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  • Save a Studebaker: New Sales Record Time

    This has to be a new record for a fast Studebaker sale.

    This dead 1956 Champion sedan was dropped off to be parted and scrapped at my friend's transmission shop where I sell cars and trucks I have for sale.

    He called me to find out what it was, looking at the RF fender and insisting it was a "Champ" over the phone. That sounded confusing when he said it was a 4-door and not a truck, so I went to look at it. You can see how he got the "Champ" idea...

    He agreed that if he could get $450 for it, he wouldn't take the mechanicals out of it and junk the rest, as was planned:









    I took pictures of it and e-mailed them with a general description of the car to several dozen local Indy Chapter SDC members at about 11:00 AM Tuesday morning, March 31. By 1:40 PM that afternoon, one of our members had shown up, bought and paid for it, and arranged transportation from the shop to his house! Dedicated soul that our member is, he said, "Bob, we just can't let this go to the crusher!" I think he has Studebaker V8 plans for it for a fun car for a younger person in the family.

    It was "loaded." I mean: Two-tone paint, wheel covers, whitewalls, overdrive, dual exterior rear-view mirrors, oil bath air cleaner, Climatizer, and oil filter. (Any time you get a Champion with more than three options, I figure it's loaded! )

    Now that's a speedy sale!

    (Yes, I think the intact OEM battery hold-down clinched the deal. ) BP
    Last edited by BobPalma; 04-01-2015, 01:05 PM. Reason: spelling
    We've got to quit saying, "How stupid can you be?" Too many people are taking it as a challenge.

    Ayn Rand:
    "You can avoid reality, but you cannot avoid the consequences of avoiding reality."

    G. K. Chesterton: This triangle of truisms, of father, mother, and child, cannot be destroyed; it can only destroy those civilizations which disregard it.

  • #2
    If, what looks like a pretty complete body, (with paint nearly covering most of it) is not covering up a disintegrating frame...this could be a fun project, with the stock six, and especially a V8! By the way, since it is a '58, is that six a 185?
    John Clary
    Greer, SC

    SDC member since 1975

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    • #3
      Originally posted by jclary View Post
      If, what looks like a pretty complete body, (with paint nearly covering most of it) is not covering up a disintegrating frame...this could be a fun project, with the stock six, and especially a V8! By the way, since it is a '58, is that six a 185?
      Yes, John; it is a 185 Victory Six. (I'm sure you mistyped 1958 instead of 1956 as to the model year...but it sure made me check to be sure I hadn't done that!) BP
      We've got to quit saying, "How stupid can you be?" Too many people are taking it as a challenge.

      Ayn Rand:
      "You can avoid reality, but you cannot avoid the consequences of avoiding reality."

      G. K. Chesterton: This triangle of truisms, of father, mother, and child, cannot be destroyed; it can only destroy those civilizations which disregard it.

      Comment


      • #4
        If all those stickers, and traces of older stickers on the A-pillar are anything to go by, I bet it was rather well maintained at one time, and might not take much effort to get running.

        Craig

        Comment


        • #5
          Cool! Glad it was saved! Snatched another Studebaker from the crusher's jaws. Sure didn't want to read it was on its way to China to come back as a washing machine.
          sigpic1957 Packard Clipper Country Sedan

          "There's nothing stronger than the heart of a volunteer"
          Lt. Col. Jimmy Doolittle
          "I have a great memory for forgetting things" Number 1 son, Lee Chan

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          • #6
            Great! A bit of work and it could be a nice driver.
            Mono mind in a stereo world

            Comment


            • #7
              Originally posted by 8E45E View Post
              If all those stickers, and traces of older stickers on the A-pillar are anything to go by, I bet it was rather well maintained at one time, and might not take much effort to get running. Craig
              Right, Craig. I didn't pull it through to see if the engine was free, but I'll bet it was. The oil was clean and only 1/2 quart low...and the dipstick was bright and shiny, too; not all rusty from condensation or being immersed in contaminated oil.

              The real mechanical issue, and possibly why somebody quit fiddling with it years ago, was that the carburetor was dismantled and on the front seat. Thoughtfully, a thick rag had been placed over the intake manifold's carburetor mounting pad, so nothing had crawled in the open hole, or it least it didn't look that way.

