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Stude Dlrs in Cute Jan 62 Indpls Auto Trades Pub.

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  • Stude Dlrs in Cute Jan 62 Indpls Auto Trades Pub.

    'Went to The March Super Sunday Swap Meet at The Indiana State Fairgrounds today. 'Didn't expect to see anything particularly Studebaker, but you never know.

    Indeed, a vendor with a general assortment of "stuff" had 6 or 8 copies of a period Indianapolis Auto Trades publication called Automotive Contact:



    It's just a cheesy little 5 1/2" X 8" trade publication with color on the cover...and an attention-getting theme, as you can see, to attract the attention of auto trades people when it arrived at the various dealerships, auto service centers, machine shops, parts stores, gas stations, etc. The front cover photo information appearing on Page 8 says,

    "On this month's front cover we have the same picture that appeared on the April, 1956 cover. Miss Irene Twinam of Miami is still trying to entice some unsuspecting young fellow into playing beach ball with her. She is all dressed up for a rough game and we'll bet she is, as you can readily see. Line forms on the right, fellows...."(Photo by City of Miami Publicity Bureau.)"

    Now before the Politically-Correct Sensitivity Police have me arrested, I'll confirm that is exactly what it says; NO editing. Granted, the sentence beginning 'She is all dressed up..." doesn't make a lot of sense, but I was a sophomore at Paris High School [Paris IL] at the time and had nothing to do with the publication. (I moved to Indianapolis with my parents 6 months later, in June, 1962, at age 16.) Believe it or not -hold on, now; this is a shocker- people weren't so chronically uptight back then, always scanning the horizon for opportunities to be offended...and it doesn't look like Miss Twinam is being held or photographed against her will, either. (Shocking, I know. I'd better take the vapors before continuing.)

    Pause.

    There, that's better; goodness, how sexist!


    Anyway, Two Studebaker Dealership Parts Department advertisements appeared in this issue. You will recognize these names, and maybe even the addresses:



    You will recognize that 923 N. Meridian Street address from the following ad I've posted previously, after Charlie Stuart gave the franchise back to Studebaker and Studebaker wholesaled to a group of guys who milked it dry until Studebaker folded. Note that the telephone number had not changed, even though the dealership changed hands twice between these two advertisements!




    From this next advertisement in the January 1962 Indianapolis Automotive Contact, I can report that it was my privilege to get to know Snider Parts Manager Jim Hadley later in 1962 and on through 1966, when Snider closed at the end of Studebaker production. Jim was a real nice guy; knowledgeable and incredibly helpful to this obnoxious teen-ager who persisted in hanging around Snider Auto Service and pestering people about all things Studebaker. (I've been told my Studebaker interest and enthusiasm both amused and entertained the staff...and in retrospect, I suppose that might have been true. )



    You can barely read Snider on the building in this familiar photo of Cousin George Krem taking delivery of The Plain Brown Wrapper from Salesman (and our mutual uncle) Jerry Palma in early August 1964:



    ...and the deck lid / rear panel dealer logo that was never [thankfully] never affixed to The Plain Brown Wrapper:



    It's been awhile since I posted this nice period photo of my good friend, Snider Auto Service Sales Manager John Knapp, so here he is in his office at the dealership for those of you who may not have seen it:



    For a whole dollar bill(!), I'd say I got my money's worth for having today scored that January 1962 edition of Indianapolis Automotive Contact. Fond memories of nice people, nice places, and happy times. BP
    Last edited by BobPalma; 03-29-2015, 06:10 PM.
    We've got to quit saying, "How stupid can you be?" Too many people are taking it as a challenge.

    Ayn Rand:
    "You can avoid reality, but you cannot avoid the consequences of avoiding reality."

    G. K. Chesterton: This triangle of truisms, of father, mother, and child, cannot be destroyed; it can only destroy those civilizations which disregard it.

  • #2
    Here I thought you found some more vintage racing photos like you did a couple of years ago!! http://forum.studebakerdriversclub.c...t=1961+pontiac

    Craig

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    • #3
      John looks like a nice guy to deal with. I'd bring in my Studebaker for service there anytime!
      Thank you for posting.
      sigpic1957 Packard Clipper Country Sedan

      "There's nothing stronger than the heart of a volunteer"
      Lt. Col. Jimmy Doolittle
      "I have a great memory for forgetting things" Number 1 son, Lee Chan

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      • #4
        take the vapors... yer killing me with this stuff!
        61 lark cruiser
        64 daytona 2dr hardtop

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        • #5
          My dad bought his first Studebaker from Charlie Stuart in Indianapolis in late 1950. It was a 1951 Champion Starlight Coupe. In a crazy twist of fate, he took it in for it's first oil change and Charlie made him a deal to trade even for the car he had ordered for his wife. She did not want it so Charlie just wanted it off the lot. It was a 1951 fully loaded Land Cruiser with V8, A/T and leopard skin seats. My dad could not believe his good fortune at being at the dealership at the right moment. He also could not believe he got a top of the line car for the price of a Champion.
          Ed Sallia
          Dundee, OR

          Sol Lucet Omnibus

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          • #6
            That's a pretty cool story, Ed. Thanks. Small World Dept. BP
            We've got to quit saying, "How stupid can you be?" Too many people are taking it as a challenge.

            Ayn Rand:
            "You can avoid reality, but you cannot avoid the consequences of avoiding reality."

            G. K. Chesterton: This triangle of truisms, of father, mother, and child, cannot be destroyed; it can only destroy those civilizations which disregard it.

            Comment

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