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  • Good Studebaker day.

    I actually got several things accomplished today.

    First event was I got a Weasel engine fired up and run for a spell. This engine came out of an unbelievably rusty parts Weasel I bought from Marlen Halvorson in Glasgow, MT. Funny thing, even though the hull and undercarriage of this Weasel are all but a total loss, the power train was in primo condition. The engine appeared to be stuck when I got it, but the problem turned out to be the fact that the transmission was locked in first and third at the same time. That'll do it every time. I took the top cover off the tranny, and un-jammed it, and it looks brand new inside. nary a chip out of any of the gears, and shiny inside, too.

    Likewise, the engine's oil pan, although badly dented, was bright and shiny inside, and had only a minute layer of sludge. Took the head off, and there was zero ridge in the cylinders. It really looks like this Weasel got a new engine and transmission, did a few miles, and died. The front U-joint was busted through the trunnion, and I think the driver must have selected two gears at once while moving, and everything went Ka-Bang!

    So I dressed this engine up to fit a 2R5, since a fellow in Nova Scotia needs a truck motor. I ran it for a few seconds on Sunday, but today, I hooked up a rad and filled it with water, and let it run for about 10 minutes, until it was well warmed up. Shows better than 35 PSI oil pressure at idle, and over 60 when revved up. Compression is 110 - 125 PSI on all cylinders except #3, which seems to have a stuck valve, showing only about 10 pounds. Didn't blow any blue smoke, although a 10 minute run test is scarcely sufficient to rule out oil consumption. The new oil I put in stayed nice and clean. When I drained the water from the block, it was the color of weak tea.

    Looks like I got lucky with this engine, and will be able to pass it along to a guy who needs it. It's a real Weasel engine, too, T24 serial number, and cast iron pistons in it. I didn't pull any rod caps, but I'll bet it has Babbitt bearings in the rods, too. The stuck valve is no big deal, as this engine should be stripped to the short block and all gaskets replaced, and then painted up to look nice in its new home. The valves could all be given a lapping-in while the head and manifold are off. I didn't do it while I had it apart, as I was more concerned with seeing if it would run at all.

    This evening, I spent some hours in the shop, and assembled a 12 volt starter for a Champion or OHV six that I had glass-beaded last summer. The starter drive was stuck, and I freed that up. Brushes and commutator looked good, as were the bushings. I assembled it and gave it a shot of black paint from a rattle can. Not "rebuilt" but definitely refurbished, and ready to use if needed.

    Once that was on the shelf, I tore into a V8 water pump, or two, to be exact. The first one, which was pretty rusty, I busted when I tried to use my hydraulic press to push the bearing assembly out through the impeller. So that's not the way to do it! The second, I used a 3-jaw puller to put heavy tension on the impeller, then applied a little heat to the hub area of the impeller with the acetylene torch. It went "snap" and moved a touch, and further turning on the puller wrench spun it right off. Then I pressed the bearing/shaft assembly out of the housing, and pressed the flange off the front end of the shaft. The most time was spent finding and gathering the needed assortment of spacers, etc. needed to set it up in the press. Then I installed a new mechanical seal on the inner end of the shaft, pressed on the impeller, and then pressed the flange on the front end. All that remains to be done is to cut off the excess shaft on both ends with a zip wheel in the die grinder, as I used a Chevy bearing which is long on both ends. So now I have a rebuilt V8 water pump (non-heavy duty) in stock for future use.

    Oops, forgot. One other part I cleaned up was a steering center pivot that had gone through the glass beader. I took it apart, and found it had been stuck
    Gord Richmond, within Weasel range of the Alberta Badlands

  • #2
    Not only did you get a few things done Gord; you wrote them down as well. Reading this first thing in the morning while creativity is at its peak, I sense a new series for TW. I think a short column like this every so often (in other words, whenever you get something done) would be an inspiration to readers. There are even tech tips in here. What do you say? Does anyone else agree?

    Comment


    • #3
      Not only did you get a few things done Gord; you wrote them down as well. Reading this first thing in the morning while creativity is at its peak, I sense a new series for TW. I think a short column like this every so often (in other words, whenever you get something done) would be an inspiration to readers. There are even tech tips in here. What do you say? Does anyone else agree?

      Comment


      • #4
        Totally, Art!
        Gord is always inspiring and 'get off the couch' stuff is what a lot of us need.

        Comment


        • #5
          Totally, Art!
          Gord is always inspiring and 'get off the couch' stuff is what a lot of us need.

