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Value of a Studebaker wagon

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  • Value of a Studebaker wagon

    No, not a Lark, Wagonaire, Conestoga, Parkview, etc., but a real horse drawn wagon. I have bought 3 horse drawn buggies, but this will be my first foray into a wagon. Anyone know someone who can provide guidance on price and what problem areas to look for?



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  • #2
    You might want to contact Marlen Halvorson. He usually has an ad in TW (under flocks). He deals in wagons.

    If you can't find his contact information, drop me an e-mail via this forum.

    Gord Richmond, within Weasel range of the Alberta Badlands
    Gord Richmond, within Weasel range of the Alberta Badlands

    Comment


    • #3
      You might want to contact Marlen Halvorson. He usually has an ad in TW (under flocks). He deals in wagons.

      If you can't find his contact information, drop me an e-mail via this forum.

      Gord Richmond, within Weasel range of the Alberta Badlands
      Gord Richmond, within Weasel range of the Alberta Badlands

      Comment


      • #4
        I have a farm wagon but it is not a Studebaker. I want to put it together some day but the farmer who stored it in his barn propped the wooden axles up against the wall and the ends were on the dirt floor. One end of each axle is rotted. That would be one concern.

        Here is a picture of some of the wheels. As you can see...my garage looks almost as cluttered as yours!



        Leonard Shepherd
        http://leonardshepherd.com/

        Comment


        • #5
          I have a farm wagon but it is not a Studebaker. I want to put it together some day but the farmer who stored it in his barn propped the wooden axles up against the wall and the ends were on the dirt floor. One end of each axle is rotted. That would be one concern.

          Here is a picture of some of the wheels. As you can see...my garage looks almost as cluttered as yours!



          Leonard Shepherd
          http://leonardshepherd.com/

          Comment


          • #6
            Guido, I have owned several wagons while we were farming in Kansas. Up there the narrow wood wheel wagons were called "Wood Wagons", here in Texas we call them "Butcher Knife" Wagons. The wider, heavier wood wheel wagons are called frieght wagons here in Texas. In Kansas 5 years ago a good clean Wood Wheel Wagon would sell at farm sales from 1500 to $3000. I only saw one Stude wagon sell while I was in Kansas that I can recall. The main (expensive) thing to watch for is the condition of the wheels. There are wheelwrights out in your country as you are probably aware of. There are a couple in Kansas and a couple here in Texas. Prices on wagons here in Texas are quite higher as every cowboy wannabe wants a chuckwagon. By the way, the only new vehicle my Rancher Grandfather ever owned was a Studebaker Wagon, never owned anything that required gas or deisel. Lastly there is a huge horse and horse drawn implement sale in Kingman Kansas every spring, good source for wagons, wagon parts, harness and a team of Mules to pull that Stude Wagon.

            Bill Elbert

            59 4E11
            58 Champion
            57 3E11
            48 M16
            46 M15
            41 M5

            Comment


            • #7
              Guido, I have owned several wagons while we were farming in Kansas. Up there the narrow wood wheel wagons were called "Wood Wagons", here in Texas we call them "Butcher Knife" Wagons. The wider, heavier wood wheel wagons are called frieght wagons here in Texas. In Kansas 5 years ago a good clean Wood Wheel Wagon would sell at farm sales from 1500 to $3000. I only saw one Stude wagon sell while I was in Kansas that I can recall. The main (expensive) thing to watch for is the condition of the wheels. There are wheelwrights out in your country as you are probably aware of. There are a couple in Kansas and a couple here in Texas. Prices on wagons here in Texas are quite higher as every cowboy wannabe wants a chuckwagon. By the way, the only new vehicle my Rancher Grandfather ever owned was a Studebaker Wagon, never owned anything that required gas or deisel. Lastly there is a huge horse and horse drawn implement sale in Kingman Kansas every spring, good source for wagons, wagon parts, harness and a team of Mules to pull that Stude Wagon.

