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  • Guido
    replied
    quote:Originally posted by gordr
    That M-16 would be a good candidate for a Rustoleum paintjob like Guido did on his fire truck.
    The key is a thin nap or foam roller.


    Leave a comment:


  • Guido
    replied
    quote:Originally posted by gordr
    That M-16 would be a good candidate for a Rustoleum paintjob like Guido did on his fire truck.
    The key is a thin nap or foam roller.


    Leave a comment:


  • gordr
    replied
    Uh-oh, Winter is coming, there is a distinct chill in the air today. Thermometer struggled to get over the freezing point. Still no wind, and tolerable working in the sunshine. We have had a real fine November so far, so that knocks a big chunk off the length of Winter, hopefully.

    I didn't work on the M-16 today, although I did start it up and move it to allow my tractor access to an engine I had to lift. I spent some time bead-blasting a '40 Champion brake drum for a Forum member in Minnesota. It cleaned up pretty well.

    Then I was faced with a 259 sitting in the back of the little Toyota pickup, and an engine stand with a 259 block on it, with pistons seized in all 8 bores. I decided to sacrifice the pistons, as chances are they would be unsalvageable anyway. Knocked them all out with a 2 lb hammer and a length of steel rod. Broke every piston, but got them all out. Most of the rods can be salvaged, I think. Also got the camshaft out in one piece. Should ship that to Phil Harris and get an R-2+ cam made.

    Got the stripped block off the engine stand, and set it aside. Maybe one day I'll send it in to a machine shop for hot tanking and see if it can be salvaged. Might be a good candidate for a big overbore; it's a '58 block.

    Got the bellhousing and clutch off the engine on the truck bed, and removed the distributor and throttle linkage, too. I had this one "almost" running, but it couldn't quite keep going. It did fire on most cylinders while cranking on the starter. Did develop oil pressure, though. I plan to give this one a quicky freshening-up, and spend as little money as possible. I'll keep a record of what goes into it. It's a '63 or '64 259 which had a T86 overdrive on it. Bought the whole thing for a hundred bucks.

    When I removed the pressure plate, the clutch disc came off in two pieces: the thin spring steel matrix that the friction rings were riveted to had rusted right away. Too bad, there was plenty of "meat" on the friction rings, too. I have a photo of this, under the name RustNeverSleeps.

    I used the loader on my International tractor to hoist this engine off the truck bed and hang it while I attached the engine stand. Then I set it down on the shop apron, and pushed it indoors. So, as of now, I don't have anything outside that will really suffer badly when the snow comes.

    Pictures at: <http://s210.photobucket.com/albums/b...dintrochu/>

    There is also a picture of the carcass of the Weasel I parted out, looking like some strange fossil arthropod from the Burgess Shale. And a couple of pics of the M-16 happily idling away, with its one headlight glimming away, as well as one clearance light. The close-up pic of the engine has an interesting effect; you can see a ghostly image of one of the fan blades in front of the belt, just where it comes off the water pump pulley. The engine was running when I took the shot.

    That M-16 would be a good candidate for a Rustoleum paintjob like Guido did on his fire truck.

    Gord Richmond, within Weasel range of the Alberta Badlands

    Leave a comment:


  • gordr
    replied
    Uh-oh, Winter is coming, there is a distinct chill in the air today. Thermometer struggled to get over the freezing point. Still no wind, and tolerable working in the sunshine. We have had a real fine November so far, so that knocks a big chunk off the length of Winter, hopefully.

    I didn't work on the M-16 today, although I did start it up and move it to allow my tractor access to an engine I had to lift. I spent some time bead-blasting a '40 Champion brake drum for a Forum member in Minnesota. It cleaned up pretty well.

