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  • Skip Lackie
    replied
    WRT battery life, there was a thread earlier this year.
    http://www.studebakerdriversclub.com...=delco+battery

    Along the lines of checking (or failing to check) routine maintenance items, I noticed that I have become lax in checking the water in my 6-volt batteries. Now that all the 12-volt batteries are maintenance-free, I no longer think to check the water in the 6-volt vehicles. And BTW, why do 6v batteries require water while 12v batteries do not? There's no difference in the technology . . . .

    Skip Lackie
    Washington DC

    Leave a comment:


  • Skip Lackie
    replied
    WRT battery life, there was a thread earlier this year.
    http://www.studebakerdriversclub.com...=delco+battery

    Along the lines of checking (or failing to check) routine maintenance items, I noticed that I have become lax in checking the water in my 6-volt batteries. Now that all the 12-volt batteries are maintenance-free, I no longer think to check the water in the 6-volt vehicles. And BTW, why do 6v batteries require water while 12v batteries do not? There's no difference in the technology . . . .

    Skip Lackie
    Washington DC

    Leave a comment:


  • PlainBrownR2
    replied
    I'll add one in as well, and this is probably the equivalent of lubing the chain and the gear on the bicycle....
    Well you checked all the fluids on top, now how about the ones on the bottom? Most oil changes I get under the car and give my zerks a quick squirt from the grease gun. I also get under behind the car and look at my rear differential fluid. If I don't see any level with the fill hole, I add some until it comes out the fill hole. I dunno how the rest of yall do this(this works for me pretty well) but this is a fairly important fluid as its responsible for lubing the items that turn your wheels back there. I usually get back there probably every few months or so. For yall that don't look back there very often I have an example here. We have a 95 Jimmy here we had gotten a little lax on checking the front differential on. More like the vehicle was never in the driveway long enough for us to look it over and from the driver it was "making funny noises". Well, lets just say the shop enjoyed our business replacing some blown seals in the front hub assemblies.

    Oh you want scary that the cars are getting smarter than we are? The new Buick Enclave. Headlights turn when you look in a certain direction(Tucker would be proud, lol). Automatic climate control for when your sitting directly in the sun. The BMW is even freakier as it has a windshield that, through turning on the wipers or monitoring the rain on the windshield it starts drying out the brakes(I assume heated calipers or something to that caliber). They're running the commercials for the two and the way they described the Enclave I swear I was waiting for the voice from 2001: A Space Odyssey.
    Activate the climate controls Hal, I'm freezing my you know whats off!!
    I'm sorry Dave, I can't allow that!! [)]


    1964 Studebaker Commander R2 clone
    1950 Studebaker 2R5 with 170 turbocharged
    [img=left]http://i158.photobucket.com/albums/t102/PlainBrownR2/DSC00003.jpg?t=1171152673[/img=left]
    [img=right]http://i158.photobucket.com/albums/t102/PlainBrownR2/DSC00009.jpg?t=1171153019[/img=right]
    [img=left]http://i158.photobucket.com/albums/t102/PlainBrownR2/DSC00002.jpg?t=1171153180[/img=left]
    [img=right]http://i158.photobucket.com/albums/t102/PlainBrownR2/DSC00005.jpg?t=1171153370[/img=right]

    Leave a comment:


  • PlainBrownR2
    replied
    I'll add one in as well, and this is probably the equivalent of lubing the chain and the gear on the bicycle....
    Well you checked all the fluids on top, now how about the ones on the bottom? Most oil changes I get under the car and give my zerks a quick squirt from the grease gun. I also get under behind the car and look at my rear differential fluid. If I don't see any level with the fill hole, I add some until it comes out the fill hole. I dunno how the rest of yall do this(this works for me pretty well) but this is a fairly important fluid as its responsible for lubing the items that turn your wheels back there. I usually get back there probably every few months or so. For yall that don't look back there very often I have an example here. We have a 95 Jimmy here we had gotten a little lax on checking the front differential on. More like the vehicle was never in the driveway long enough for us to look it over and from the driver it was "making funny noises". Well, lets just say the shop enjoyed our business replacing some blown seals in the front hub assemblies.