          Comment


          • #6
            Well I don't own a couch (nor a T.V.) so I can't come up with an excuse. Yesterday, when I tired of doing some accounting and I couldn't think of anything to write I actually figured out the problem of the carb linkage on my 64 Daytona. Being NON- mechanical (in other words -- inept) I was ecstatic. It gives one a rush when one accomplishes something -- a feeling akin to falling in love )if I remember correctly).
            So I had a good Studebaker day as well.

            Comment


            • #7
              Well I don't own a couch (nor a T.V.) so I can't come up with an excuse. Yesterday, when I tired of doing some accounting and I couldn't think of anything to write I actually figured out the problem of the carb linkage on my 64 Daytona. Being NON- mechanical (in other words -- inept) I was ecstatic. It gives one a rush when one accomplishes something -- a feeling akin to falling in love )if I remember correctly).
              So I had a good Studebaker day as well.

              Comment


              • #8
                FWIW, I'd enjoy reading such a column!


                [img=left]http://members.cox.net/clarknovak/lark.gif[/img=left]

                Clark in San Diego
                '63 F2/Lark Standard
                http://studeblogger.blogspot.com
                www.studebakersandiego.com

                Clark in San Diego | '63 Standard (F2) "Barney" | http://studeblogger.blogspot.com

                Comment


                • #9
                  FWIW, I'd enjoy reading such a column!


                  [img=left]http://members.cox.net/clarknovak/lark.gif[/img=left]

                  Clark in San Diego
                  '63 F2/Lark Standard
                  http://studeblogger.blogspot.com
                  www.studebakersandiego.com

                  Clark in San Diego | '63 Standard (F2) "Barney" | http://studeblogger.blogspot.com

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    That is a good day,Gord.Well done.
                    In the FWIW category,I have been parting out the '55 President coupe Iposted pictures of and I never really looked the car over except ro take pictures.I was digging into the interior and when I removed the clock the paper booklet from Borg giving details about the clock was still tied to the wiring and in excellent shape.Nice surprise.Then I noticed there was a third pedal on the drivers side floorboard.Seemed odd as it had the A/T pedal and quandrant on the column,assumed it was a auto.Jacked up the side and discovered a 3 sp. w O.D.Feeling this was my lucky day I scraped the gunk off the rear end and found the numbers 44 cast on there.Tag says 31 but no tag identifying it as a TT.Decided to quit while I was ahead.
                    Mono mind in a stereo world

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      That is a good day,Gord.Well done.
                      In the FWIW category,I have been parting out the '55 President coupe Iposted pictures of and I never really looked the car over except ro take pictures.I was digging into the interior and when I removed the clock the paper booklet from Borg giving details about the clock was still tied to the wiring and in excellent shape.Nice surprise.Then I noticed there was a third pedal on the drivers side floorboard.Seemed odd as it had the A/T pedal and quandrant on the column,assumed it was a auto.Jacked up the side and discovered a 3 sp. w O.D.Feeling this was my lucky day I scraped the gunk off the rear end and found the numbers 44 cast on there.Tag says 31 but no tag identifying it as a TT.Decided to quit while I was ahead.
                      Mono mind in a stereo world

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Every time I feel like I accomplished something I read one of Gord's posts and I feel like I ought to go work on something

                        for the record, this evening I drained down the water in my house (AGAIN) and replaced the drain valve on the main water heater. Woo hoo. Used a dielectric nipple, ball valve, and NPT to garden hose adapter rather than using one of those cheezy spigot things... got sick of having them leak and having to cap them off all the time. Also drained the garage completely since it'll probably freeze in a couple weeks anyway. checked the anode in the water heater in the garage, it was fine. Not real interesting or Stude related, but I did accomplish something, goshdarnit!

                        nate

                        --
                        55 Commander Starlight
                        http://members.cox.net/njnagel
                        --
                        55 Commander Starlight
                        http://members.cox.net/njnagel

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Every time I feel like I accomplished something I read one of Gord's posts and I feel like I ought to go work on something

                          for the record, this evening I drained down the water in my house (AGAIN) and replaced the drain valve on the main water heater. Woo hoo. Used a dielectric nipple, ball valve, and NPT to garden hose adapter rather than using one of those cheezy spigot things... got sick of having them leak and having to cap them off all the time. Also drained the garage completely since it'll probably freeze in a couple weeks anyway. checked the anode in the water heater in the garage, it was fine. Not real interesting or Stude related, but I did accomplish something, goshdarnit!