              The clutch felt good but the brake pedal was on the floor when depressed, even though the pedal returned when released due to the return spring being in good shape.

              'Still had its official "factory dual exhaust" stub pipe on the left side, too. I always thought they were cute on single-exhaust 1956 sedans. BP
              We've got to quit saying, "How stupid can you be?" Too many people are taking it as a challenge.

              Ayn Rand:
              "You can avoid reality, but you cannot avoid the consequences of avoiding reality."

              G. K. Chesterton: This triangle of truisms, of father, mother, and child, cannot be destroyed; it can only destroy those civilizations which disregard it.

              Comment


              • #8
                Around 1970 I saw a 4-door Commander in those same colors. It had damage to the right front, but nothing more than a good fender-bender. I parted it out, mainly for the 259 and Flight-O for my 2R truck. That Commander had the full vinyl interior, and power front windows. Looking back now, that car certainly should have been saved.

                Comment


                • #9
                  Originally posted by BobPalma View Post
                  (I'm sure you mistyped 1958 instead of 1956 as to the model year...but it sure made me check to be sure I hadn't done that!) BP
                  ...someday...gotta find where I laid those glasses.
                  John Clary
                  Greer, SC

                  SDC member since 1975

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    I've owned and driven cars that looked worse than this. I like it. Someone got a good deal for sure!

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Wow! Looks like minimal rust for an Indiana car. Should be a great little project.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Good on you guys!

                        I always thought I could like a well-equipped, '56 Commander (OK, same trim as a Champion I think), V8 2-door sedan. I like the two-tone treatment way better than on the Presidents. I also like the 'flare' taillight design a little better than the '57.
                        Bill Pressler
                        Kent, OH
                        (formerly Greenville, PA)
                        Currently owned: 1966 Cruiser, Timberline Turquoise, 26K miles
                        Formerly owned: 1963 Lark Daytona Skytop R1, Ermine White
                        1964 Daytona Hardtop, Strato Blue
                        1966 Daytona Sports Sedan, Niagara Blue Mist
                        All are in Australia now

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                        • #13
                          I think he has Studebaker V8 plans for it for a fun car for a younger person in the family.


                          Originally posted by BobPalma View Post
                          I didn't pull it through to see if the engine was free, but I'll bet it was. The oil was clean and only 1/2 quart low...and the dipstick was bright and shiny, too; not all rusty from condensation or being immersed in contaminated oil.

                          The real mechanical issue, and possibly why somebody quit fiddling with it years ago, was that the carburetor was dismantled and on the front seat. Thoughtfully, a thick rag had been placed over the intake manifold's carburetor mounting pad, so nothing had crawled in the open hole, or it least it didn't look that way.

                          The clutch felt good but the brake pedal was on the floor when depressed, even though the pedal returned when released due to the return spring being in good shape.

                          If that is the case, and he replaces the carb with a good one, and the 185 proves to be a strong runner, I hope he will rethink about fitting a V8 for now. I suspect it will be a rather inexpensive project to make it presentable and roadworthy.

                          Craig

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Originally posted by 8E45E View Post
                            If that is the case, and he replaces the carb with a good one, and the 185 proves to be a strong runner, I hope he will rethink about fitting a V8 for now. I suspect it will be a rather inexpensive project to make it presentable and roadworthy. Craig
                            Right, Craig. Subsequent conversation this morning indicates he first wants to get the 185 running, if it will, and see how it does. I know he's going to do that; he said so!

                            "Inventorying," now that the car is at his house, is first priority.

                            Happily, when he got it home and looked it over more carefully, he was more pleased with the purchase, all things considered. BP
                            We've got to quit saying, "How stupid can you be?" Too many people are taking it as a challenge.

                            Ayn Rand:
                            "You can avoid reality, but you cannot avoid the consequences of avoiding reality."

                            G. K. Chesterton: This triangle of truisms, of father, mother, and child, cannot be destroyed; it can only destroy those civilizations which disregard it.

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Someone really needs to save this rare 52 hardtop. Were hard tops called Starliners in 52?

                              http://minneapolis.craigslist.org/hn...953476814.html

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