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Any other famous "Studes in the News?"

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  • Any other famous "Studes in the News?"

    The 1971 Pamela Jackson / Cheryl Miller tragedy in Elk Point SD has been all over the news, of course, and the accounts invariably mention their driving a 1960 Studebaker, some mention Lark, when they disappeared....and when it and skeletal remains were discovered last year and confirmed in April of this year, to be those of the young ladies.

    I got to thinking and, so far, have not come up with an answer: Can anyone think of another national (not local) news story in which a Studebaker played a major role?

    Examples involving other makes:

    1. Currently on display in the Indianapolis International Airport is a Hudson Terraplane reportedly used by infamous Hoosier John Dillinger, on loan from a museum in Washington DC.

    2. There have been so many examples of "Bonnie & Clyde's" famous 1934(?) Ford displayed through the years that it is difficult to nail down the exact one.

    3. Our own Studebaker National Museum has the carriage that carried Abraham Lincoln to Ford's Theater the night he was assassinated, although it was built by Woods Brothers in New York, not Studebaker.

    4. Of course, the Lincoln in which JFK was riding when he was assassinated in Dallas in November 1963, is displayed at The Henry Ford [Museum] in Dearborn.

    But, doggone it, I can't think of another Big News Story in which a Studebaker was mentioned as frequently as this tragedy out of South Dakota...but certainly, there must be. Can anyone else? (Incidentally, we aren't talking about a news story that reports an eccentric collector with a stash of Studebakers. Most of us would qualify!)

    Ideas? BP
    Last edited by BobPalma; 04-17-2014, 05:48 AM.
    We've got to quit saying, "How stupid can you be?" Too many people are taking it as a challenge.

    Ayn Rand:
    "You can avoid reality, but you cannot avoid the consequences of avoiding reality."

    G. K. Chesterton: This triangle of truisms, of father, mother, and child, cannot be destroyed; it can only destroy those civilizations which disregard it.

  • #2
    I don't understand how a Studebaker carriage can be built by another company and still be called a Studebaker.
    peter lee

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    • #3
      Originally posted by plee4139 View Post
      I don't understand how a Studebaker carriage can be built by another company and still be called a Studebaker.
      It never has been as far as I am aware.

      Chris.

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      • #4
        Yes, the Brinks Robbery in Boston, MA. as I recall the bandits made a get away in a 50 or 51 Studebaker.it was in 1950 they pulled this heist.
        Joseph R. Zeiger

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        • #5
          Not sure how 'national' this one got as far as news coverage: http://forum.studebakerdriversclub.c...hlight=BOMBING

          Craig

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          • #6
            It is easy to keep track of all items on the Web by choosing "Google alerts" and enter "Studebaker"
            Many stories that mention people with the last name of Studebaker but also interesting stuff.

            Robert Kapteyn

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            • #7
              Originally posted by plee4139 View Post
              I don't understand how a Studebaker carriage can be built by another company and still be called a Studebaker.
              Peter: Various sources through the years have reported that the Lincolon carriage was made by Studebaker, but it was NOT. It is NOT a Studebaker-built product, although it was purchased for the Studebaker historic vehicle collection, so it is owned by Studebaker...and, now, The Studebaker National Museum. BP
              We've got to quit saying, "How stupid can you be?" Too many people are taking it as a challenge.

              Ayn Rand:
              "You can avoid reality, but you cannot avoid the consequences of avoiding reality."

              G. K. Chesterton: This triangle of truisms, of father, mother, and child, cannot be destroyed; it can only destroy those civilizations which disregard it.

              Comment


              • #8
                Originally posted by BobPalma View Post
                The 1971 Pamela Jackson / Cheryl Miller tragedy in Elk Point SD has been all over the news, of course, and the accounts invariably mention their driving a 1960 Studebaker, some mention Lark, when they disappeared....and when it and skeletal remains were discovered last year and confirmed in April of this year, to be those of the young ladies.

