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  • #16
    I am now advised that the problem may lie in the rear backing plate that prevents adjustment of the rear brakes. Not a lot of luck finding replacments. I am not sure if the adjuster is part of this or not. My Chassis catalog is not too descriptive. Has anyone had this problem or had to "fix" the rear backing plate.
    The saga continues.

    One bit of good news. I hit a pothole and later discovered that the right front door clearance was nil at the fender. A good body shop did a little tugging and twisting and now the door fits quite well. Oh the fun of it.

    Comment


    • #17
      I am now advised that the problem may lie in the rear backing plate that prevents adjustment of the rear brakes. Not a lot of luck finding replacments. I am not sure if the adjuster is part of this or not. My Chassis catalog is not too descriptive. Has anyone had this problem or had to "fix" the rear backing plate.
      The saga continues.

      One bit of good news. I hit a pothole and later discovered that the right front door clearance was nil at the fender. A good body shop did a little tugging and twisting and now the door fits quite well. Oh the fun of it.

      Comment


      • #18
        Hi N8N et al -

        I have had a low brake pedal on my 64 Cruiser with manual brakes and the stock 10" drums since I got it. It has an AMC dual-circuit master cylinder on it that the previous owner installed and which I replaced with new in kind.

        The problem is not the automatic brake adjusters as the pedal has retained the same low position for 10,000+ miles. And the pedal won't 'pump up' so there is no air in the line.

        I have wondered if there is a difference between a master cylinder intended for power brakes vs. one for manual brakes? Dunno which mine is, but it could well be intended for power brake application.

        Also, there is discussion here of residual check valves. I don't know anything about those. What do I need to know about these for my car?

        If I have to stop at the bottom of one of Seattle's really steep hils, the pedal is literally on the floor. Wouldn't want to rear end another car - it might be another Studebaker!


        Thanks for your help.

        Frank Starr
        Seattle

        Comment


        • #19
          Hi N8N et al -

          I have had a low brake pedal on my 64 Cruiser with manual brakes and the stock 10" drums since I got it. It has an AMC dual-circuit master cylinder on it that the previous owner installed and which I replaced with new in kind.

          The problem is not the automatic brake adjusters as the pedal has retained the same low position for 10,000+ miles. And the pedal won't 'pump up' so there is no air in the line.

          I have wondered if there is a difference between a master cylinder intended for power brakes vs. one for manual brakes? Dunno which mine is, but it could well be intended for power brake application.

          Also, there is discussion here of residual check valves. I don't know anything about those. What do I need to know about these for my car?

          If I have to stop at the bottom of one of Seattle's really steep hils, the pedal is literally on the floor. Wouldn't want to rear end another car - it might be another Studebaker!


          Thanks for your help.

          Frank Starr
          Seattle

          Comment


          • #20
            quote:Originally posted by mdelapp

            I am now advised that the problem may lie in the rear backing plate that prevents adjustment of the rear brakes.
            I have been futzing around adjusting the brakes on my newly installed Turner system. I now have a good pedal, but I am not sure what you mean the rears' backing plates are preventing adjustment.

            You can adjust the shoes just as you can the fronts. However, since 2005 I have always been concerned with the "parking brake" locking up. Make sure that the parking brake assembly is not preventing any adjustment in the rear. Try loosening the cable and then try adjusting the rear brakes. Can anyone spell F-I-R-E.??

            Comment


            • #21
              quote:Originally posted by mdelapp

              I am now advised that the problem may lie in the rear backing plate that prevents adjustment of the rear brakes.
              I have been futzing around adjusting the brakes on my newly installed Turner system. I now have a good pedal, but I am not sure what you mean the rears' backing plates are preventing adjustment.

              You can adjust the shoes just as you can the fronts. However, since 2005 I have always been concerned with the "parking brake" locking up. Make sure that the parking brake assembly is not preventing any adjustment in the rear. Try loosening the cable and then try adjusting the rear brakes. Can anyone spell F-I-R-E.??

              Comment


              • #22
                Well... the OP has a '53; he may still have the original brakes on the rear. Those aren't the same as the later (55-up) brakes with the star wheel adjusters. I'm not sure, but they *may* use a cam type adjuster like the earlier cars, some trucks, and cars with original front disc brakes. If that is the case, upgrading to the 10" rear drums from a 55-64 car with front drum brakes would be an easy improvement and would also get rid of the obnoxious cam adjusters if I am envisioning the issue correctly. Not sure if a new rear parking brake cable would be required or not.

