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you cant fix stupid....

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  • #16
    I worked on a beater car with similar damage. All I did was replace a piston from a pull-a-part j-jard. A single piston cost around $15. I ran a hone really quick on the cylinder while the engine was still in the car. Did not even change the rings. Not perfect by any means, but it was only for a 20 mile a day commute to college. It only had to last 2 years. It was later sold still running.

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    • #17
      Originally posted by alex54 View Post
      I worked on a beater car with similar damage. All I did was replace a piston from a pull-a-part j-jard. A single piston cost around $15. I ran a hone really quick on the cylinder while the engine was still in the car. Did not even change the rings. Not perfect by any means, but it was only for a 20 mile a day commute to college. It only had to last 2 years. It was later sold still running.
      Great post. You pass my "you're gonna make it" test. Youngsters who "earn" their way, are to be cheered on, and encouraged. I too, after surviving a war, fought long odds to get into college (at age 24), with no family monetary support, nor encouragement. For my school commuter, I drove an old beater Valiant. For paint, it was coated with a combination of bird droppings and pine sap. Hopefully, more will come along who know more than how to play a video game or text meaningless drivel to their shallow friends.

      Best to you. Glad to have you among our group.
      John Clary
      Greer, SC

      SDC member since 1975

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      • #18
        I believe Most american V8s are "interference" if the timing chain or sprocket plastic overlay (or gear) breaks.
        It used to be that getting 100 kmiles out of a timing chain was a rarity, but announced advanced wear by running poorly.

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        • #19
          What John Clary said. BP
          We've got to quit saying, "How stupid can you be?" Too many people are taking it as a challenge.

          Ayn Rand:
          "You can avoid reality, but you cannot avoid the consequences of avoiding reality."

          G. K. Chesterton: This triangle of truisms, of father, mother, and child, cannot be destroyed; it can only destroy those civilizations which disregard it.

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          • #20
            Originally posted by Skip Lackie View Post
            Studebaker timing belts are getting very hard to find.
            ....you ought to try finding the muffler belts!
            Lou Van Anne
            62 Champ
            64 R2 GT Hawk
            79 Avanti II

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            • #21
              Originally posted by Lou Van Anne View Post
              ....you ought to try finding the muffler belts!
              Here you go.
              But this is for side exhausts. Standard rear exhaust would need to be modified slightly.
              Attached Files

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              • #22
                The blinker fluid leaked out of my right front turn signal on my 59 Lark. Now it only comes on every so often.

                On.........off...........on..........off...........on.............off. It's pretty consistent on timing though.
                Dis-Use on a Car is Worse Than Mis-Use...
                1959 Studebaker Lark VIII 2DHTP

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                • #23
                  Click image for larger version

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ID:	1701744.........
                  "All attempts to 'rise above the issue' are simply an excuse to avoid it profitably." --Dick Gregory

                  Brad Johnson, SDC since 1975, ASC since 1990
                  Pine Grove Mills, Pa.
                  sigpic'33 Rockne 10, '51 Commander Starlight, '53 Commander Starlight "Désirée"

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                  • #24
                    Originally posted by rockne10 View Post
                    [ATTACH=CONFIG]49960[/ATTACH].........
                    I looked, but didn't see any grease zerks?
                    Lou Van Anne
                    62 Champ
                    64 R2 GT Hawk
                    79 Avanti II

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                    • #25
                      Originally posted by rockne10 View Post
                      Almost all modern engines have a recommended mileage for a new timing belt.
                      Typically it is (or has been) 60,000 miles. However, California has some clause where new cars need to to go 100,000 miles before such service. At least on my 2000 Mazda Protege, 1.6 (non-interference thankfully) if it is a 49 state car the interval is 60,000 miles. If it is a California car it is 105,000 miles. Ironically it is the very same belt with two difference change intervals. So, it kind of begs the question do the other 49 stated really need to change the belt so frequently... - or are California cars pushing it to the extreme limit - with risks?