                I got to thinking and, so far, have not come up with an answer: Can anyone think of another national (not local) news story in which a Studebaker played a major role?
                How about Herb Shriner- killed in his 1963 Avanti in 1964 (http://news.google.com/newspapers?id...45%2C3427312)?
                Paul Johnson, Wild and Wonderful West Virginia.
                '64 Daytona Wagonaire, '64 Avanti R-1, Museum R-4 engine, '72 Gravely Model 430 with Onan engine

                Comment


                • #9
                  'Good ones, Craig and Paul.

                  I also wonder how widsespread was the publicity on that Lark Bombing, Craig. Certainly was criminal activity...I mean, destroying a Studebaker with a bomb ought to be a criminal offense, right? BP
                  We've got to quit saying, "How stupid can you be?" Too many people are taking it as a challenge.

                  Ayn Rand:
                  "You can avoid reality, but you cannot avoid the consequences of avoiding reality."

                  G. K. Chesterton: This triangle of truisms, of father, mother, and child, cannot be destroyed; it can only destroy those civilizations which disregard it.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    I'll apologize ahead for this diversion off the subject of this thread, but the comment of the "Woods Brother's" built carriage in the museum motivated me to make the following comments. In my life, I have had the privilege to have known some rather astounding "self-made" successful entrepreneurs. One trait that all seem to have, aside from being passionately hard working, is an intangible quality that I call "VISION"...for lack of a better term.

                    Some examples of this type of person, are Walt Disney, Ted Turner, Howard Hughes, Donald Trump, Dolly Parton, and the list goes on. I might be wrong about the specific Studebaker brother...but I'm thinking that J. M. Studebaker had this trait. It is my understanding that it was he, that infused the company with money and was the driving personality that spurred the company to become the world's largest producer of horse-drawn vehicles. Part of that "Vision" was to appreciate the historical significance of certain vehicles, and that he began a collection before the significance of "motor vehicles" was realized. It is my understanding (conclusions from bits and pieces, and not well studied...a confession) that the Studebaker Brothers had begun a collection of historic vehicles while Henry Ford (another Visionary) was still tinkering with his contraptions.

                    It is my belief, that, although the Studebaker Corporation had some very capable and interesting characters through the years, that the true Visionaries with the passion and motivation to continue in the "Vehicle" business, never equaled that of J.M. and his brothers. I believe that if it had, a path to continue in the business would have been sustained. When you see all the vehicle companies that have been "born" since...you have to conclude that the market did not fade away...just the desire to negotiate it. I'm sure someone will correct me if I'm wrong...but my impression is that the collection of the "Non-Studebaker" vehicles in the museum can be traced all the way back to the "Vision" of the Studebaker Brothers.
                    John Clary
                    Greer, SC

                    SDC member since 1975

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Just watched the movie Mandella Long Walk to Freedom, Nelson was chased down and captured by a small flock of Studebaker Larks and a 1961 Hawk.
                      StudeRick & Johna
                      Sacramento CA

                      1964 GT Hawk, 1963 GT Hawk, 1962 GT Hawk
                      1957 Silver Hawk
                      1963 Avanti
                      1961 Lark Wagon
                      1963 Lark Daytona

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                      • #12
                        Originally posted by 63t-cab View Post
                        Yes, the Brinks Robbery in Boston, MA. as I recall the bandits made a get away in a 50 or 51 Studebaker. It was in January 1950 they pulled this heist.
                        The Brink's Job getaway vehicle was a 1949 Ford stake bed with a canvas top. The truck was later found cut up with a torch in a Stoughton MA dump.

                        The real Barrow Gang death car, a 1934 Ford deluxe fordor sedan is located at Whisky Pete's Casino in Primm NV

                        During their lifetime and thru 1966, the Barrow Gang were known as Clyde & Bonnie. Name changed to Bonnie & Clyde when 1967 movie came out.

                        John Dillinger was so in favor of the Hudson Terraplane, that he actually purchased one new. No one knows what happened to this car.
                        Last edited by WinM1895; 04-17-2014, 07:56 AM.

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