    Then I was faced with a 259 sitting in the back of the little Toyota pickup, and an engine stand with a 259 block on it, with pistons seized in all 8 bores. I decided to sacrifice the pistons, as chances are they would be unsalvageable anyway. Knocked them all out with a 2 lb hammer and a length of steel rod. Broke every piston, but got them all out. Most of the rods can be salvaged, I think. Also got the camshaft out in one piece. Should ship that to Phil Harris and get an R-2+ cam made.

    Got the stripped block off the engine stand, and set it aside. Maybe one day I'll send it in to a machine shop for hot tanking and see if it can be salvaged. Might be a good candidate for a big overbore; it's a '58 block.

    Got the bellhousing and clutch off the engine on the truck bed, and removed the distributor and throttle linkage, too. I had this one "almost" running, but it couldn't quite keep going. It did fire on most cylinders while cranking on the starter. Did develop oil pressure, though. I plan to give this one a quicky freshening-up, and spend as little money as possible. I'll keep a record of what goes into it. It's a '63 or '64 259 which had a T86 overdrive on it. Bought the whole thing for a hundred bucks.

    When I removed the pressure plate, the clutch disc came off in two pieces: the thin spring steel matrix that the friction rings were riveted to had rusted right away. Too bad, there was plenty of "meat" on the friction rings, too. I have a photo of this, under the name RustNeverSleeps.

    I used the loader on my International tractor to hoist this engine off the truck bed and hang it while I attached the engine stand. Then I set it down on the shop apron, and pushed it indoors. So, as of now, I don't have anything outside that will really suffer badly when the snow comes.

    Pictures at: <http://s210.photobucket.com/albums/b...dintrochu/>

    There is also a picture of the carcass of the Weasel I parted out, looking like some strange fossil arthropod from the Burgess Shale. And a couple of pics of the M-16 happily idling away, with its one headlight glimming away, as well as one clearance light. The close-up pic of the engine has an interesting effect; you can see a ghostly image of one of the fan blades in front of the belt, just where it comes off the water pump pulley. The engine was running when I took the shot.

    That M-16 would be a good candidate for a Rustoleum paintjob like Guido did on his fire truck.

    Gord Richmond, within Weasel range of the Alberta Badlands

    Leave a comment:


  • mbstude
    replied
    If you REALLY want to get the ladies while driving a C cab, paint it Orange. [)]

    Matthew Burnette
    '59 Scotsman
    '63 Daytona
    Hazlehurst, GA




    Leave a comment:


  • mbstude
    replied
    If you REALLY want to get the ladies while driving a C cab, paint it Orange. [)]

    Matthew Burnette
    '59 Scotsman
    '63 Daytona
    Hazlehurst, GA




    Leave a comment:


  • Roscomacaw
    replied
    Also - regarding Pete's seeming "allure" for the ladies, I've written before that I get more comments from gals than guys about him (Pete[:I]) It's NOT just that I remember the gals more than the guys. If I can be afforded the liberty to speculate what is the draw, I have a notion it's a combination of things. The two-tone colorscheme allied with the "sexy" Darrin Dip to the beltline moulding as well as Pete's less aggresive appearance by virtue of his looking much smaller than contemporary pickup trucks.
    In fact, as the barber trimmed my hairs yesterday, the other barber commented, once again, how he loves seeing that Stude truck. Yes, these two are guys, but his observations probably ring true for gals as well. He said: " That ol' thing just LOOKS friendly! It looks like ya don't have to have a daggone ladder to get in it - just open the door and sit down. I like that!" [^]

    Miscreant adrift in
    the BerStuda Triangle


    1957 Transtar 1/2ton
    1960 Larkvertible V8
    1958 Provincial wagon
    1953 Commander coupe

    Leave a comment:


