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  • Packard Predictor

    I ended up with a couple extra of these brochures...





    If there are any Packard fans out there that don't have this brochure and want one, send me your snail mail addy through Forum Mail and I'll get one out to you.

    Here is the one at the SNM...




    Dick Steinkamp
    Bellingham, WA

  • #2
    All gone.

    (jeese youse guys are FAST [:0])


    Dick Steinkamp
    Bellingham, WA

    Comment


    • #3
      All gone.

      (jeese youse guys are FAST [:0])


      Dick Steinkamp
      Bellingham, WA

      Comment


      • #4
        The only thing mainstream that matched that Predictor was the 58-9-60 Lincolns! Boats to the extreme![}]

        Miscreant adrift in
        the BerStuda Triangle


        1957 Transtar 1/2ton
        1960 Larkvertible V8
        1958 Provincial wagon
        1953 Commander coupe

        No deceptive flags to prove I'm patriotic - no biblical BS to impress - just ME and Studebakers - as it should be.

        Comment


        • #5
          The only thing mainstream that matched that Predictor was the 58-9-60 Lincolns! Boats to the extreme![}]

          Miscreant adrift in
          the BerStuda Triangle


          1957 Transtar 1/2ton
          1960 Larkvertible V8
          1958 Provincial wagon
          1953 Commander coupe

          No deceptive flags to prove I'm patriotic - no biblical BS to impress - just ME and Studebakers - as it should be.

          Comment


          • #6
            quote:Originally posted by Mr.Biggs

            The only thing mainstream that matched that Predictor was the 58-9-60 Lincolns! Boats to the extreme![}]

            Miscreant adrift in
            the BerStuda Triangle

            Ah, yes, Biggsy; 1958-1960 Lincolns. How I used to look forward to servicing them under a single-post lift in the early 60s at Carl West Shell Service in NE Indianapolis. A specific, if unofficial, procedure had to be followed:

            Step One: Position the lift's moveable arms as far out and forward/backward as possible under the huge Lincoln.

            Step Two: Stand back and gingerly move the lift control valve to the "up" position.

            Step Three: Watch in amusement/amazement/horror as the single-cylinder lift groaned under the heaviest load of the day and s-l-o-w-l-y raised the behemoth to full working height.

            Step Four: Stand back at least one full minute and watch the Lincoln gently bob to and fro a half-inch or so on the fully-elevated lift, waiting patiently until it had settled down and established some sort of tentative equilibrium with nature, tetering six feet in the air on one 12-inch (or thereabouts) hydraulic pedestal.

            Step Five: Grab the oil change tub and a Purolator PER-1 Oil Filter and get the hell under there and back out as quickly as possible, disturbing the fragile equilibrium as little as possible by minimally wrenching the drain plug and oil filter.

            Apply as little downward force as possible to get the upper ball joints to take grease, not wishing to add to the lift's groaning and creaking, despite being fewer than 10 years old when assigned the herculean task of elevating this fully-developed mechanical elephant on steroids. [:0]

            Step Six: Stand back and move the lift control lever gingerly to the "down" position, hoping the cylinder doesn't explode when given the opportunitry to relieve itself of this monstrous burden.

            And if you think all that is an exaggeration, try it sometime!

            (However, my attitude during the assignment was always improved by looking out to the corner of the lot on a warm summer's evening, admiring my 1959 Lark V-8/Power Pack Hardtop, glowing in Tahiti Coral under the big revolving SHELL sign with all its windows down, waiting for the 11:05 PM run to Steak & Shake as soon as we closed the station.)

            Thanks for the memories, Bob! BP
            We've got to quit saying, "How stupid can you be?" Too many people are taking it as a challenge.

            Ayn Rand:
            "You can avoid reality, but you cannot avoid the consequences of avoiding reality."

            G. K. Chesterton: This triangle of truisms, of father, mother, and child, cannot be destroyed; it can only destroy those civilizations which disregard it.

            Comment


            • #7
              quote:Originally posted by Mr.Biggs

              The only thing mainstream that matched that Predictor was the 58-9-60 Lincolns! Boats to the extreme![}]

              Miscreant adrift in
              the BerStuda Triangle

              Ah, yes, Biggsy; 1958-1960 Lincolns. How I used to look forward to servicing them under a single-post lift in the early 60s at Carl West Shell Service in NE Indianapolis. A specific, if unofficial, procedure had to be followed:

              Step One: Position the lift's moveable arms as far out and forward/backward as possible under the huge Lincoln.

              Step Two: Stand back and gingerly move the lift control valve to the "up" position.

