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Any Advice for Restoring Flocking for Studebaker Trunks

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  • Any Advice for Restoring Flocking for Studebaker Trunks

    I was wondering how many years did studebaker line trunks with flocking? And, is there some way to redo it?

    My restored 1950 Champion just has paint over some rough surface now. It's probably undercoating or actually it looks like sand mixed in with the paint to give it a rough texture. I'd like to have it flocked like the factory did it.

  • #2
    I remember seeing quite a few of the '47-'52 Studes. with that strange, fleecy coating in the trunk, always a Brown color.

    Since they were all from the Studebaker Dealer's used car lot where Dad worked.
    I always thought it was part of the Detailing that Dealers did to spruce up the Trunk of the Used Cars.

    If someone has info about it being a Factory process I'd like to hear about it.
    StudeRich
    Second Generation Stude Driver,
    Proud '54 Starliner Owner

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    • #3
      For a few years during the late 60s in Pennsylvania there was a craze to flock cars.
      I think one of the Batmobiles was flocked.
      It looked goofy on the outside of a car.
      Wonder if you could find someone with the know how and supplies to flock your trunk.
      South Lompoc Studebaker

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      • #4
        I've done a few trunk flockings on my 41's. At the time I got the correct color flock from Tom Shrock. He has also none a few. They make flock spray guns. But I just used spray glue and sprinkled the flock on.

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        • #5
          You have to be careful when applying it so that you don't flock yourself.

          Hey, somebody had to get that out of the way.
          Proud NON-CASO

          I do not prize the word "cheap." It is not a badge of honor...it is a symbol of despair. ~ William McKinley

          If it is decreed that I should go down, then let me go down linked with the truth—let me die in the advocacy of what is just and right.- Lincoln

          GOD BLESS AMERICA

          Ephesians 6:10-17
          Romans 15:13
          Deuteronomy 31:6
          Proverbs 28:1

          Illegitimi non carborundum

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          • #6
            Here's one source...

            http://www.flockit.com/
            HTIH (Hope The Info Helps)

            Jeff


            Get your facts first, and then you can distort them as much as you please. Mark Twain



            Note: SDC# 070190 (and earlier...)

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            • #7
              Hey, Flock off!!!


              Sorry, I couldn't help myself...
              Tom - Bradenton, FL

              1964 Studebaker Daytona - 289 4V, 4-Speed (Cost To Date: $2514.10)
              1964 Studebaker Commander - 170 1V, 3-Speed w/OD

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              • #8
                I did a 51 Pontiac once in the sixtees. I bought a kit from Warner Electric and I came across it recently while overhauling my woodworking shop. It has the pump spray gun and some small bottles of flocking as well as a full (about 1/2 quart) of brown. The green I must have used up except what I believe is left in the sprayer.
                If anyone is interested $20.00 plus postage.
                Nick

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                • #9
                  (Just be careful when you Google search flocking......)

                  Did you know there are over 50 shades of grey flocking?
                  HTIH (Hope The Info Helps)

                  Jeff


                  Get your facts first, and then you can distort them as much as you please. Mark Twain



                  Note: SDC# 070190 (and earlier...)

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Gee...the topics we find here! This one reminds me of the time, while still in college, I got hired as a second shift supervisor at a huge textile flocking plant. Yes...a SUPERVISOR...with zero experience! One of the worst jobs I ever had. Hot southern summer, very little air conditioning, lots of responsibility, and very little authority to match the responsibility. Not only did I have to keep the plant running, but, if anyone laid out of work, I had to run their work station as well.

                    The thing that saved me was that it turned out that my wife was allergic to the itchy peach fuzz like flocking material. I'd come home from work and the sneezing, wheezing, and almost asthmatic symptoms would begin. Gave me a very good excuse to extract myself from a couple months of the most miserable entanglement I had ever gotten myself into.

                    As to the process...Flocking works best when you have a method to "orient" the fibers. We did it by an electrostatic process. As in painting, the fiber particles were passed through an electrostatic charge on their way to the substrate. In our operation, it was a sheet of fabric just after it had glue applied by passing under a "spreader bar" that controlled the amount of glue applied across the width of the cloth. Underneath the cloth, was a stainless steel roller. The roller was "grounded" and the charged fibers would be impaled into the glue as they were attracted to the grounded bar under the cloth.

                    In my opinion, just because the factory had a "bad idea," back in the day, shouldn't make us obligated to perpetuate it for the sake of restoration accuracy. That statement is not intended as a "put-down" to those who wish to recreate the flocking. But, until this post, I hadn't really ever noticed any flocking in a Studebaker trunk. Also, I have not looked at the flocking link provided, (too lazy), but just wondering...if a hillbilly flocking gun could be created by using simple pvc pipe. Say...using a "T" fitting to make a plastic cross. Using a blow gun to provide suction and atomizing air to blast the flocking media. As it passes through the plastic, the friction imparting an electrostatic charge into the flock and your pre-glued "grounded" metal trunk providing the substrate. Of course, doing this in a very low humidity environment would be best.

                    Next, would be spending years cleaning flock fuzz from everything you didn't want it to stick to....including your wife!
                    John Clary
                    Greer, SC

                    SDC member since 1975

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                    • #11
                      I remember occasionally seeing articles about the flocking process in some of my woodworking magazine. They use that stuff inside of jewelry box and display cabinet projects. I bet if you go to some of the online sites for various woodworking magazines and search their archives you'll find some articles on the process.
                      Mike O'Handley, Cat Herder Third Class
                      Kenmore, Washington
                      hausdok@msn.com

                      '58 Packard Hawk
                      '05 Subaru Baja Turbo
                      '71 Toyota Crown Coupe
                      '69 Pontiac Firebird
                      (What is it with me and discontinued/orphan cars?)

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                      • #12
                        I have the flocking gun and a few sacks of original flocking. Just finished flocking the trunk of my '40 Commander.
                        Richard Quinn
                        Editor emeritus: Antique Studebaker Review

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