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  • War time Stude in the snow

    Does anybody know anything else about this. It is just short article and give very little detail. It could be interesting. Sure would like to see a picture of the car itself.

    http://query.nytimes.com/gst/abstrac...649C946997D6CF



    Joe Roberts
    '61 R1 Champ
    '65 Cruiser
    Editor of "The Down Easterner"
    Eastern North Carolina Chapter
    Joe Roberts
    '61 R1 Champ
    '65 Cruiser
    Eastern North Carolina Chapter

  • #2
    The article below is even more interesting.

    Take out 'dime store novel' and put in 'violent video games,' 'gansta rap' or other list of modern ills people point to in society today and it could have been written last week.

    That is, except for the kid being accused of stealing $2.25...

    <div align="left">1960 Lark VI</div id="left"> <div align="right">1962 7E7-122</div id="right">
    [img=left]http://i96.photobucket.com/albums/l163/62champ/car/8b0ac4c6.jpg[/img=left]
    [img=right]http://i96.photobucket.com/albums/l163/62champ/car/th7E7-11-20021.jpg[/img=right]

    Comment


    • #3
      The article below is even more interesting.

      Take out 'dime store novel' and put in 'violent video games,' 'gansta rap' or other list of modern ills people point to in society today and it could have been written last week.

      That is, except for the kid being accused of stealing $2.25...

      <div align="left">1960 Lark VI</div id="left"> <div align="right">1962 7E7-122</div id="right">
      [img=left]http://i96.photobucket.com/albums/l163/62champ/car/8b0ac4c6.jpg[/img=left]
      [img=right]http://i96.photobucket.com/albums/l163/62champ/car/th7E7-11-20021.jpg[/img=right]

      Comment


      • #4
        80 hours of continuous driving to cover 785 miles. I wonder how an average of 9.8 MPH was for the roads of those days...what kind of mileage they got...and it must have been, er, challenging to relieve one's elf on those bumpy roads.

        On a serious note, I realize that most of you who check out the PDF of that article are also going to read the story that follows it. While I think it's very interesting, worth reading and is more relevant for today than one might think, I respectfully ask that we DO NOT get into a discussion on that particular off-topic article.

        Back to the original article... I've been Googling it but have yet to find anything on a "war message" around March 1908.

        BShaw,Webmaster

        60 Hawk. 49 2R5, 39 Champion
        Woodbury, Minnesota
        sigpic
        Bob Shaw
        Rush City, Minnesota
        1960 Hawk - www.northstarstudebakers.com
        "The farther I go, the behinder I get."

        Comment


        • #5
          80 hours of continuous driving to cover 785 miles. I wonder how an average of 9.8 MPH was for the roads of those days...what kind of mileage they got...and it must have been, er, challenging to relieve one's elf on those bumpy roads.

          On a serious note, I realize that most of you who check out the PDF of that article are also going to read the story that follows it. While I think it's very interesting, worth reading and is more relevant for today than one might think, I respectfully ask that we DO NOT get into a discussion on that particular off-topic article.

          Back to the original article... I've been Googling it but have yet to find anything on a "war message" around March 1908.

          BShaw,Webmaster

          60 Hawk. 49 2R5, 39 Champion
          Woodbury, Minnesota
          sigpic
          Bob Shaw
          Rush City, Minnesota
          1960 Hawk - www.northstarstudebakers.com
          "The farther I go, the behinder I get."

          Comment


          • #6
            Theodore Roosevelt was president in 1908. Would he be the "New York American"?

            Ft Leavenworth was the Army Staff College in 1908. George C Marshall graduated there in 1908. Douglas MacArthur as 1st Lieutenant was aide to President Theodore Roosevelt, 1906-1908; was troop commander, adjutant, and Army Service Schools instructor at Fort Leavenworth, 1908-1912.

            While searching Google, it provided three "News archive results for 'february 1908 roosevelt ft leavenworth' " including:
            The Daily Review (Newspaper) - February 26, 1908, Decatur, Illinois
            Subscription - Daily Review, The - NewspaperArchive - Feb 26, 1908
            "Presi- dent Roosevelt sent to congress today a special message ON The ... this city yesterday af- ternoon left early today ON its way to Fort'Leavenworth. ... " - and I seem to need a subscription to the Newspaper Archive to view the remainder of the article.


            Nothing but more intrigue

            --george


            Comment


            • #7
              Theodore Roosevelt was president in 1908. Would he be the "New York American"?

              Ft Leavenworth was the Army Staff College in 1908. George C Marshall graduated there in 1908. Douglas MacArthur as 1st Lieutenant was aide to President Theodore Roosevelt, 1906-1908; was troop commander, adjutant, and Army Service Schools instructor at Fort Leavenworth, 1908-1912.

              While searching Google, it provided three "News archive results for 'february 1908 roosevelt ft leavenworth' " including:
              The Daily Review (Newspaper) - February 26, 1908, Decatur, Illinois
              Subscription - Daily Review, The - NewspaperArchive - Feb 26, 1908
              "Presi- dent Roosevelt sent to congress today a special message ON The ... this city yesterday af- ternoon left early today ON its way to Fort'Leavenworth. ... " - and I seem to need a subscription to the Newspaper Archive to view the remainder of the article.


              Nothing but more intrigue

              --george


              Comment


              • #8
                more possibilities....the same news archive showed this:

                bedford_gazette 1908-07-17
                Subscription - Bedford Gazette - NewspaperArchive - Jul 17, 1908
                in his special message to Congress last winter, President Roosevelt de- clared ... Fred D. Grant From new York to Fort Leavenworth, Kan., last February, ...

                the newspaper archive does require a pricey subscription - at least $20 for a peek, and $96 per year.

