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Studebaker Horseless Carriage ?

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  • Studebaker Horseless Carriage ?

    Received an email from a friend who was installing a generator at a guys house today and after talking for a while the his customer who is very, very old, he wanted to show my buddy an old car in his garage. Once he saw that it was a Studebaker my friend informed him of my passion for Studebaker/Packards and the guy stated that he "wanted to get rid of it". I am waiting for pics but these are the details that I have so far.....does it sound to far fetched or could this truly be one of the early ones? Here is a portion of his email to me. "I have a customer who was showing me, what he claims is, an 1890-1895 prototype Studebaker in his garage. He said it was verified as original from the Studebaker Museum in 1973, but has since lost the paperwork. The original engine is missing and the original wheels were cut to fit bicycle tires. Everthing else is original. It looks like a horseless carriage. Is this something you would be interested in? "

    Wasn't Studebaker's first car in 1902. Wouldn't the dates mentioned above be to early for a car? This car is way before my time. I am only 42. Any input would be greatly appreciated. Thank you



    58 Packard Wagon (Parade Red)
    58 Packard Wagon (Park Green)
    58 Packard Hardtop (parts car)
    58 Packard Sedan (Shadowtone Red)
    57 Packard Wagon (parts car)
    57 Packard Sedan (parts car)
    62 Daytona (White)
    63 Lark Custom 2 Door Sedan R2 (Super Red)

  • #2
    I think that most of the early Studebakers (with the exception of the electrics) were produced by other manufacturers (i.e. E-M-F and Garford) and badged as Studebakers. Richard Quinn would probably be the most knowledgeable person on this board. Of course, a picture would speak a 1000 words..... Like you, this all occurred before I was born.

    Of course, my latest acquisition is horseless as we speak.




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    • #3
      I think that most of the early Studebakers (with the exception of the electrics) were produced by other manufacturers (i.e. E-M-F and Garford) and badged as Studebakers. Richard Quinn would probably be the most knowledgeable person on this board. Of course, a picture would speak a 1000 words..... Like you, this all occurred before I was born.

      Of course, my latest acquisition is horseless as we speak.




      Join me in removing narcissists, trolls, self annoited "experts" and general idiots via the Ignore button.

      The official SDC Forum heel nipper ���

      �Middle age is when your broad mind and narrow waist begin to change places.� E. Joseph Cossman

      For every mile of road, there are 2 miles of ditch. ���

      "All lies matter - fight the kleptocracy"

      Comment


      • #4
        I'll throw in my two cents worth on this topic, since the idea that there are still odd, old cars stashed away in barns and garages intrigues me and gives me hope that I might find one someday. If this is a true story (no offense to you or your friend, but this is a familiar urban legend story line), I suspect that it is truly a "horseless carriage", which is to say that it was a carriage that was convertyed into an automobile by adding an engine. Many companies offered buggy conversion kits in the early 1900s. Therefore, I suspect it is a "homebuilt" conversion, rather than a factory prototype. Its nothing more than a hunch from the part of my brain that wants to believe that old car is in an old man's garage. Of course, if we could see some pictures, then a more authoritative identification could be made.
        John
        1950 Champion
        W-3 4 Dr. Sedan
        Holdrege NE

        Comment


        • #5
          I'll throw in my two cents worth on this topic, since the idea that there are still odd, old cars stashed away in barns and garages intrigues me and gives me hope that I might find one someday. If this is a true story (no offense to you or your friend, but this is a familiar urban legend story line), I suspect that it is truly a "horseless carriage", which is to say that it was a carriage that was convertyed into an automobile by adding an engine. Many companies offered buggy conversion kits in the early 1900s. Therefore, I suspect it is a "homebuilt" conversion, rather than a factory prototype. Its nothing more than a hunch from the part of my brain that wants to believe that old car is in an old man's garage. Of course, if we could see some pictures, then a more authoritative identification could be made.
          John
          1950 Champion
          W-3 4 Dr. Sedan
          Holdrege NE

          Comment


          • #6
            The August 1996 Turning Wheels contains a detailed report on what was the oldest Studebaker-identified, gasoline-powered automobile extant. Perhaps Dick Quinn will post if anything further has been unearthed since that time. BP
            We've got to quit saying, "How stupid can you be?" Too many people are taking it as a challenge.

            Ayn Rand:
            "You can avoid reality, but you cannot avoid the consequences of avoiding reality."

            G. K. Chesterton: This triangle of truisms, of father, mother, and child, cannot be destroyed; it can only destroy those civilizations which disregard it.

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            • #7
              The August 1996 Turning Wheels contains a detailed report on what was the oldest Studebaker-identified, gasoline-powered automobile extant. Perhaps Dick Quinn will post if anything further has been unearthed since that time. BP
              We've got to quit saying, "How stupid can you be?" Too many people are taking it as a challenge.

              Ayn Rand:
              "You can avoid reality, but you cannot avoid the consequences of avoiding reality."

              G. K. Chesterton: This triangle of truisms, of father, mother, and child, cannot be destroyed; it can only destroy those civilizations which disregard it.

              Comment

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