              Bill Elbert

              59 4E11
              58 Champion
              57 3E11
              48 M16
              46 M15
              41 M5

              Comment


              • #8
                Jack Cooper who lives in NJ and whose family were Studebaker dealers for a very long time is also a good source of information on wagon and carriage prices for Studebaker equipment. He has quite a collection of them.

                See you in the future as I write about our past
                sigpicSee you in the future as I write about our past

                Comment


                • #9
                  Jack Cooper who lives in NJ and whose family were Studebaker dealers for a very long time is also a good source of information on wagon and carriage prices for Studebaker equipment. He has quite a collection of them.

                  See you in the future as I write about our past
                  sigpicSee you in the future as I write about our past

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    You might try to contact the American Driving Society. They have a web site. They also might be able to put you in contact with a local club who could help you.

                    http://www.americandrivingsociety.org/

                    The American Driving Society
                    PO Box 278
                    1837 Ludden Dr Ste B-120
                    Cross Plains, WI 53528
                    phone: 608-237-7382
                    fax: 608-237-6468


                    Often the wheels and floors are the biggest problems. It would be wise to go over anything that has a nut or bolt from time to time to check for tightness.

                    The wheels typically get loose in the fellowes and hubs. The fellowes are the wooden part that the tyre is attached to. The spokes are attached (the wide space) and then they are inserted into the hub. since the fellowes, spokes and sometimes the hub are wood, they have a tendency to shrink and warp. Often a loose wheel can be cured by tightening the bolts on a metal hub. If the hub is wood, they must be shimmed. NEVER soak a wheel to tighten it. This causes the wood to compress in the loose joint and makes the problem worse. If a wheel is dished, that is to say, it has cupped outward, then the spokes are warped. There should be some dish to a wheel. This assists in handling the load in the carriage or wagon. Checking to make sure if the spokes are warped is easy. simply look at the angle from the ground to the hub on the spoke. If this is straight, the spoke is fine and the dish is intentional. If the spoke is warped, the hub will be ahead or behind the rim of the fellowes.

                    You are in an excellent location for help, Guido. The Pennsylvania Dutch, or Amish, can service any part of your buggies that are in need of it. Contact the A.D.S. for help in finding a local chapter, or driving club. They would be happy, I'm sure, to assist you.

                    Good luck! I wish I was further east and still into driving horses. It would be a ton of fun showing you just how much fun driving horse-drawn Studebakers can be!



                    Home of the famous Mr. Ed!
                    Lotsa Larks!
                    K.I.S.S. Keep It Simple Studebaker!
                    Ron Smith
                    Where the heck is Lewiston, CA?
                    Home of the famous Mr. Ed!
                    K.I.S.S. Keep It Simple Studebaker!
                    Ron Smith
                    Where the heck is Fawn Lodge, CA?

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      You might try to contact the American Driving Society. They have a web site. They also might be able to put you in contact with a local club who could help you.

                      http://www.americandrivingsociety.org/

                      The American Driving Society
                      PO Box 278
                      1837 Ludden Dr Ste B-120
                      Cross Plains, WI 53528
                      phone: 608-237-7382
                      fax: 608-237-6468


                      Often the wheels and floors are the biggest problems. It would be wise to go over anything that has a nut or bolt from time to time to check for tightness.

                      The wheels typically get loose in the fellowes and hubs. The fellowes are the wooden part that the tyre is attached to. The spokes are attached (the wide space) and then they are inserted into the hub. since the fellowes, spokes and sometimes the hub are wood, they have a tendency to shrink and warp. Often a loose wheel can be cured by tightening the bolts on a metal hub. If the hub is wood, they must be shimmed. NEVER soak a wheel to tighten it. This causes the wood to compress in the loose joint and makes the problem worse. If a wheel is dished, that is to say, it has cupped outward, then the spokes are warped. There should be some dish to a wheel. This assists in handling the load in the carriage or wagon. Checking to make sure if the spokes are warped is easy. simply look at the angle from the ground to the hub on the spoke. If this is straight, the spoke is fine and the dish is intentional. If the spoke is warped, the hub will be ahead or behind the rim of the fellowes.