                --george

                Comment


                • #9
                  more possibilities....the same news archive showed this:

                  bedford_gazette 1908-07-17
                  Subscription - Bedford Gazette - NewspaperArchive - Jul 17, 1908
                  in his special message to Congress last winter, President Roosevelt de- clared ... Fred D. Grant From new York to Fort Leavenworth, Kan., last February, ...

                  the newspaper archive does require a pricey subscription - at least $20 for a peek, and $96 per year.

                  --george

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    BShaw
                    The New York American was a newspaper. The United States was involved in a campaign to suppress Muslim guerrillas in the American colony of the Philippines in 1908 (the more things change, the more that they remain the same) but that was considered an "insurrection", not really a war. There were also low-level wars between Italy, Austria-Hungary, the Ottoman Empire and Serbia in the balkans during that period. I suspect, however, that "the war message" was hypothetical and that this was some sort of demonstration intended to show that horseless carriages could carry secret messages faster than horses or trains.
                    John
                    1950 Champion
                    W-3 4 Dr. Sedan
                    Holdrege NE

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      BShaw
                      The New York American was a newspaper. The United States was involved in a campaign to suppress Muslim guerrillas in the American colony of the Philippines in 1908 (the more things change, the more that they remain the same) but that was considered an "insurrection", not really a war. There were also low-level wars between Italy, Austria-Hungary, the Ottoman Empire and Serbia in the balkans during that period. I suspect, however, that "the war message" was hypothetical and that this was some sort of demonstration intended to show that horseless carriages could carry secret messages faster than horses or trains.
                      John
                      1950 Champion
                      W-3 4 Dr. Sedan
                      Holdrege NE

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        About a month ago I bought six (6) 8 X 10 photos of the Army Dipatch car in question. The pictures were in one long wood frame under glass. From the look of the frames back and the smell of the pictures I believe they were in that frame for a long time.
                        The Studebaker was sent on a mission by Major Gen. Fredrick Dent Grant (the son of U. S. Grant). The car was to deliver a message to Col. Loughbrought at Fort Leavenworth, KS. There is an article about the car and mission in the July/August 1990 issue of The Antique Studebaker Review written by the grandson of one of the drivers. The car was driven by several drivers during the trip.
                        I will try to post some of the pictures later tonight and over the next few days.


                        Gary Sanders
                        Nixa, MO
                        President Toy Studebaker Collectors Club. Have an interest in Toy Studebakers? Contact me for details.
                        Gary Sanders
                        Nixa, MO

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          About a month ago I bought six (6) 8 X 10 photos of the Army Dipatch car in question. The pictures were in one long wood frame under glass. From the look of the frames back and the smell of the pictures I believe they were in that frame for a long time.
                          The Studebaker was sent on a mission by Major Gen. Fredrick Dent Grant (the son of U. S. Grant). The car was to deliver a message to Col. Loughbrought at Fort Leavenworth, KS. There is an article about the car and mission in the July/August 1990 issue of The Antique Studebaker Review written by the grandson of one of the drivers. The car was driven by several drivers during the trip.
                          I will try to post some of the pictures later tonight and over the next few days.


                          Gary Sanders
                          Nixa, MO
                          President Toy Studebaker Collectors Club. Have an interest in Toy Studebakers? Contact me for details.
                          Gary Sanders
                          Nixa, MO

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            quote:Originally posted by BShaw
                            On a serious note, I realize that most of you who check out the PDF of that article are also going to read the story that follows it. While I think it's very interesting, worth reading and is more relevant for today than one might think, I respectfully ask that we DO NOT get into a discussion on that particular off-topic article.

                            BShaw,Webmaster

                            60 Hawk. 49 2R5, 39 Champion
                            Woodbury, Minnesota
                            I did not mean to try and get things off topic or try to get any arguments started here - not any help needed with that. I just thought it was interesting and I always tell my student that history is not just about dates and famous people on money - it is about people who had problems and hand-ups like we do today.

                            Try not to do it again.

                            <div align="left">1960 Lark VI</div id="left"> <div align="right">1962 7E7-122</div id="right">
                            [img=left]http://i96.photobucket.com/albums/l163/62champ/car/8b0ac4c6.jpg[/img=left]
                            [img=right]http://i96.photobucket.com/albums/l163/62champ/car/th7E7-11-20021.jpg[/img=right]

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              quote:Originally posted by BShaw
                              On a serious note, I realize that most of you who check out the PDF of that article are also going to read the story that follows it. While I think it's very interesting, worth reading and is more relevant for today than one might think, I respectfully ask that we DO NOT get into a discussion on that particular off-topic article.

                              BShaw,Webmaster

                              60 Hawk. 49 2R5, 39 Champion
                              Woodbury, Minnesota
                              I did not mean to try and get things off topic or try to get any arguments started here - not any help needed with that. I just thought it was interesting and I always tell my student that history is not just about dates and famous people on money - it is about people who had problems and hand-ups like we do today.

                              Try not to do it again.

                              <div align="left">1960 Lark VI</div id="left"> <div align="right">1962 7E7-122</div id="right">
                              [img=left]http://i96.photobucket.com/albums/l163/62champ/car/8b0ac4c6.jpg[/img=left]
                              [img=right]http://i96.photobucket.com/albums/l163/62champ/car/th7E7-11-20021.jpg[/img=right]

                              Comment

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