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First Look at a 1950 Champion Engine

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  • First Look at a 1950 Champion Engine

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    Last edited by Studebaker Ron; 03-02-2015, 07:50 PM.

  • #2
    Number 3 is wet on top of the piston. Did this engine burn oil or smoke? I wonder what caused all the broken springs? I've rarely had broken springs on the engines I've worked on. Pay attention to the third piston for broken or stuck rings, which could cause the wet carbon.

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    • #3
      If all one does is add oil and not change it conditions like what you encountered can be met. By the look of the outside of the engine it was not well taken care of. All in all it still looks like it is a good core for a rebuild. Time will tell, once it's cleaner.

      Valve springs? I can only imagine.

      Len

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      • #4
        Tom/Len
        I only drove the car 300 miles before I started to hear the knocking from the engine. I had a little smoke at start up but this went away after a few minutes of running. The outside condition of the engine was due to leaking seals that I am sure were leaking for years. As I get further into this engine I will start taking measurements. Does anyone have the original Cam Specifications for 1950 170? At this point I do not know if the cam needs to be replaced or not.

        Thanks
        Ron

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        • #5
          Forgot to mention no broken or stuck rings as the engine turns by hand with ease.

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          • #6
            If that Piggy is going offsite for Hot Tanking, just be very sure that you do not miss removing EVERYTHING from the Block for through cleaning AND loss/damage prevention.

            All 1/8" Pipe Plugs in the Oil Galleys
            The "splash plates" in the Valve chambers
            The Oil filler Pipe

            Pay SPECIAL attention to how the Oil Pump is put together, as it is permanently TIMED to the Distributor, if you can find a way to mark the orientation of the drive gear to the camshaft it would help, maybe just a drawing of it's clocking.

            The extreme Sludge buildup is for several reasons, it was not so much the QUALITY of the old Oil, but the fact that most of it was probably Non-Detergent!
            The other problem was probably non-frequent Oil Changes.


            Good luck with Miss Piggy!
            StudeRich
            Second Generation Stude Driver,
            Proud '54 Starliner Owner

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            • #7
              I agree with Rich that the engine likely used non detergent oil and may have had not so frequent oil changes. The hot tank will destroy any bearings, including camshaft bearing inserts. I used to hot tank engines where I worked in the early 80's, but it seems hard to find anyone doing it anymore. The solution was easily neutralized and washed down the drain when it was time for a change, but that probably wasn't good enough for EPA.

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              • #8
                Do you think I need a new cam or can I use the old one?

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by Studebaker Ron View Post
                  Do you think I need a new cam or can I use the old one?
                  Look at the cam lobes and lifter bottoms to see if they show any wear. If the lifters are slightly concave, or if you can see some lobes are less than others, it might be time for new parts.

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                  • #10
                    Thanks Tom

                    Rich
                    Miss Piggy is going back to my friends Transmission shop and has a date with his large cleaning tank. I do not think its a traditional hot dip but it will remove the sludge. I was then going to have the outside portion of the block media blasted prior to painting it.

                    Ron

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                    • #11
                      How will you get all the media out of the oil passages, cooling chambers, etc.? It probably should have been blasted before it was taken apart. I blasted my Model A blocks, but they are a simpler block than a Stude six. I use compressed air and gas with a syphon sprayer to clean all the media out of my Model A blocks. After the block is completely dry I then use compressed air and blow out every passage again.
                      Last edited by TWChamp; 03-04-2015, 01:09 AM.

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                      • #12
                        The term media blast covers a lot of things, some are very difficult to remove from engine parts, I would suggest not using anything other than soda blasting on the block. Lamar

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                        • #13
                          Thanks Lamar
                          Will Soda Blasting remove all the rust on the engine block? It does not have heavy rust as this is a Carolina can that did not go through road salt but it still does have some rust.

                          Ron

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                          • #14
                            I would just wire brush the outside of the block with a Hand Brush, if there is very stubborn rust, hit it with the circular Wire Brush in your Drill.

                            Some Primer or Red Casting Sealer (Glyptal) before the Studebaker Olive Green Enamel Top Coat should take care of the problem.

                            Sand Blasting is about the Only method that will remove Rust, but DON'T do it!
                            You could end up with the prettiest, cleanest, newest Engine that ever threw a Rod!
                            Last edited by StudeRich; 03-04-2015, 03:56 PM.
                            StudeRich
                            Second Generation Stude Driver,
                            Proud '54 Starliner Owner

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                            • #15
                              don't forget the oil pressure bypass on the side of the block near the timing cover.....

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