    Oh you want scary that the cars are getting smarter than we are? The new Buick Enclave. Headlights turn when you look in a certain direction(Tucker would be proud, lol). Automatic climate control for when your sitting directly in the sun. The BMW is even freakier as it has a windshield that, through turning on the wipers or monitoring the rain on the windshield it starts drying out the brakes(I assume heated calipers or something to that caliber). They're running the commercials for the two and the way they described the Enclave I swear I was waiting for the voice from 2001: A Space Odyssey.
    Activate the climate controls Hal, I'm freezing my you know whats off!!
    I'm sorry Dave, I can't allow that!! [)]


    1964 Studebaker Commander R2 clone
    1950 Studebaker 2R5 with 170 turbocharged
    [img=left]http://i158.photobucket.com/albums/t102/PlainBrownR2/DSC00003.jpg?t=1171152673[/img=left]
    [img=right]http://i158.photobucket.com/albums/t102/PlainBrownR2/DSC00009.jpg?t=1171153019[/img=right]
    [img=left]http://i158.photobucket.com/albums/t102/PlainBrownR2/DSC00002.jpg?t=1171153180[/img=left]
    [img=right]http://i158.photobucket.com/albums/t102/PlainBrownR2/DSC00005.jpg?t=1171153370[/img=right]

    Leave a comment:


  • sirbum
    replied
    Some more commentary on tires again. I had heard or thought I heard of a digital air gauge that could read tire pressure? All it had to do was make contact with a sidewall tire surface. True? Anyone else see this? And next, of course, there is nitrogen filled tires (Costco makes them available to its members), an additional charge at tire stores. Of course, this are not a panacea. Nitrogen molecules are larger than oxygen molecules, thereby allowing nitrogen to last three-to-four times longer without escaping a tire enclosure. Good, but still not totally worry-free. And lastly, run- flat tires that carry no air is probably the best solution. I know that Corvettes can be ordered with such from the G.M. people, don't know if other car makers offer them. Sure, if we all live long enough there will finally be nothing but run-flat tires or some type of rubber, plastic composite that no longer has the work or worry of filling it with air. See you in the next generation.

    Leave a comment:


  • sirbum
    replied
    Some more commentary on tires again. I had heard or thought I heard of a digital air gauge that could read tire pressure? All it had to do was make contact with a sidewall tire surface. True? Anyone else see this? And next, of course, there is nitrogen filled tires (Costco makes them available to its members), an additional charge at tire stores. Of course, this are not a panacea. Nitrogen molecules are larger than oxygen molecules, thereby allowing nitrogen to last three-to-four times longer without escaping a tire enclosure. Good, but still not totally worry-free. And lastly, run- flat tires that carry no air is probably the best solution. I know that Corvettes can be ordered with such from the G.M. people, don't know if other car makers offer them. Sure, if we all live long enough there will finally be nothing but run-flat tires or some type of rubber, plastic composite that no longer has the work or worry of filling it with air. See you in the next generation.

    Leave a comment:


  • hank63
    replied
    Heat is no friend of batteries, anything over 3 years life is a bonus in hot climates.
    Also, the battery acid is not the same for hot and cold climates. Where there are cold winters, the specific gravity is higher (say 1.28 perhaps). In hot climates the s.g. will be lower (say 1.26).
    /H

    Leave a comment:


  • hank63
    replied
    Heat is no friend of batteries, anything over 3 years life is a bonus in hot climates.
    Also, the battery acid is not the same for hot and cold climates. Where there are cold winters, the specific gravity is higher (say 1.28 perhaps). In hot climates the s.g. will be lower (say 1.26).
    /H

    Leave a comment:


  • vegas paul
    replied
    Out here in the desert, 2 to 2.5 years is about it for batteries. I assume Phoenix is similar. I buy the inexpensive ones on sale (when it's convenient for me!) at 2 year intervals, using my birthday as a reminder. It makes no sense to buy an expensive "long life" battery, when for the amount of the pro-rate, you can buy a new one every 2 years. After all, you can only get the pro-rate back on an expensive battery once it has failed, which means you've been stuck. I'd rather buy a replacement battery knowing there is still some life left in the old one instead of being stranded with a dead battery.