  • Roscomacaw
    replied
    Also - regarding Pete's seeming "allure" for the ladies, I've written before that I get more comments from gals than guys about him (Pete[:I]) It's NOT just that I remember the gals more than the guys. If I can be afforded the liberty to speculate what is the draw, I have a notion it's a combination of things. The two-tone colorscheme allied with the "sexy" Darrin Dip to the beltline moulding as well as Pete's less aggresive appearance by virtue of his looking much smaller than contemporary pickup trucks.
    In fact, as the barber trimmed my hairs yesterday, the other barber commented, once again, how he loves seeing that Stude truck. Yes, these two are guys, but his observations probably ring true for gals as well. He said: " That ol' thing just LOOKS friendly! It looks like ya don't have to have a daggone ladder to get in it - just open the door and sit down. I like that!" [^]

    Miscreant adrift in
    the BerStuda Triangle


    1957 Transtar 1/2ton
    1960 Larkvertible V8
    1958 Provincial wagon
    1953 Commander coupe

    Leave a comment:


  • Roscomacaw
    replied
    I looked up that number in the '62 Parts Price List and it says that for 525802, substitute 532915.

    Miscreant adrift in
    the BerStuda Triangle


    1957 Transtar 1/2ton
    1960 Larkvertible V8
    1958 Provincial wagon
    1953 Commander coupe

    Leave a comment:


  • Roscomacaw
    replied
    I looked up that number in the '62 Parts Price List and it says that for 525802, substitute 532915.

    Miscreant adrift in
    the BerStuda Triangle


    1957 Transtar 1/2ton
    1960 Larkvertible V8
    1958 Provincial wagon
    1953 Commander coupe

    Leave a comment:


  • Transtar60
    replied
    Gord that number is not in the 1957-61 truck parts book.
    Maybe its in the 2R or what ever parts books prior to 1957.
    BTW the parts number for the short block is 532915 for std 532916 HD in the 57-61 book.


    3E38
    4E2
    4E28
    5E13
    7E7
    8E7
    8E12
    8E28

    59 Lark
    etc

    Leave a comment:


  • Transtar60
    replied
    Gord that number is not in the 1957-61 truck parts book.
    Maybe its in the 2R or what ever parts books prior to 1957.
    BTW the parts number for the short block is 532915 for std 532916 HD in the 57-61 book.


    3E38
    4E2
    4E28
    5E13
    7E7
    8E7
    8E12
    8E28

    59 Lark
    etc

    Leave a comment:


  • gordr
    replied
    Well, we had even a nicer day today, maybe 45 degrees, sunny, and NO wind. Quite pleasant working in the sunshine.

    Since I had the side of the doghouse off, I figured there was no better opportunity to hang a cleaning on the left side of the engine, and to clean up and service the generator and distributor. I knew the generator was not charging, and the distributor, while obviously working, was filthy.

    I removed the generator, and set it aside, and discovered a tag on the block with a stern warning: "Do Not Remove This Tag". Shades of the mattress police. Evidently it's a replacement engine, and the part number on the tag is 525802. I'm guessing it's a 245, since by the time a '47 truck would need a new motor, the 245s would be in the system as replacements. Anybody know for sure?

    I removed the distributor, and made the happy discovery that the vacuum advance unit was still good. With the distributor and generator out of the way, it was an easy matter to scrape most of the built-up crud off the side of the block and adjacent parts of the frame.

    I washed the distributor in a solvent bath, and cleaned it right up. Turned out the mechanical advance was stuck, and the point gap was about .040 inch. A little penetrating oil plus movement freed up the advance weights, and I set the point gap to a tight 20 thou, which should be MUCH closer to the right setting. Reinstalled the distributor, and went to work on the generator.

    The generator got the solvent bath treatment, too, and all the crud scraped off. Brushes were hung up, so I freed them, and shined up the commutator with a strip of abrasive cloth. The noise suppressor condenser on the generator had a hole right through the case, so I found a good one in the barn. Reinstalled the generator, and fired up the engine. Ran quite a bit better, but no output from the generator, even if I flashed the field.

    I took the cover off the voltage regulator, and it was crusty mess of rust inside, with the shrunken cork gasket providing the reason why. Had another root through the barn, and found an identical regulator in apparently primo condition, in the box of assorted voltage regulators. That's pretty remarkable right there. (Not that I had it, but that it was where it was supposed to be.)

