Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Where is this covered wagon?

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Where is this covered wagon?

    I kind of hate to see this thing sitting outside, since it must be rare. Most wagons I see are just regular farm wagons. Now the question is where is it in Oregon. Those bows are probably not original, now that I look at it.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cm5AyQUik7o
    "Madness...is the exception in individuals, but the rule in groups" - Nietzsche.

  • #2
    They don't improve sitting out,like You say.reminds Me of a Covered Wagon that was well/mostly buried in an old dump sight behind the Barn of an old Farm house My Parents bought in 1965.as kids We would play around it,and as i got older always wondered if it was a Studebaker ?
    Joseph R. Zeiger

    Comment


    • #3
      Halsey, OR. On I-5 in central Oregon north of Eugene.

      http://www.yelp.com/biz/pioneer-vill...aza-inc-halsey

      Comment


      • #4
        Thanks, Dwain! Next time I'm going up to Portland I'll look out for it.
        "Madness...is the exception in individuals, but the rule in groups" - Nietzsche.

        Comment


        • #5
          Oh no! Look how it's deteriorated from this photo!
          wagon.jpg

          OR is the photo newer than the movie?
          "Madness...is the exception in individuals, but the rule in groups" - Nietzsche.

          Comment


          • #6
            I am saddened every time I see one of these old wagons being used as "yard art." Even the non-Studebaker wagons are, in my opinion, historic relics. Ideally, they should be stored indoors with enough humidity to keep them from dry rotting.
            John Clary
            Greer, SC

            SDC member since 1975

            Comment


            • #7
              Is there a way to tell if a wagon was built by Studebaker?

              Comment


              • #8
                Not hard to tell that the top bows are not original. Looks better with the covering on it. We still have the wooden bows that my grandad used to cover his load when he hauled freight between Rosebud, Arkansas and Searcy. They were in the barn loft all the time I was growing up and I never realized what they were. The 40+ mile round trip took 2 days with unloading and loading.
                sigpic

                "In the heart of Arkansas."
                Searcy, Arkansas
                1952 Commander 2 door. Really fine 259.
                1952 2R pickup

                Comment


                • #9
                  This Guy has a pretty good Conestoga History Video, but never once mentioned WHO built these, I would think that MOST were probably built by the Worlds Largest Wagon Mfg. !

                  https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-qJ1h9VgIeU
                  StudeRich
                  Second Generation Stude Driver,
                  Proud '54 Starliner Owner



                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Originally posted by jclary View Post
                    I am saddened every time I see one of these old wagons being used as "yard art." Even the non-Studebaker wagons are, in my opinion, historic relics. Ideally, they should be stored indoors with enough humidity to keep them from dry rotting.
                    In Oregon I think it's more like "wet rotting".
                    Ed Sallia
                    Dundee, OR

                    Sol Lucet Omnibus

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      I've read that almost half of the wagons used by settlers heading west were using Studebakers. Pretty amazing.

                      Comment

                      Working...
                      X