                      Most belts are made off-shore (not USA made) and they are subject to climate change effects. Oh..., wait..., that's right this thread originated in the wrong section.
                      '64 Lark Type, powered by '85 Corvette L-98 (carburetor), 700R4, - CASO to the Max.

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                      • #26
                        Originally posted by rockne10 View Post
                        Almost all modern engines have a recommended mileage for a new timing belt.
                        Typically it is (or has been) 60,000 miles. However, California has some clause where new cars need to to go 100,000 miles before such service. At least on my 2000 Mazda Protege, 1.6 (non-interference thankfully) if it is a 49 state car the interval is 60,000 miles. If it is a California car it is 105,000 miles. Ironically it is the very same belt with two difference change intervals. So, it kind of begs the question do the other 49 stated really need to change the belt so frequently... - or are California cars pushing it to the extreme limit - with risks? Most belts are made off-shore (not USA made) and they are subject to climate change effects. Oh..., wait..., that's right this thread originated in the wrong section.

                        BTW, while we can only see the three first cylinders I see no strikes on the intake side. And the damage looks to be beyond just bending a valve. It looks more like a piston melt down. Given that the engine would have stopped nearly immediately I would expect to see sharp edged breakage on the piston.
                        '64 Lark Type, powered by '85 Corvette L-98 (carburetor), 700R4, - CASO to the Max.

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                        • #27
                          Most belts are made off-shore (not USA made) and they are subject to climate change effects. Oh..., wait..., that's right this thread originated in the wrong section.
                          no one ever accused me of being the sharpest tool in the shed ...
                          "trying to save them from the crusher one at a time"

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                          • #28
                            Originally posted by wittsend View Post
                            Typically it is (or has been) 60,000 miles. However, California has some clause where new cars need to to go 100,000 miles before such service. At least on my 2000 Mazda Protege, 1.6 (non-interference thankfully) if it is a 49 state car the interval is 60,000 miles. If it is a California car it is 105,000 miles. Ironically it is the very same belt with two difference change intervals. So, it kind of begs the question do the other 49 stated really need to change the belt so frequently... - or are California cars pushing it to the extreme limit - with risks? Most belts are made off-shore (not USA made) and they are subject to climate change effects. Oh..., wait..., that's right this thread originated in the wrong section.

                            BTW, while we can only see the three first cylinders I see no strikes on the intake side. And the damage looks to be beyond just bending a valve. It looks more like a piston melt down. Given that the engine would have stopped nearly immediately I would expect to see sharp edged breakage on the piston.

                            The car drove to my house on three cylinders. its not locked up by any means. when I pulled the head off I found pieces of the valve that broke.
                            Attached Files
                            "trying to save them from the crusher one at a time"

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                            • #29
                              Maybe the belt skipped a tooth rather than broke? Otherwise the car could not have run with a broken belt. My nephew had a Honda CRX. He was pretty much idling through a parking lot and all the teeth stripped off at the bottom of the belt at the lower pulley. It immediately stopped. Ironically I just checked and his engine was an interference engine. Regardless I just replaced the belt and the car ran fine. One in a million?

                              BTW, I was poking fun at the Climate Change and Made in the USA threads many of us have participated in - I hadn't intended to give you a hard time about posting in "specifics."
                              '64 Lark Type, powered by '85 Corvette L-98 (carburetor), 700R4, - CASO to the Max.

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                              • #30
                                The car was on the highway when the timing belt broke the first time. we replaced the belt and got the car running but it had a heavy miss and lose of power. After we did a compression test it was found the car had a vent valve. The gentlemen was advised of this but wanted to drive the car until he got the funds to replace the head. Two week later he calls me and says it lost all power and wont run. When I arrive to his house the car is running a but barley. he drives it to my house smoking and clattering I told him its done but ill pull the head to see if I could still fix it. After pulling the head we found the busted valve.
                                "trying to save them from the crusher one at a time"

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