    With the new regulator installed, I started it up, and Bingo!, it was charging like it should, peaking at 35 amps, and dropping to to about 5 at a fast idle. The more this engine runs, the better it sounds, and there is no blue smoke. I did another orbit around the yard, before it got quite dark out. As I headed back to to where I planned to park, I switched on the lights, more to read the instruments than anything else, and the one headlight came on! Furthermore, it works on both high and low beam, and the high beam indicator works, too.

    No brakes, yet, and the fluid I put into the master cylinder yesterday had mysteriously vanished, without leaving a damp spot on the ground under the m/c. I put some more fluid in, and pumped for a while, without much in the way of results. No hydrovac on this truck.

    Seems like this old Stude really wants to rejoin the land of the living.

    Gord Richmond, within Weasel range of the Alberta Badlands

    Leave a comment:


  • gordr
    replied
    Well, we had even a nicer day today, maybe 45 degrees, sunny, and NO wind. Quite pleasant working in the sunshine.

    Since I had the side of the doghouse off, I figured there was no better opportunity to hang a cleaning on the left side of the engine, and to clean up and service the generator and distributor. I knew the generator was not charging, and the distributor, while obviously working, was filthy.

    I removed the generator, and set it aside, and discovered a tag on the block with a stern warning: "Do Not Remove This Tag". Shades of the mattress police. Evidently it's a replacement engine, and the part number on the tag is 525802. I'm guessing it's a 245, since by the time a '47 truck would need a new motor, the 245s would be in the system as replacements. Anybody know for sure?

    I removed the distributor, and made the happy discovery that the vacuum advance unit was still good. With the distributor and generator out of the way, it was an easy matter to scrape most of the built-up crud off the side of the block and adjacent parts of the frame.

    I washed the distributor in a solvent bath, and cleaned it right up. Turned out the mechanical advance was stuck, and the point gap was about .040 inch. A little penetrating oil plus movement freed up the advance weights, and I set the point gap to a tight 20 thou, which should be MUCH closer to the right setting. Reinstalled the distributor, and went to work on the generator.

    The generator got the solvent bath treatment, too, and all the crud scraped off. Brushes were hung up, so I freed them, and shined up the commutator with a strip of abrasive cloth. The noise suppressor condenser on the generator had a hole right through the case, so I found a good one in the barn. Reinstalled the generator, and fired up the engine. Ran quite a bit better, but no output from the generator, even if I flashed the field.

    I took the cover off the voltage regulator, and it was crusty mess of rust inside, with the shrunken cork gasket providing the reason why. Had another root through the barn, and found an identical regulator in apparently primo condition, in the box of assorted voltage regulators. That's pretty remarkable right there. (Not that I had it, but that it was where it was supposed to be.)

    With the new regulator installed, I started it up, and Bingo!, it was charging like it should, peaking at 35 amps, and dropping to to about 5 at a fast idle. The more this engine runs, the better it sounds, and there is no blue smoke. I did another orbit around the yard, before it got quite dark out. As I headed back to to where I planned to park, I switched on the lights, more to read the instruments than anything else, and the one headlight came on! Furthermore, it works on both high and low beam, and the high beam indicator works, too.

    No brakes, yet, and the fluid I put into the master cylinder yesterday had mysteriously vanished, without leaving a damp spot on the ground under the m/c. I put some more fluid in, and pumped for a while, without much in the way of results. No hydrovac on this truck.

    Seems like this old Stude really wants to rejoin the land of the living.

    Gord Richmond, within Weasel range of the Alberta Badlands

    Leave a comment:


  • raprice
    replied
    Mr. Biggs, it must be your animal magnatism that keeps the girls coming after you. You must have an understanding wife.
    But then again, maybe it's the truck.
    Rog


    '59 Lark VI Regal Hardtop

    Leave a comment:

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