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  • "We grow too soon old, and too late smart."

    There's more! Not being as familiar with the 4-Jet as with the WCFB and the AFB, both of which I have rebuilt (many times), because of some hesitation when starting from cold, and stopping as if not getting enough gas, I decided to take the air horn (bowl cover) off the 4-Jet, but neglected to remove the one bolt inside the air horn. Thinking someone had previously sealed the gasket with Permatex, I spent a long time prying the cover off, only to break one of the tabs extending into the bowl. Oh shuck, I thought, actually something more odiferous! Went down to O'Reilly's and bought some "JB Weld", strongest strength, and repaired my error. I will let it "cure" for several days, and hopefully seal (no supercharger here) and hopefully, the "weld" will not be dissolved by gas or ethanol after I re-assemble it with a new accelerator pump, gasket, and pump boot. I thought there was no reason to mess with the float settings or jets, since it ran fine otherwise---except as mentioned. It would even stall after warmed up if I used a heavy foot on the accelerator, thinking that this was not a choke problem, but one of a worn accelerator pump. I have attached a photo of the repair so far.

    Maybe someone can tell me why the photo I uploaded from my wife's Mini IPad is
    always uploaded inverted. I tried reverting it in using her IPad, downloaded it to my laptop, rotated it 180 degrees in the laptop, saved it, and uploaded the image again, but it was always inverted when it appeared in the forum download manager and as above. Suggestion: Turn your laptop upside down to see image 2, or stand on your head on your chair if you are looking at a desktop monitor.I guess I have too much time on my hands editing these posts But look what happens when I start working on the cars!

    Attached Files
    Last edited by jnfweber; 12-19-2013, 02:12 PM.
    sigpic
    Jack, in Montana

  • #2
    Good old JB Weld! People laugh when they hear about the things that I have used it for, but it is amazing stuff.

    A little JB Weld, with fiberglass strands mixed in, has sealed the back of a leaky Holley intake manifold on a big block Chevy for many years now. No leaks.

    More recently, I used it to seal a crack in an intake manifold. With a bit of careful sanding and repainting, it looks as good as new, and it does not leak.

    It's also good for fixing dinged up boat props. Just fill in the gaps, sand/file it smooth, and then repaint. It stands up to the force of the prop rotating at high speed in the water without falling out.

    Just the other day, I used JB Weld to rebuild a cracked steering wheel. Not only does it glue together the separated pieces but it also fills in the gaps. For that job, it works far better than other fillers, IMO.

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    • #3
      Originally posted by northern View Post
      Good old JB Weld! People laugh when they hear about the things that I have used it for, but it is amazing stuff.

      A little JB Weld, with fiberglass strands mixed in, has sealed the back of a leaky Holley intake manifold on a big block Chevy for many years now. No leaks.

      More recently, I used it to seal a crack in an intake manifold. With a bit of careful sanding and repainting, it looks as good as new, and it does not leak.

      It's also good for fixing dinged up boat props. Just fill in the gaps, sand/file it smooth, and then repaint. It stands up to the force of the prop rotating at high speed in the water without falling out.

      Just the other day, I used JB Weld to rebuild a cracked steering wheel. Not only does it glue together the separated pieces but it also fills in the gaps. For that job, it works far better than other fillers, IMO.
      Ha, ha! I get a kick out of your reply, especially since you are a "northerner" up in sunny Sask. I have made my home [still do] in Montana, and once trailered a 1926 Studebaker Light Six to Great Falls from Plentywood. We "northerners" besides being hardy survivors, are also ingenious. Between duct tape, silicon sealer, Crazy Glue, and JB Weld, we have fixed a lot of things. What most comes to mind is my 30 year fix of the leaking pivot on the fuel pump of my avatar Sky Hawk. Also being "thrifty". though not a Scot, as many in Western Canada are, and being relatively isolated in Montana, I have done a lot of these cheap and quick fixes. Nice to hear from you!
      sigpic
      Jack, in Montana

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      • #4
        Jack, Montana is a great place. Last summer, while on a hiking trip in the Red Lodge area of southern Montana, we found a 1954 light blue Starliner. I tried to buy it, but the owner would not sell; he had plans to restore it himself. It had sat outside for most of its life and needed almost everything. But it still had nice lines.

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        • #5
          Well, then there's the story of the guy on a snowmobile miles from home with a hole in a piston ( 2 stroker). He had a can of soup, so removed the lid, took off the head and put the soup can lid on top of the piston and put the head back on. Just enough compression to make it home...so I was told.
          Dave Warren (Perry Mason by day, Perry Como by night)

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          • #6
            OH Good Grief!....Speaking of smart...I turned my computer upside down to view your picture and all my pixels fell out all over the floor!

            What a mess!
            John Clary
            Greer, SC

            SDC member since 1975

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