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Wow! Land Cruiser for the price of a Champion

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  • Wow! Land Cruiser for the price of a Champion

    ...or so it would appear:

    http://www.hemmings.com/classifieds/...tml?refer=news

    BP
    We've got to quit saying, "How stupid can you be?" Too many people are taking it as a challenge.

    Ayn Rand:
    "You can avoid reality, but you cannot avoid the consequences of avoiding reality."

    G. K. Chesterton: This triangle of truisms, of father, mother, and child, cannot be destroyed; it can only destroy those civilizations which disregard it.

  • #2
    I guess Land Cruiser is spelled "C-h-a-m-p-i-o-n" in their neck of the woods.
    Ed Sallia
    Dundee, OR

    Sol Lucet Omnibus

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    • #3
      I believe that these series of cars, from 1947 to 1952 were likely some of Studebaker's finest. Although, nothing youngsters dreamed about, adults, with an eye for value, elegance, and dependability, recognized them as a way to drive and view the world in comfort while looking out from the inside. A true fan of vintage autos, not caught up in the glitz of coupes, convertibles, and sporty cosmetics (or picking up cheap trophies)...will recognize this class of car as overlooked, under priced, and unsurpassed as a bargain, if you'd like a "driver" for attending events.

      If you park this series of car next to any other family sedan of the era...in comparison...it is equal to, or superior to much of the competition. For years, I had foolishly dismissed the four door sedans as annoyances to have to walk around if they were in my path to the flashier, popular cars. That changed in 1987, while visiting a friend. He had a huge agriculture structure often seen on rural farms. A large metal roof, no sides, for storing combines, tractors, etc. At the time, I owned a truck and a Hawk. I don't think I had ever paid attention to the classifications as to Champions, Commanders, or Land Cruisers. There, parked among over twenty five unrestored Hawks, Coupes, trucks, etc., was a 1951 Land Cruiser. It was so dirty, you couldn't see the Maui Blue color, or even peer through the windows. I reached and open the front and back doors at the same time. I was shocked at how elegant the car was on the inside. It reminded me of entering an old abandoned southern plantation mansion. Although there were cobwebs hanging, you could tell, this was no average grocery getter. The sofa-like pillowed upholstery, the fold down armrest, lap robe accommodation, snap away assist straps, foot rest, even a "draw-a-matic" lighter. The large chrome framed gauges, automatic shifter, factory turn signals, and deluxe steering wheel, caught my eye as if it was the first revelation Studebaker ever offered such.

      In truth, it was a revelation to me. I had been so caught up in growing up, focused on getting on with my life after Vietnam, college, marriage, job, etc., that my car/Studebaker interest was very narrowly focused. During my guffawing admiration of the car, I turned to the owner and told him that I knew I couldn't afford paying him a fair price for the car. But, I told him that if he decided to sell it, would he please give me an opportunity to "turn it down?" I didn't realize it at the time, but that must have made an impression on him. A few weeks later, he died suddenly. His son called me and informed me that his dad had told him that, if anything happened, he would like for me to have the car.

      I have typed all this in response to Bob's post, because if there is anyone reading this...I'd like to impress how important a "second look" can be for us car folks. At the age I am now, I'm not sure I'd do it today, but sometime in 1988, I changed the oil in that old Land Cruiser, installed new points, battery, aired the tires, poured in some gas, cleaned the windows, and drove it about a hundred miles home. It is one of the "funnest" vehicles I have ever had.
      John Clary
      Greer, SC

      SDC member since 1975

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      • #4
        Saw that this morning, and thought it was a great price!
        The only difference between death and taxes is that death does not grow worse every time Congress convenes. - Will Rogers

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        • #5
          John, I loved your sentiment on the 4 door cars. I believe that kindness has been bestowed on many a 4 door car in recent years. As the age of the car enthusiast grows, and the desire to attend shows with like minded folk and family, many have turned to the "lowly" 4 door to enhance the ride, accessibility and sensibility of a best of both worlds thinking.
          sals54

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          • #6
            I'd agree, the Land Cruisers were Stude's finest post-war 4-dr sedans. Even though, I'm not a fan of the flathead 6-cyl engines, the '50 Land Cruiser stands alone for the style, grace and space. It's still a mystery why that was a one-year only.

            Saw that this morning, and thought it was a great price!
            It couldn't be restored to that condition for $22K, but is that the current market?

            jack vines
            Last edited by PackardV8; 03-17-2015, 11:09 AM.
            PackardV8

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            • #7
              That IS the Car they shoulda, coulda used to film Driving Miss Daisy! What a sweet Cruising Machine.

              That is a serious insult to call that Luxury Cruiser a "Champion"!
              StudeRich
              Second Generation Stude Driver,
              Proud '54 Starliner Owner

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              • #8
                My wife says she feels like she is riding in the lap of luxury whenever we go out in the '50 Commander 4-door Sedan. That 120" wheelbase, extravagant leg room and quiet ride make one feel like they are riding in a much more expensive automobile. Studebaker knew how to build a great car, they just needed to upsell it rather than market them as being in the "Lower Priced Field".
                Ed Sallia
                Dundee, OR

                Sol Lucet Omnibus

                Comment


                • #9
                  Originally posted by Commander Eddie View Post
                  My wife says she feels like she is riding in the lap of luxury whenever we go out in the '50 Commander 4-door Sedan. That 120" wheelbase, extravagant leg room and quiet ride make one feel like they are riding in a much more expensive automobile. Studebaker knew how to build a great car, they just needed to upsell it rather than market them as being in the "Lower Priced Field".
                  Your car ws not priced in the "Lower Priced Field". A 1950 Commander Regal sedan had a base price of $2024 ($2187 for a Land Cruiser and $1419 for a Champion Custom coupe). 1950 Chevrolets had a base price range of $1329 to $1994. 1950 Oldsmobiles had a base price range of $1719 to $2772 (probably a 98 convertible).
                  Gary L.
                  Wappinger, NY

                  SDC member since 1968
                  Studebaker enthusiast much longer

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    I couldn't agree more John, this was and really is a fun car. In the late fifties my older brother bought a 49 Land Cruiser for a couple of hundred bucks and drove it for many years. Come to think of it, just like the on fore sale,same color and interior. When we would drive from Mpls. to the North Shore on old highway 61 we have a blast. I was in my early teens an can still recall sleeping in the back seat stretched out with room for a pillow. This went on to influence me to buy my first Studeaker a 53 Starliner. Good rides, old digger.

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                    • #11
                      Originally posted by Commander Eddie View Post
                      My wife says she feels like she is riding in the lap of luxury whenever we go out in the '50 Commander 4-door Sedan. That 120" wheelbase, extravagant leg room and quiet ride make one feel like they are riding in a much more expensive automobile. Studebaker knew how to build a great car, they just needed to upsell it rather than market them as being in the "Lower Priced Field".
                      I agree that the 50 Commander has a great ride, as well as great fuel economy and good power. Even my 1950 Champion 2 door sedan has a great ride and good fuel economy. People that ride in it make the same comment about what a nice quiet, smooth, comfortable ride it gives.

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                      • #12
                        Originally posted by Commander Eddie View Post
                        I guess Land Cruiser is spelled "C-h-a-m-p-i-o-n" in their neck of the woods.
                        Must be all that "stuff" they grow down there.

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