                Frank, you shouldn't need a residual pressure valve in your setup, but I wonder if you don't need to adjust your pushrod length somewhat? Unfortunately I don't think there was ever an adjustable pushrod *made* for a suspended pedal car, so this may be custom work...

                nate

                --
                55 Commander Starlight
                http://members.cox.net/njnagel
                --
                55 Commander Starlight
                http://members.cox.net/njnagel

                Comment


                • #23
                  Well... the OP has a '53; he may still have the original brakes on the rear. Those aren't the same as the later (55-up) brakes with the star wheel adjusters. I'm not sure, but they *may* use a cam type adjuster like the earlier cars, some trucks, and cars with original front disc brakes. If that is the case, upgrading to the 10" rear drums from a 55-64 car with front drum brakes would be an easy improvement and would also get rid of the obnoxious cam adjusters if I am envisioning the issue correctly. Not sure if a new rear parking brake cable would be required or not.

                  Frank, you shouldn't need a residual pressure valve in your setup, but I wonder if you don't need to adjust your pushrod length somewhat? Unfortunately I don't think there was ever an adjustable pushrod *made* for a suspended pedal car, so this may be custom work...

                  nate

                  --
                  55 Commander Starlight
                  http://members.cox.net/njnagel
                  --
                  55 Commander Starlight
                  http://members.cox.net/njnagel

                  Comment


                  • #24
                    Checking a motor manual 47-54 used Lockheed self adjusting which shows a procedure for a major adjustment whenever brakes are redone. It
                    has cams for this adjustment. The cam looks to ride against a lever in the self adjustment assembly. If everything is intact you should be able to adjust the brakes with the cam. Since front drag when you shorten rod it probably lies in the rear. To repeat everyone else 2# check in front close to master cylinder if it's under floor. #10 in rear if one in master has been removed. How does pulling parking brake effect the pedal?

                    Comment


                    • #25
                      Checking a motor manual 47-54 used Lockheed self adjusting which shows a procedure for a major adjustment whenever brakes are redone. It
                      has cams for this adjustment. The cam looks to ride against a lever in the self adjustment assembly. If everything is intact you should be able to adjust the brakes with the cam. Since front drag when you shorten rod it probably lies in the rear. To repeat everyone else 2# check in front close to master cylinder if it's under floor. #10 in rear if one in master has been removed. How does pulling parking brake effect the pedal?

                      Comment


                      • #26
                        Hi N8N -

                        I've thought about shortening the pushrod, although I think there's more to it than that.

                        The brakes are fine if I apply them while the car is in Park. When I then shift into Drive, or Reverse, the pedal goes down 2-inches. This is certainly a result of the servo action of the brake shoes, but it seems excessive to me.

                        Two thoughts: 1) It seems like the automatic brake adjusters are working, but somehow set to keep a relatively large clearance at all times, resulting in excessive pedal travel. Why? (If I manually adjust the brakes up the way I like to, then the pedal is right up there, but it eventually goes back down to the low setting as I put some miles on the car.)

                        Or 2), if the master cylinder really is intended for power brakes, the brake pedal should only move far enough to operate the vacuum valve on the power cylinder, which should then do the rest of the work applying the brake shoes.

                        Bob Palma, are you reading this?

                        Comment


                        • #27
                          Hi N8N -

                          I've thought about shortening the pushrod, although I think there's more to it than that.

                          The brakes are fine if I apply them while the car is in Park. When I then shift into Drive, or Reverse, the pedal goes down 2-inches. This is certainly a result of the servo action of the brake shoes, but it seems excessive to me.

                          Two thoughts: 1) It seems like the automatic brake adjusters are working, but somehow set to keep a relatively large clearance at all times, resulting in excessive pedal travel. Why? (If I manually adjust the brakes up the way I like to, then the pedal is right up there, but it eventually goes back down to the low setting as I put some miles on the car.)

                          Or 2), if the master cylinder really is intended for power brakes, the brake pedal should only move far enough to operate the vacuum valve on the power cylinder, which should then do the rest of the work applying the brake shoes.

                          Bob Palma, are you reading this?

                          Comment


                          • #28
                            Seems like the self adjuster may not be working as it should. I don,t know how many miles your talking for it to go back down. Maybe someone
                            has the starwheels reversed side to side which would probably let them back off.

                            Comment


                            • #29
                              Seems like the self adjuster may not be working as it should. I don,t know how many miles your talking for it to go back down. Maybe someone
                              has the starwheels reversed side to side which would probably let them back off.

                              Comment

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