    Las Vegas, NV
    '51 Champion Business Coupe G899965 10G-Q4-1434

    Leave a comment:


  • vegas paul
    replied
    Out here in the desert, 2 to 2.5 years is about it for batteries. I assume Phoenix is similar. I buy the inexpensive ones on sale (when it's convenient for me!) at 2 year intervals, using my birthday as a reminder. It makes no sense to buy an expensive "long life" battery, when for the amount of the pro-rate, you can buy a new one every 2 years. After all, you can only get the pro-rate back on an expensive battery once it has failed, which means you've been stuck. I'd rather buy a replacement battery knowing there is still some life left in the old one instead of being stranded with a dead battery.

    Las Vegas, NV
    '51 Champion Business Coupe G899965 10G-Q4-1434

    Leave a comment:


  • DilloCrafter
    replied
    quote:Originally posted by cjsteak

    My 1995 F150 (208k and still runs like new ) Had it's original battery until 2004. I figured it had to be a record of some sort. It was a Motorcraft battery and was date coded 1994 which is common for Ford "soft" parts to be dated a year or two prior to actual use.

    Chris Salisbury
    Hutto/Austin, TX

    1958 Commander Starlight Hardtop
    Chris, that probably IS a record for Central Texas, where a battery is lucky to make it 3-4 years. Too much heat here. How do they stand it in Phoenix?

    [img=left]http://rocketdillo.com/studebaker/misc/images/Avacar-hcsdc.gif[/img=left]DilloCrafter

    1955 1/2 Ton Pickup
    The Red-Headed Amazon
    Deep in the heart of Texas

    Leave a comment:


  • DilloCrafter
    replied
    quote:Originally posted by cjsteak

    My 1995 F150 (208k and still runs like new ) Had it's original battery until 2004. I figured it had to be a record of some sort. It was a Motorcraft battery and was date coded 1994 which is common for Ford "soft" parts to be dated a year or two prior to actual use.

    Chris Salisbury
    Hutto/Austin, TX

    1958 Commander Starlight Hardtop
    Chris, that probably IS a record for Central Texas, where a battery is lucky to make it 3-4 years. Too much heat here. How do they stand it in Phoenix?

    [img=left]http://rocketdillo.com/studebaker/misc/images/Avacar-hcsdc.gif[/img=left]DilloCrafter

    1955 1/2 Ton Pickup
    The Red-Headed Amazon
    Deep in the heart of Texas

    Leave a comment:


  • studegary
    replied
    Craig - That must be a Canadian thing. For example, last Thursday, I went to an auction of more than 100 vehicles that were government owned - various police agencies, Office for the Aging, Mental Health Dept., etc., and not one had anything like that sticker. When I worked for a livery company, we had a pre-trip checklist, but I never remember seeing a sticker even similar to the one that you posted. (I didn't want to "reply with quote" in order to prevent redoing your sticker post.)

    Gary L.
    Wappinger, NY

    SDC member since 1968
    Studebaker enthusiast much longer

    Leave a comment:


  • studegary
    replied
    Craig - That must be a Canadian thing. For example, last Thursday, I went to an auction of more than 100 vehicles that were government owned - various police agencies, Office for the Aging, Mental Health Dept., etc., and not one had anything like that sticker. When I worked for a livery company, we had a pre-trip checklist, but I never remember seeing a sticker even similar to the one that you posted. (I didn't want to "reply with quote" in order to prevent redoing your sticker post.)

    Gary L.
    Wappinger, NY

    SDC member since 1968
    Studebaker enthusiast much longer

    Leave a comment:


  • 8E45E
    replied
    quote:Originally posted by sirbum
    Now, as we all know, todays "smart cars" make it too easy and convenient to get lazy.
    As far as I know, most Public Service vehicles STILL have this above the driver's door handle; even on the new ones!



    Craig

    Leave a comment:

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