Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Body work anyone?

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Body work anyone?

    I've been looking at recent developments in auto body repair and have been looking at the Eastwood site. They have a soda blasting system that is
    used to strip body panels that can minimize warping and heavy scores in the metal. I've seen 10 people who were inexperienced complete strip a
    1932 body and it was clean! Has anyone on the forum use this kind of soda blasting in their body work. I'm thinking of tackling the body work on my
    1951 and get the car looking better sooner than I expected. Thanks.

    Last edited by Glenn Morgan; 05-14-2015, 05:32 PM.

  • #2
    Glenn, you might want to investigate the locations and costs of on-site, portable soda blasting companies that will come to your home or business and blast your vehicle on location, if you aren't going to do several cars. Soda blasting is the way to go, as you've seen, and those guys can do the job in half the time you'd spend fiddling around with it...and you wouldn't have equipment sitting around that you might never use again. BP.
    We've got to quit saying, "How stupid can you be?" Too many people are taking it as a challenge.

    Ayn Rand:
    "You can avoid reality, but you cannot avoid the consequences of avoiding reality."

    G. K. Chesterton: This triangle of truisms, of father, mother, and child, cannot be destroyed; it can only destroy those civilizations which disregard it.

    Comment


    • #3
      Soda blasting also reguires a special cleaning process before any body work and priming can be done.
      Tom
      sigpic

      Comment


      • #4
        I soda blasted a portion of the 64 HT that I restored. It was the messiest, dustiest job ever. Even with a respirator, I think I inhaled a cup of fine particulates and coughed for weeks. So, I will never do it again. It is gentle on the sheet metal and you can even blast rubber without hurting it. But, because it's so gentle, I noticed that I couldn't blast out all the rust in the deeper pores. IMO, Bob P. has the best idea. Hire someone for that job.

        Comment


        • #5
          I would look at using glass beads as a blast before using soda. If you don't get all the soda cleaned off and treated anything you put over it will come off.

          Comment


          • #6
            I'm very interested in this. Enough that I'm thinking about buying one:

            http://www.dustlessblasting.com
            Proud NON-CASO

            I do not prize the word "cheap." It is not a badge of honor...it is a symbol of despair. ~ William McKinley

            If it is decreed that I should go down, then let me go down linked with the truth—let me die in the advocacy of what is just and right.- Lincoln

            GOD BLESS AMERICA

            Ephesians 6:10-17
            Romans 15:13
            Deuteronomy 31:6
            Proverbs 28:1

            Illegitimi non carborundum

            Comment


            • #7
              Bob I talked to my sand blaster about that and he said nothing new and he could do the same thing with his machine. Sounded like a lot of good PR work by the company. The video sure looks good though and I've seen it on MY classic car show.

              Comment


              • #8
                Dip the car in vinegar. All the baking soda in crevices would be found

                Comment


                • #9
                  I used Menard's Black Beauty to blast the paint and rust off my friend's 1929 Stutz doors, and it worked fine with no warpage. I used an 1/8" nozzle and 40 pounds of pressure.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Baking soda no way as it is too fine........ sand yes I sandblasted by 65 back in 1981 down to bare metal and then did the body work and put on seven coats of primer. The paint is still stuck on great and because I took it down back then...... when I re do it I will have half the work because my base coat is so good that I only need to take my car down in spots where I have new dents or the original body work cracked. I was stuck in Seattle traffic and I had to drive with a broken link of my tire chain flailing around inside the fenderwell.
                    If you car is ugly then it better be fast.....

                    65 2dr sedan
                    64 2dr sedan (Pinkie)
                    61 V8 Tcab
                    63 Tcab 20R powered
                    55 Commander Wagon
                    54 Champion Wagon
                    46 Gibson Model A
                    50 JD MC
                    45 Agricat
                    67 Triumph T100
                    66 Bultaco Matadore

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      I have had several cars and lots of separate body and frame parts blasted with plastic media in the last 25 years, and it has never caused me any problems. After the plastic media, they sometimes do some blasting with sand to get any heavy rust off. I have had some fairly light weight parts done with plastic media, and cannot recall ever having warpage.
                      Trying to build a 48 Studebaker for the 21st century.
                      See more of my projects at stilettoman.info

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        As I recall there never was any problem with good ol' sandblasting...if the guy had any idea of how to do it. Then came along 'dipping'. Strippers with big tanks dipped the whole body. There were a few problems such as neutralizing the caustic crap so that a year after painting the paint didn't start to lift in certain places. But the car magazines sorta stopped showing how cool it was to dip the body. Now how-to car mags are raving about soda blasting. It cures a nonexistent problem. We used it on a 54 Vette glass body but that is a different application..stick with properly applied sandblasting if you are certain you need to blast the body in the first place.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Originally posted by oldsalt View Post
                          As I recall there never was any problem with good ol' sandblasting...if the guy had any idea of how to do it. Then came along 'dipping'. Strippers with big tanks dipped the whole body. There were a few problems such as neutralizing the caustic crap so that a year after painting the paint didn't start to lift in certain places. But the car magazines sorta stopped showing how cool it was to dip the body. Now how-to car mags are raving about soda blasting. It cures a nonexistent problem. We used it on a 54 Vette glass body but that is a different application..stick with properly applied sandblasting if you are certain you need to blast the body in the first place.
                          Totally agree with oldsalt. We've had this discussion on several occasions and I asked the forum in an earlier post to tell me how many had warped metal panels using home sand blasting equipment and the answer was ZERO! The biggest issue with home blasting is the load it puts on the air compressor. You need a lot of volume continuously and only a quality 5 HP or higher compressor is worth using.

                          I have sand blasted at least 10 bodies over time and I'll bet the backyard at my old house was three inches higher that when I purchased it do to the sand. I've never had a problem with warping and I use a lot higher pressure than 40 PSI. Get a good hood and respirator as sand is not your lungs friend.

                          I've used the Black Diamond recently in my blasting cabinet and it cuts better than silica sand so I'm a fan.

                          Unless you want to pay someone to do it use sand or the equivalent and prime quickly with a good epoxy primer afterwards.

                          One last suggestion, Buy a carbide nozzle for the blaster, the standard one just wear out much to fast and reduce efficiency.

                          JMHO, Bob
                          , ,

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Blasting with sand or glass bead leaves the stuff in every nook and cranny, only to blow out into your new paint.Blasting with soda ash leaves an alkaline film which you must neutralize with vinegar or muriatic acid and a water rinse, inviting rust.

                            Blasting with plastic media is better, since it doesn't invite rust, but you must blow every bit of it out with compressed air, lest it get into your new paint.

                            Blasting with frozen CO2 (dry ice) is , IMHO, the best. Gentle, cleans well, evaporates instantly leaving no residue.

                            Most big cities will have someone who will bring his equipment to your site.



                            https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=l_9nITRz--0
                            Last edited by jnormanh; 05-16-2015, 04:29 PM.

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Well, back in my younger years trying out a new sandblaster I WAS able to warp panels! With a suction blaster and #2 grit. So it can be done. Now, that is just part of the learning curve, and then you do not do it anymore.

                              I use baking soda blasting on carburetors. Now that looks and works great!
                              Frank DuVal

                              50 Commander 4 door

                              Comment

                              Working...
                              X