                      You are in an excellent location for help, Guido. The Pennsylvania Dutch, or Amish, can service any part of your buggies that are in need of it. Contact the A.D.S. for help in finding a local chapter, or driving club. They would be happy, I'm sure, to assist you.

                      Good luck! I wish I was further east and still into driving horses. It would be a ton of fun showing you just how much fun driving horse-drawn Studebakers can be!



                      Home of the famous Mr. Ed!
                      Lotsa Larks!
                      K.I.S.S. Keep It Simple Studebaker!
                      Ron Smith
                      Where the heck is Lewiston, CA?
                      Home of the famous Mr. Ed!
                      K.I.S.S. Keep It Simple Studebaker!
                      Ron Smith
                      Where the heck is Fawn Lodge, CA?

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Ron,

                        Thanks for the information, that helps me a lot in knowing what to look for. Does anything stand out on these photos other than the cracked hubs)?

                        Gary





                        Join me in removing narcissists, trolls, self annoited "experts" and general idiots via the Ignore button.

                        The official SDC Forum heel nipper ���

                        �Middle age is when your broad mind and narrow waist begin to change places.� E. Joseph Cossman

                        For every mile of road, there are 2 miles of ditch. ���

                        "All lies matter - fight the kleptocracy"

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Ron,

                          Thanks for the information, that helps me a lot in knowing what to look for. Does anything stand out on these photos other than the cracked hubs)?

                          Gary





                          Join me in removing narcissists, trolls, self annoited "experts" and general idiots via the Ignore button.

                          The official SDC Forum heel nipper ���

                          �Middle age is when your broad mind and narrow waist begin to change places.� E. Joseph Cossman

                          For every mile of road, there are 2 miles of ditch. ���

                          "All lies matter - fight the kleptocracy"

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Nice freight wagon, Guido! Looks to be the type that was usually run with a second behind. Kinda like the double, or tandem, trucks that one sees on the freeway.

                            Your wheels seem straight and true. The cracks aren't a serious concern as long as they aren't too very large. The bands or metal straps around the hubs need to be tight. If they are loose in any way, the spokes will slop around thereby ruining the hubs. Can't tell much from these pictures though, the clairity on my screen isn't the best. How does the fifth-wheel look?

                            I can't imagine you'd want to spend much time driving around in this. The suspension (or lack there of) produces a ride that leaves something to be desired. Unlike your buggies which probably ride better than most compact cars (and look better too).[8D]


                            Home of the famous Mr. Ed!
                            Lotsa Larks!
                            K.I.S.S. Keep It Simple Studebaker!
                            Ron Smith
                            Where the heck is Lewiston, CA?
                            Home of the famous Mr. Ed!
                            K.I.S.S. Keep It Simple Studebaker!
                            Ron Smith
                            Where the heck is Fawn Lodge, CA?

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Nice freight wagon, Guido! Looks to be the type that was usually run with a second behind. Kinda like the double, or tandem, trucks that one sees on the freeway.

                              Your wheels seem straight and true. The cracks aren't a serious concern as long as they aren't too very large. The bands or metal straps around the hubs need to be tight. If they are loose in any way, the spokes will slop around thereby ruining the hubs. Can't tell much from these pictures though, the clairity on my screen isn't the best. How does the fifth-wheel look?

                              I can't imagine you'd want to spend much time driving around in this. The suspension (or lack there of) produces a ride that leaves something to be desired. Unlike your buggies which probably ride better than most compact cars (and look better too).[8D]


                              Home of the famous Mr. Ed!
                              Lotsa Larks!
                              K.I.S.S. Keep It Simple Studebaker!
                              Ron Smith
                              Where the heck is Lewiston, CA?
                              Home of the famous Mr. Ed!
                              K.I.S.S. Keep It Simple Studebaker!
                              Ron Smith
                              Where the heck is Fawn Lodge, CA?

                              Comment

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