Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Most Desirable?

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • #31
    quote:Originally posted by KGlowacky

    EASY EASY on us wagon owners. We need some respect, even if it is not genuine.

    Hate to think what they might say about Trucks...!


    <h5>Mark
    '57 Transtar
    3E-6/7-122
    </h5>

    Mark Hayden
    '66 Commander
    Zone Coordinator
    Pacific Can-Am Zone

    Comment


    • #32
      quote:Originally posted by shugnshay

      I've been reading stuff about Studebakers all over the net, and have got yet another question! I see a lot about "most desirable" or "most collectible" year or model. I'm guessing that "most collectible" would pertain to historic occurrences in a certain year, or number of models produced, or something. What constitutes a Studebaker to be "most desirable"? I love them all!
      Going by the market (which usually equals desirability), in descending order...

      1931 President 4-Seasons Roadster, followed by nearly any
      1928-33 President model.
      1937-39 Coupe Express tied with any 1930's Dictator convertible or 1938/39 convertible sedan.
      Genuine R-series Larks/Lark types & Hawks with the FULL 'Super' package.
      Larks/Lark types & Hawks with an R series engine.
      '55 Speedster
      Golden Hawks, possibly the 1956 being the most desirable; 1958 Packard Hawk.
      1963/4 Avantis & cloned R-series Larks & Hawks
      Postwar Convertibles, 1951 Commander the most desirable
      1930's coupes, 1920's tourings, Duplex-Pheatons
      53-54 C/K & 62/4 non-R G.T. Hawks
      Hardtops, not counting Speedsters & Golden Hawks or R-series Larks or others above.
      C-body Hawks (add more if '61 4 speed)
      1947-52 Starlight coupes
      Diesel engined Studebaker trucks
      1920's & 1930's sedans, Land Cruiser/President Classic/1957-58 Packard 4 door sedans.
      1950 & '51 sedans
      Lark Cruisers.
      2R5/E-series Transtar trucks
      all others.

      Craig


      Comment


      • #33
        quote:Originally posted by shugnshay

        I've been reading stuff about Studebakers all over the net, and have got yet another question! I see a lot about "most desirable" or "most collectible" year or model. I'm guessing that "most collectible" would pertain to historic occurrences in a certain year, or number of models produced, or something. What constitutes a Studebaker to be "most desirable"? I love them all!
        Going by the market (which usually equals desirability), in descending order...

        1931 President 4-Seasons Roadster, followed by nearly any
        1928-33 President model.
        1937-39 Coupe Express tied with any 1930's Dictator convertible or 1938/39 convertible sedan.
        Genuine R-series Larks/Lark types & Hawks with the FULL 'Super' package.
        Larks/Lark types & Hawks with an R series engine.
        '55 Speedster
        Golden Hawks, possibly the 1956 being the most desirable; 1958 Packard Hawk.
        1963/4 Avantis & cloned R-series Larks & Hawks
        Postwar Convertibles, 1951 Commander the most desirable
        1930's coupes, 1920's tourings, Duplex-Pheatons
        53-54 C/K & 62/4 non-R G.T. Hawks
        Hardtops, not counting Speedsters & Golden Hawks or R-series Larks or others above.
        C-body Hawks (add more if '61 4 speed)
        1947-52 Starlight coupes
        Diesel engined Studebaker trucks
        1920's & 1930's sedans, Land Cruiser/President Classic/1957-58 Packard 4 door sedans.
        1950 & '51 sedans
        Lark Cruisers.
        2R5/E-series Transtar trucks
        all others.

        Craig


        Comment


        • #34
          After watching Studebaker values for 30 years, I feel safe in saying that Studebaker presently enjoys it's greatest market popularity since production stopped. Of all the postwar models, Hawks are clearly the Stars.

          But almost all Studebakers are enjoying the increased attention. Many probably won't believe me when I point out that Larks are trading at least equal to and in some cases for more than their contemporary counterpart Ford Falcons. This may be due to collector demand, or the fact that the Falcon was late to the game in the early 60's with a sport coupe and convertible. Either way, it shows that any market negatives attached to Studebaker are disappearing, and people are sometimes looking for an alternative to separate themselves from the crowd. Most of us can attest that the days of finding a Studebaker owner who "doesn't know what they have" are LONG behind us.

          Pricing can be fickle. But this is a trend I've noticed for more than the past five years.

          Individual transactions can easily ignore market trends. (I read in Automobile Magazine at the dentist's office about a recent bidding war over a pristine 500 original mile 1971 Ford Pinto that ended at over $43,000!.) As that article's author said, it only takes two to tango.

          Kevin Wolford
          Plymouth, IN

          55 Champion
          60 Lark VI Conv.
          63 Avanti R1

          Comment


          • #35
            After watching Studebaker values for 30 years, I feel safe in saying that Studebaker presently enjoys it's greatest market popularity since production stopped. Of all the postwar models, Hawks are clearly the Stars.

            But almost all Studebakers are enjoying the increased attention. Many probably won't believe me when I point out that Larks are trading at least equal to and in some cases for more than their contemporary counterpart Ford Falcons. This may be due to collector demand, or the fact that the Falcon was late to the game in the early 60's with a sport coupe and convertible. Either way, it shows that any market negatives attached to Studebaker are disappearing, and people are sometimes looking for an alternative to separate themselves from the crowd. Most of us can attest that the days of finding a Studebaker owner who "doesn't know what they have" are LONG behind us.

            Pricing can be fickle. But this is a trend I've noticed for more than the past five years.

            Individual transactions can easily ignore market trends. (I read in Automobile Magazine at the dentist's office about a recent bidding war over a pristine 500 original mile 1971 Ford Pinto that ended at over $43,000!.) As that article's author said, it only takes two to tango.

            Kevin Wolford
            Plymouth, IN

            55 Champion
            60 Lark VI Conv.
            63 Avanti R1

            Comment


            • #36
              While Craig mentions the diesel trucks, no one has mentioned the factory 4 wheel drive units. Much easier to drive and store than a diesel and also produced in low enough numbers to create demand. Remember, Ed Ellis got $50K for his excellent example, an amount I am not aware of any R powered Hawk bringing.


              Comment


              • #37
                While Craig mentions the diesel trucks, no one has mentioned the factory 4 wheel drive units. Much easier to drive and store than a diesel and also produced in low enough numbers to create demand. Remember, Ed Ellis got $50K for his excellent example, an amount I am not aware of any R powered Hawk bringing.


                Comment


                • #38
                  quote:Originally posted by Guido

                  While Craig mentions the diesel trucks, no one has mentioned the factory 4 wheel drive units. Much easier to drive and store than a diesel and also produced in low enough numbers to create demand. Remember, Ed Ellis got $50K for his excellent example, an amount I am not aware of any R powered Hawk bringing.
                  Yep, I should have added them and the Cab Forwards from the 1930's.

                  But then, Ed Ellis 'only' got 2/3rds of what that 1947 'M' series got![:0]

                  Craig

                  Comment


                  • #39
                    quote:Originally posted by Guido

                    While Craig mentions the diesel trucks, no one has mentioned the factory 4 wheel drive units. Much easier to drive and store than a diesel and also produced in low enough numbers to create demand. Remember, Ed Ellis got $50K for his excellent example, an amount I am not aware of any R powered Hawk bringing.
                    Yep, I should have added them and the Cab Forwards from the 1930's.

                    But then, Ed Ellis 'only' got 2/3rds of what that 1947 'M' series got![:0]

                    Craig

                    Comment

                    Working...
                    X