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Help identifying the model of these bones? 1912-1935?

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  • Help identifying the model of these bones? 1912-1935?

    IMG_3201.jpgstudebaker.jpgMy husband and I just purchased a piece of land just outside of Eugene, OR. While clearing up the debris from what had been logged we came across the bones of an old Studebaker. It is almost fully decomposed but we find it quite intriguing none the less. We have been scouring the internet trying to place the model but have not quite found one with all the same matching parts. We do know that the last time this area was logged was around 80 years ago, or 1935. We think it may have been a truck, but unsure.
    We are not quite sure where to look. We thought someone on here may be able to help identify it or clue us into to what parts to look at. What's left is (pardon my ignorance on the names):
    *the front where the windshield should be, which opens, and includes the outside air vent and a visor over the top,
    *the back where the back windshield should be, there is still some wood where it looks like the roof would connect the front to the back
    * two engine hood panels with a double row of vents,
    * two wheel covers, and what looks to be a tailgate.
    *two doors
    *what looks to be a tailgate?
    *and there was a piece of a tall grill, a headlight and a large piece of metal that is so mangled I cannot make out where it belongs, nearby that may or may not be from the same car.
    What has caught my eye as interesting is the double vents on the engine hood, I can't seem to place this with any Studebaker models- which seem to have one larger row of vents instead of two smaller rows. There is one plaque mounted to the front, where the engine would be marked 53-W-1 and below that 10065, but we cannot place those numbers anywhere. There is also a maintenance plaque on the inside drivers side with the turning wheel logo (so maybe it was made 1912-1935).
    I have attached a picture collage if you wouldn't mind taking a look. Anything that might stand out to you may be helpful in our search.
    Last edited by myco; 10-19-2015, 11:05 AM. Reason: added another photo

  • #2
    I think that may be a 1930 4dr sedan. The tag stamped with 53-W-1 indicates the model. However, there maybe parts from more than 1 vehicle there. Someone with more knowledge of pre-war cars will be sure to chime in.
    sigpic
    Jeff in ND

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    • #3
      Mr Quinn should step up soon with better answers but many passenger cars were converted to trucks in that era so it was possible a 30 four door sedan converted to a working truck. Any indications it might have been used as a sawmill? Steve
      sigpic

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      • #4
        Jeff is on the right track. Many of the parts belong to a 1930 Studebaker Erskine later called the Studebaker Six. The car was produced from Nov 1929 thru May 9, 1930 as the Erskine and from May 10 to November 1930 as the Studebaker Six. The body symbol 53 W1 identifies it further as a Regular 4 door sedan with Mohair upholstery and no side mounts. Judging by the high body number, 10065, I am sure that this was the later series. It was the lowest priced Studebaker available at the time with an original base price of $895. As a result it was a top seller with 22,371 sold in both series. Below a photo of what the car looked like when new. Note the hood louvers do not match those in one of your photos so that hood would not have been on the Studebaker. Yes, it was common to convert cars to trucks once they had become older so if that were done it may have been in the mid to late 30s. Bottom line your "new" car is a 1930 Studebaker Six model 53 4-door sedan. Congratulations, will be looking forward to seeing it restored and at a local show soon!

        six handicapped labeled.jpg
        Richard Quinn
        Editor emeritus: Antique Studebaker Review

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        • #5
          Originally posted by Studebaker Wheel View Post
          Congratulations, will be looking forward to seeing it restored and at a local show soon!

          [ATTACH=CONFIG]48528[/ATTACH]
          It will buff out.
          A little bit of "Lark Shine" and it will look good.
          South Lompoc Studebaker

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          • #6
            Wow, You guys are Amazing! Thank you so much for responding. Now, off with the metal detector to see if there are any more parts to it buried out there...now it's a treasure hunt

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            • #7
              Originally posted by myco View Post
              Now, off with the metal detector to see if there are any more parts to it buried out there...now it's a treasure hunt
              I bet Richard Quinn will be over there right away with his metal detector and help out!!

              Craig

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              • #8
                Maybe you'll get really lucky and find the battery hold down.

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                • #9
                  It would be a good vehicle to do a "Beverly Hillbillies" car, although that was a 1920 Oldsmobile. Of course, today, you couldn't put Granny on the top in a rocking chair. Safety cops you know.

                  Have fun finding things. Put on your Indiana Jones hat and go digging.

                  Bob Miles
                  Tucson AZ

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                  • #10
                    Rat Rod!!!!!
                    Jon Stalnaker
                    Karel Staple Chapter SDC

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                    • #11
                      Just in time for HALLOWEEN!

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