                          nate

                          --
                          55 Commander Starlight
                          http://members.cox.net/njnagel
                          --
                          55 Commander Starlight
                          http://members.cox.net/njnagel

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            N8, you have to keep the house unit in order, or else you won't have a roof over your head while you wrench on Studebakers.

                            I got a heads-up today that I might have to go back to work for a spell, so I spent the day cleaning up some the junk in the yard out by the shop. I tore apart a Champion six that I'd got from a friend up the road. It had been "overhauled" by someone who didn't do a great job. #3 cylinder has a big gouge in it where the wrist pin drifted into it. #5 piston is cracked in the skirt, and missing a chunk of the ring land below the oil ring. Anybody have an extra .030" oversize Champion piston on hand? I could use this piston set in another block if I had a replacement for the busted one.

                            Got that block and another I'd stripped into the bucket of the loader and toted them to the barn. Picked up the Weasel engine I'd been working on, and toted it into my new building and set it on a pallet. That necessitated getting the little Crosley (a redundancy if I ever heard one) started, and moved outside. Wouldn't you know it, after it cranked enough to pump fuel up from the tank, it started right up. You have to like that!

                            In the meantime, I had earlier tried to start my old '86 Suburban, and found the batteries dead flat. I had them on the charger most of the afternoon. As the sun was going down, I kicked on the electric fuel pump, and primed the injection pump, then hit the glowplug button. Once the glowplugs had done their thing, I hit the starter, and it cranked for about 2 seconds and started right up. It doesn't get any better than that. I pulled it over by the shop, and poured a couple of gallons of Diesel fuel in the tank, and put the charger back on it, at the 2-amp rate for overnight. I intend to sell this rig to my neighbor for a dollar. He needs a vehicle to tow his travel trailer, and the old 'burb is up to that, plus having room for the kids inside. I already have another backup Suburban, so the old blue one is simply spending all its time sitting. Better it get used. Deal is, if it up and dies, or he quits using it, I'll buy it back for a dollar, too. That old 6.2 Diesel just keeps going and going.

                            So, some of the junk lying around the yard is now safely put away, and I'm more in shape for when the snow flies. I've pretty much given up on getting a concrete floor poured in my shop this Fall; it's going to have to wait until Spring.

                            Gord Richmond, within Weasel range of the Alberta Badlands
                            Gord Richmond, within Weasel range of the Alberta Badlands

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              N8, you have to keep the house unit in order, or else you won't have a roof over your head while you wrench on Studebakers.

                              I got a heads-up today that I might have to go back to work for a spell, so I spent the day cleaning up some the junk in the yard out by the shop. I tore apart a Champion six that I'd got from a friend up the road. It had been "overhauled" by someone who didn't do a great job. #3 cylinder has a big gouge in it where the wrist pin drifted into it. #5 piston is cracked in the skirt, and missing a chunk of the ring land below the oil ring. Anybody have an extra .030" oversize Champion piston on hand? I could use this piston set in another block if I had a replacement for the busted one.

                              Got that block and another I'd stripped into the bucket of the loader and toted them to the barn. Picked up the Weasel engine I'd been working on, and toted it into my new building and set it on a pallet. That necessitated getting the little Crosley (a redundancy if I ever heard one) started, and moved outside. Wouldn't you know it, after it cranked enough to pump fuel up from the tank, it started right up. You have to like that!

                              In the meantime, I had earlier tried to start my old '86 Suburban, and found the batteries dead flat. I had them on the charger most of the afternoon. As the sun was going down, I kicked on the electric fuel pump, and primed the injection pump, then hit the glowplug button. Once the glowplugs had done their thing, I hit the starter, and it cranked for about 2 seconds and started right up. It doesn't get any better than that. I pulled it over by the shop, and poured a couple of gallons of Diesel fuel in the tank, and put the charger back on it, at the 2-amp rate for overnight. I intend to sell this rig to my neighbor for a dollar. He needs a vehicle to tow his travel trailer, and the old 'burb is up to that, plus having room for the kids inside. I already have another backup Suburban, so the old blue one is simply spending all its time sitting. Better it get used. Deal is, if it up and dies, or he quits using it, I'll buy it back for a dollar, too. That old 6.2 Diesel just keeps going and going.

                              So, some of the junk lying around the yard is now safely put away, and I'm more in shape for when the snow flies. I've pretty much given up on getting a concrete floor poured in my shop this Fall; it's going to have to wait until Spring.

                              Gord Richmond, within Weasel range of the Alberta Badlands
                              Gord Richmond, within Weasel range of the Alberta Badlands

                              Comment

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