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Israel Studebaker plant post card

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  • Israel Studebaker plant post card

    I just won this post card on eBay. I blew up the picture, but I wish it was better.

    It looks like they were being assembled in an open hanger!





    Leonard Shepherd
    http://leonardshepherd.com/


  • #2
    I didn't know that Studebakers were built in Israel.
    Rog

    '59 Lark VI Regal Hardtop
    '59 Lark VI Regal Hardtop
    Smithtown,NY
    Recording Secretary, Long Island Studebaker Club

    Comment


    • #3
      I didn't know that Studebakers were built in Israel.
      Rog

      '59 Lark VI Regal Hardtop
      '59 Lark VI Regal Hardtop
      Smithtown,NY
      Recording Secretary, Long Island Studebaker Club

      Comment


      • #4
        Studebakers were built a lot of places, mostly from complete knock down (CKD) kits that were shipped from here and then constructed somewhere overseas.

        Ready for a trip to the beach!

        Comment


        • #5
          Studebakers were built a lot of places, mostly from complete knock down (CKD) kits that were shipped from here and then constructed somewhere overseas.

          Ready for a trip to the beach!

          Comment


          • #6
            I can't understand why they would ship unassembled cars around the world to be built, especially in Studebaker's low volume. Think of your own experience: Doesn't a car take up way more space in pieces than it does complete? They would have had to maintain assembly plants, warehouses, and employ labor. There would be redundant costs as a result. What a Hassle--maybe that inefficiency is why they were losing money.

            Comment


            • #7
              I can't understand why they would ship unassembled cars around the world to be built, especially in Studebaker's low volume. Think of your own experience: Doesn't a car take up way more space in pieces than it does complete? They would have had to maintain assembly plants, warehouses, and employ labor. There would be redundant costs as a result. What a Hassle--maybe that inefficiency is why they were losing money.

              Comment


              • #8
                quote:Originally posted by wally

                I can't understand why they would ship unassembled cars around the world to be built,
                This was probably due to high import tariffs on finished automobiles in these countries. Most countries (the US included) have gone a step further and to avoid tariffs require home country CONTENT as well as home country assembly labor.

                My September '53 issue of Studebaker News is all about the introduction of the 1953 Studebakers around the world and talks about many of these assembly locations.

                Here's the front page. The picture in the upper left shows the Studebaker assembly plant in Uitenhage, South Africa...





                How about 2,000 Studebaker trucks assembled in Uttarpara, just outside of Calcutta (a few C9 cabs for Matt!)





                Here's the first Mexican built '53 Studebakers...





                How about this Brazillian built '52 Wagon...




                Dick Steinkamp
                Bellingham, WA

                Comment


                • #9
                  quote:Originally posted by wally

                  I can't understand why they would ship unassembled cars around the world to be built,
                  This was probably due to high import tariffs on finished automobiles in these countries. Most countries (the US included) have gone a step further and to avoid tariffs require home country CONTENT as well as home country assembly labor.

                  My September '53 issue of Studebaker News is all about the introduction of the 1953 Studebakers around the world and talks about many of these assembly locations.

                  Here's the front page. The picture in the upper left shows the Studebaker assembly plant in Uitenhage, South Africa...





                  How about 2,000 Studebaker trucks assembled in Uttarpara, just outside of Calcutta (a few C9 cabs for Matt!)





                  Here's the first Mexican built '53 Studebakers...





                  How about this Brazillian built '52 Wagon...




                  Dick Steinkamp
                  Bellingham, WA

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Very interesting Dick, especially the 52 wagon! [:0]

                    I had relatives who were missionaries in Brazil. My uncle, Charles Clay wrote a book about his experiences in Brazil and one of the pictures has their Studebaker in it. Unfortunately, it was not a station wagon.




                    Leonard Shepherd
                    http://leonardshepherd.com/

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Very interesting Dick, especially the 52 wagon! [:0]

                      I had relatives who were missionaries in Brazil. My uncle, Charles Clay wrote a book about his experiences in Brazil and one of the pictures has their Studebaker in it. Unfortunately, it was not a station wagon.




                      Leonard Shepherd
                      http://leonardshepherd.com/

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        It's NOT inefficient or a hassle at all to assemble vehicles overseas. To sell a complete Studebaker in these countries would have attracted such astronomical import duties that no one would buy one because of the price.
                        Studebaker did not subsidize these plants. They were there to earn profits for their local owners. Having a car assembled there made it virtually "homegrown" and therefore no import duty (or very little). Besides providing local employment and some local industry, the completed cars could then compete with local products. The Assembly plant in Belgium (for example) was very profitable selling Studebakers and Volkswagens which they assembled.
                        These overseas plants had NOTHING to do with the reasons that Studebaker stopped producing automobiles.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          It's NOT inefficient or a hassle at all to assemble vehicles overseas. To sell a complete Studebaker in these countries would have attracted such astronomical import duties that no one would buy one because of the price.
                          Studebaker did not subsidize these plants. They were there to earn profits for their local owners. Having a car assembled there made it virtually "homegrown" and therefore no import duty (or very little). Besides providing local employment and some local industry, the completed cars could then compete with local products. The Assembly plant in Belgium (for example) was very profitable selling Studebakers and Volkswagens which they assembled.
                          These overseas plants had NOTHING to do with the reasons that Studebaker stopped producing automobiles.

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            There are a LOT of studebaker trucks in Russia. Although I didnt see them when I was there the last two times, But I have read that there were quite a few espeically military units but I was watching a Russian movie where they had a race between a russian car and Studebaker sedan. The name was very well known for a time.

                            Ches in Sioux Falls, SD
                            55 Commander Coupe hoping to be ready July 2008

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              There are a LOT of studebaker trucks in Russia. Although I didnt see them when I was there the last two times, But I have read that there were quite a few espeically military units but I was watching a Russian movie where they had a race between a russian car and Studebaker sedan. The name was very well known for a time.

                              Ches in Sioux Falls, SD
                              55 Commander Coupe hoping to be ready July 2008

                              Comment

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