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  • Carraige Lamp Help.

    Howdy...I am hoping that someone here can help me identify this carriage lamp. I would like to know when it was used and if it was buggy only.

    Any insight would be greatly appreciated.











    Live your dreams!

  • #2
    Oh... without measurements that makes things a bit more difficult. You see, the size of the lamp indicates a great deal as to its intended function. Pony vehicles, for example, used considerably smaller lamps than horse-sized. That said...
    What you have is a typical lamp of the late nineteenth to early twentieth centuries. They were commonly used on light carriages of many descriptions from Buggies to Park Phaetons and light wagons. If you have the pair, they are worth considerably more than a single lamp. Not just twice the value for two lamps, but possibly doubling the value of
    both lamps. However, yours seems to be modified with some kind of addition where the thumb-screw (where it attaches to the lamp bracket) should be. Modifications reduce the value dramatically.

    Another issue is that this lamp is oil instead of candle. Most people prefer the latter because Oil is a bit fussier in a lamp. If the ride is rough they have a tendency to go out. However, Oil does give a much brighter light. So it's really a preference issue.

    It's highly unlikely that Studebaker itself made these lamps. Usually the carriage builder contracted a set number of lamps to be made by a specialized manufacturer and had them badged on the candle or, in this case, font cap. The door (on the back) will likely have a stamp on it identifying the actual maker. The lamp pictured looks to be possibly a Rayodot, from England. However that's just a guess based on the photos.

    If you are looking for a value of this lamp, I would suggest looking up a dealer or restoration service. Both can give you a quote. Here's a link though that might give you an idea as Todd Frey sells lamps both restored and original:

    http://www.colonialcarriage.com/cate...rriage%20Lamps

    Todd has a tendency of pricing quite a bit on the high side. Then again Colonial Carriage is a high-end dealership anyway.

    Best of luck with your beautiful lamp.
    Last edited by studeclunker; 04-12-2014, 10:13 PM.
    Home of the famous Mr. Ed!
    K.I.S.S. Keep It Simple Studebaker!
    Ron Smith
    Where the heck is Fawn Lodge, CA?

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    • #3
      Thanx much for the response. I looked at the link you suggested but I did not really see anything that looked like a comparable. Regardless I appreciate the lead as I had no idea where to look and Google has not offered up much.

      The only nomenclature that I can find on the lamp is the STUDEBAKER on the wick font case. I believe that this is a left side lamp.

      The mounting lug which is not pictured in any of the photos certainly appears to be as to be as original as the rest of the lamp. It is 14 plus inches tall and has the single monting lug on the back. Front glass is 4 3/4 by 4 1/2 and side glass is 4 3/4 by 3 1/2 inches. The door has no markings on it except for the number 10 on the latch portion. There is a 1 1/4 inch red glass ball on the door as well.
      Live your dreams!

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      • #4
        Okay, fourteen inches would be a full-sized vehicle. A pony lamp would be two to four inches shorter. The number on the latch is the model number. There were catalogues devoted just to lamps. Studebaker offered literally hundreds of them for their vehicles.
        The mounting lug is called a thumb screw. These were common in the U.S. There were two mounting systems. One was a loop on a bar that the tail, or Candle stem, dropped into and the other was a post with a thumb-screw on the lamp to secure it. There are aficionados of both types and strong feelings as to which is superior over the other. Personally, I'll take whatever fits my vehicle.
        The little red lens (in the door) is the back of the lamp and equivalent to tail-lamps. Though there were lamps devoted to that as well, they were rarely used on the more work-a-day vehicles such as a wagon, Buggy, or Surrey. Some cities required them, most didn't (at least not in this country).
        judging from the pictures supplied, this is a very handsome, silver mounted (or trimmed), Right-side lamp The mounting fixture is on the inboard side of the lamp and the red Jewell faces to the rear.
        Last edited by studeclunker; 04-13-2014, 08:53 AM.
        Home of the famous Mr. Ed!
        K.I.S.S. Keep It Simple Studebaker!
        Ron Smith
        Where the heck is Fawn Lodge, CA?

        Comment

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