              Step Three: Watch in amusement/amazement/horror as the single-cylinder lift groaned under the heaviest load of the day and s-l-o-w-l-y raised the behemoth to full working height.

              Step Four: Stand back at least one full minute and watch the Lincoln gently bob to and fro a half-inch or so on the fully-elevated lift, waiting patiently until it had settled down and established some sort of tentative equilibrium with nature, tetering six feet in the air on one 12-inch (or thereabouts) hydraulic pedestal.

              Step Five: Grab the oil change tub and a Purolator PER-1 Oil Filter and get the hell under there and back out as quickly as possible, disturbing the fragile equilibrium as little as possible by minimally wrenching the drain plug and oil filter.

              Apply as little downward force as possible to get the upper ball joints to take grease, not wishing to add to the lift's groaning and creaking, despite being fewer than 10 years old when assigned the herculean task of elevating this fully-developed mechanical elephant on steroids. [:0]

              Step Six: Stand back and move the lift control lever gingerly to the "down" position, hoping the cylinder doesn't explode when given the opportunitry to relieve itself of this monstrous burden.

              And if you think all that is an exaggeration, try it sometime!

              (However, my attitude during the assignment was always improved by looking out to the corner of the lot on a warm summer's evening, admiring my 1959 Lark V-8/Power Pack Hardtop, glowing in Tahiti Coral under the big revolving SHELL sign with all its windows down, waiting for the 11:05 PM run to Steak & Shake as soon as we closed the station.)

              Thanks for the memories, Bob! BP
              We've got to quit saying, "How stupid can you be?" Too many people are taking it as a challenge.

              Ayn Rand:
              "You can avoid reality, but you cannot avoid the consequences of avoiding reality."

              G. K. Chesterton: This triangle of truisms, of father, mother, and child, cannot be destroyed; it can only destroy those civilizations which disregard it.

              Comment


              • #8
                quote:Originally posted by BobPalma

                Ah, yes, Biggsy; 1958-1960 Lincolns. How I used to look forward to servicing them under a (bla bla bla)....glowing in Tahiti Coral under the big revolving SHELL sign with all its windows down, waiting for the 11:05 PM run to Steak & Shake as soon as we closed the station.)
                Bob, you should be a writer (or something )


                Dick Steinkamp
                Bellingham, WA

                Comment


                • #9
                  quote:Originally posted by BobPalma

                  Ah, yes, Biggsy; 1958-1960 Lincolns. How I used to look forward to servicing them under a (bla bla bla)....glowing in Tahiti Coral under the big revolving SHELL sign with all its windows down, waiting for the 11:05 PM run to Steak & Shake as soon as we closed the station.)
                  Bob, you should be a writer (or something )


                  Dick Steinkamp
                  Bellingham, WA

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Since we are already off topic, I will submit a picture of the model that Sam Miller made. He was using Raymond Loewy's statement that Detroit cars were "Chrome Barges".



                    Leonard Shepherd
                    http://leonardshepherd.com/

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Since we are already off topic, I will submit a picture of the model that Sam Miller made. He was using Raymond Loewy's statement that Detroit cars were "Chrome Barges".



                      Leonard Shepherd
                      http://leonardshepherd.com/

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        it reminds me of the old (but newer) "wide-track pontiac" ads. it seems that all of the old line drawing ads exaggerate the proportions. very sharp packard, though!

                        --george



                        my dad owns Studebakers

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          it reminds me of the old (but newer) "wide-track pontiac" ads. it seems that all of the old line drawing ads exaggerate the proportions. very sharp packard, though!

                          --george



                          my dad owns Studebakers

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            If you ever wondered what the stillborn 1957 Packard big cars would have looked like if produced, take a look at the 1959-1960s Mercurys. No coincidence perhaps that Packard's last president, James Nance, was head of the Lincoln-Edsel-Mercury division at Ford at the time these models were being planned, facelifts both from the 1957 model that bore no Nance imprint. Just guessing here but the 1958s sure looked similar to "Black Bess," the running styling mule built by Packard in late 1956.

                            Studedude1961
                            --1963 Cruiser

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              If you ever wondered what the stillborn 1957 Packard big cars would have looked like if produced, take a look at the 1959-1960s Mercurys. No coincidence perhaps that Packard's last president, James Nance, was head of the Lincoln-Edsel-Mercury division at Ford at the time these models were being planned, facelifts both from the 1957 model that bore no Nance imprint. Just guessing here but the 1958s sure looked similar to "Black Bess," the running styling mule built by Packard in late 1956.

                              Studedude1961
                              --1963 Cruiser

                              Comment

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