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you cant fix stupid....

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  • you cant fix stupid....

    A buddy of mine came to me a few months back asking me to look at his Honda accord that wouldn't run. After closer inspection it was determined he needed and new timing belt. Honda accords have interference motor's so it bent valves after the timing belt broke. HE wanted to replace the head at later date...


    To make a long story short this is the damage a bent valve did to the piston. This is the result of someone who didn't want to repair their car the correct way.

    Now the car is off to the salvage yard its beyond repair... The value of the car isn't worth keeping it around.

    total cost of repairs $3,000 to replace motor in a $500 dollar car.

    Click image for larger version

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    "trying to save them from the crusher one at a time"

  • #2
    A good post for the "Stove Huggers" Forum.

    Is it a Dumb Guy, a Dumb ENGINE, or BOTH? Lol!

    That's an interesting design, I see that the cylinders are cooled ALL the way to the Top where the most Heat is. The downside being, they have very little support, unlike a Stude. Engine.
    StudeRich
    Second Generation Stude Driver,
    Proud '54 Starliner Owner

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    • #3
      I do not know why this is in the Studebaker part of the Forum.

      Missing facts are the age of the Honda and the mileage on the Honda. My neighbor is selling his Honda Accord after 218K miles. It still looks good in and out and runs fine.
      Gary L.
      Wappinger, NY

      SDC member since 1968
      Studebaker enthusiast much longer

      Comment


      • #4
        OK I get it I posted in the wrong section.... I just dont know how to move it sorry..

        about the car its a 1995 Honda accord ex 245,000 miles
        "trying to save them from the crusher one at a time"

        Comment


        • #5
          Originally posted by Restobaker View Post
          OK I get it I posted in the wrong section.... I just dont know how to move it sorry..

          about the car its a 1995 Honda accord ex 245,000 miles
          Hopefully, the moderators will move it. I can understand making the error in the location of the post.

          I think that the car served its owner(s) well. Twenty years and a quarter of a million miles seems like enough to me on what was a pretty basic/lower priced car to start with.
          Gary L.
          Wappinger, NY

          SDC member since 1968
          Studebaker enthusiast much longer

          Comment


          • #6
            Almost all modern engines have a recommended mileage for a new timing belt. Just like regular oil changes, you may be lucky if you push it, or you may not. Non-interference engines easily recover from a t-belt failure; but interference engines can only qualify as boat anchors in the event of failure. Best to read maintenance specs in the owners manual, or find them online, and respect those recommendations. Many of them, in the process of accessing the belt, also access the water pump. It's a downer to pay for a timing belt replacement and then have your pump fail a month or two later and have to pay for that labor all over again. Do them both together, even if the pump shows no issues.
            "All attempts to 'rise above the issue' are simply an excuse to avoid it profitably." --Dick Gregory

            Brad Johnson, SDC since 1975, ASC since 1990
            Pine Grove Mills, Pa.
            sigpic'33 Rockne 10, '51 Commander Starlight, '53 Commander Starlight "Désirée"

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            • #7
              You can't fix stupid....... But you can finance it.
              HTIH (Hope The Info Helps)

              Jeff


              Get your facts first, and then you can distort them as much as you please. Mark Twain



              Note: SDC# 070190 (and earlier...)

              Comment


              • #8
                Originally posted by studegary View Post
                I do not know why this is in the Studebaker part of the Forum.

                Missing facts are the age of the Honda and the mileage on the Honda. My neighbor is selling his Honda Accord after 218K miles. It still looks good in and out and runs fine.
                If he hasn't changed the timing belt at least once, Gary (and preferably twice), the person to whom he is selling it is buying a time bomb. BP
                We've got to quit saying, "How stupid can you be?" Too many people are taking it as a challenge.

                Ayn Rand:
                "You can avoid reality, but you cannot avoid the consequences of avoiding reality."

                G. K. Chesterton: This triangle of truisms, of father, mother, and child, cannot be destroyed; it can only destroy those civilizations which disregard it.

                Comment


                • #9
                  Well...I don't think you could blame anything about the design or quality of the engine for this circumstance. The shear numbers of them on the road, numbers sold, and trouble free miles driven is all the proof needed. Lack of keeping the maintenance protocol is the culprit here. As for this engine, I would never trust it after this kind of trauma. Even if you had the tools, mechanical ability, and a buddy in the parts business giving you a hefty discount on parts, the way these little engines are constructed, I'd always be wondering what collateral damage went undetected.

                  Instead, I would probably try to buy a complete engine out of a wreck, install a new timing belt, run it on a stand, and if all checked out, put it in the car and keep on driving it. If the car is, otherwise, in great shape, you could make a great "beater" driver out of it.

                  I kinda feel sorry for that little broken piston...looks a lot like this, as if it were crying out in pain.
                  John Clary
                  Greer, SC

                  SDC member since 1975

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Originally posted by jclary View Post
                    Well...I don't think you could blame anything about the design or quality of the engine for this circumstance. The shear numbers of them on the road, numbers sold, and trouble free miles driven is all the proof needed. Lack of keeping the maintenance protocol is the culprit here. As for this engine, I would never trust it after this kind of trauma. Even if you had the tools, mechanical ability, and a buddy in the parts business giving you a hefty discount on parts, the way these little engines are constructed, I'd always be wondering what collateral damage went undetected.

                    Instead, I would probably try to buy a complete engine out of a wreck, install a new timing belt, run it on a stand, and if all checked out, put it in the car and keep on driving it. If the car is, otherwise, in great shape, you could make a great "beater" driver out of it.

                    I kinda feel sorry for that little broken piston...looks a lot like this, as if it were crying out in pain.

                    Sadly this little car was great before he got ahold of it .

                    It has been wrecked and rebuilt twice, once he hit a parked trailer and the other a parked car. So needless to say I think this poor car has had a very long life.

                    The kid that owns it drives it til it breaks, then pays me to get it running again this time I wont fix it.....

                    The car has a lot of problems and is filled with old trash. I'm afraid to even open the door the smell is so bad.
                    "trying to save them from the crusher one at a time"

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      If it's really a $500 car, a junkyard engine would cost less than that. The "stupid" part is allowing the timing belt to break.

                      I play around with older Honda Gen II Civics and drive one daily as they are super reliable so long as you pay attention to basic maintenance such as monitoring fluids, hoses etc.

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                      • #12
                        Most Honda aluminum engines are "open deck" and will run 300K miles so long as you do basic maintenance. Some of the earlier engines were "old school" cast iron blocks that went away in the late 1980's as far as I know.

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                        • #13
                          So, how often should I change the timing belt on my 64 GT Hawk (R-2)....I did change both of it's muffler belts last week....It wasn't too difficult....if I can do it, so can you.
                          Lou Van Anne
                          62 Champ
                          64 R2 GT Hawk
                          79 Avanti II

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                          • #14
                            Studebaker timing belts are getting very hard to find.
                            Skip Lackie

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                            • #15
                              My mother bought a new Honda Accord back in 1986. One day I get a call that the car was making funny noises and she pulled over in a parking lot afraid to start it back up. This car at the time was only two years old with about 25,000 miles. I called AAA and had it towed to the local Honda dealer. The timing belt had indeed broken, but thank goodness there was no engine damage. The point is that this car was not ready for a scheduled timing belt change yet it broke. She was very lucky.
                              Joe Roberts
                              '61 R1 Champ
                              '65 Cruiser
                              Eastern North Carolina Chapter

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