , ,

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                  • #10
                    a bit of over bore and milling to up compression. All legal in the rules of the day. Golly, I miss those days.
                    A car geared low, the engine built and the suspension set up for the quarter-mile is going to be way quicker/faster than the same car as delivered to the customer by a dealer.

                    Our friend Alan here ran Studes for years and turned some unbelievable times with a car which fit the rules of the stock class. And none can ever forget all those years the Chicken Hawk was winning its class at the NHRA Nationals, running quicker/faster than any stock 232" before or since.

                    jack vines
                    PackardV8

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                    • #11
                      Bob, "Atlas Bucrons were the traction tires of the era". 110% correct. As a kid I worked at an Amoco station in Balto putting on new Atlas Plycrons and taking off worn out Atlas Bucrons. The Bucrons were as soft as a pink rubber erasers hence the great off the line traction. As the word got around a lot of guys (me included) had a pair mounted on wheels ready for track or street racing.
                      ed ellis

                      sigpic

                      the "SUPER COUPE"

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                      • #12
                        The great thing about the Bucrons on the street was that they left no black streaks on the street when you layed on it. When the cops heard the squeals and showed up, they couldn't see what car did it...

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                        • #13
                          In 1968 I had a 4bbl 289 out of a 58 president in My Lark. I used this engine for transportation when the R2 was out of the car for numerous reasons. I ran at the strip with this engine several times. Speed and ET was limited by valvesprings that would not maintain valve train compliance above 4500 RPM. Shifting at 4500 My best pass was 16.12 @ 84 MPH with a 4.09 gear and wide ratio 4-speed on Goodyear 70 series tires.

                          Jim
                          james r pepper

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                          • #14
                            Just for the record, here's HotRod's writeup on Ted's car. Well done, me thinks. The only thing I didn't recall about those days were traction bars, IIRC we used a couple of extra spring leafs. The bars had to be OK because anyone with his record was getting tech inspected on a regular basis.

                            http://www.hotrod.com/cars/featured/...arlight-coupe/ Bob
                            , ,

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                            • #15
                              Originally posted by ed ellis View Post
                              Bob, "Atlas Bucrons were the traction tires of the era". 110% correct. As a kid I worked at an Amoco station in Balto putting on new Atlas Plycrons and taking off worn out Atlas Bucrons. The Bucrons were as soft as a pink rubber erasers hence the great off the line traction. As the word got around a lot of guys (me included) had a pair mounted on wheels ready for track or street racing.
                              I preferred the Goodyear Butyls, I still have a set of 6.70X15 Whitewalls's, as gummy as erasers!
                              StudeRich
                              Second Generation Stude Driver,
                              Proud '54 Starliner Owner

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