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Classy Pre-War Stude!

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  • Classy Pre-War Stude!

    One of Studebakers better pre-war models is for sale on e-bay now. It's a 1931 Commander 'Model 70' six-wheeler regal sedan. The junior models come up for auction quite often, but the Commanders and Presidents..not as much. The seller states that he bought the car to build a street rod.....but realized it was a much too solid, original, and complete vehicle to do that to.....(A wise man!!) A good friend of mine, Dave Dow from Vermont, owns the twin to this '31 Commander in two-tone green. (Check out the rare, original hood ornament on the e-bay car.)

  • #2
    Link?

    You talking about this Ebay ad?

    http://tinyurl.com/1931-Studebaker-Commander


    HTIH (Hope The Info Helps)

    Jeff


    Get your facts first, and then you can distort them as much as you please. Mark Twain



    Note: SDC# 070190 (and earlier...)

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    • #3
      Why no,.....I'm talking about one of the OTHER 1931 Studebaker Commander Model 70 Regal Sedan's which are on e-bay right now!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

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      • #4
        That's really nice...I like the dual spare tires. What happens to the value of these original cars when a frame-off restoration takes place?

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        • #5
          Originally posted by SN-60 View Post
          Why no,.....I'm talking about one of the OTHER 1931 Studebaker Commander Model 70 Regal Sedan's which are on e-bay right now!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

          Well, supply the good people here with a workable link, then!!!!!
          HTIH (Hope The Info Helps)

          Jeff


          Get your facts first, and then you can distort them as much as you please. Mark Twain



          Note: SDC# 070190 (and earlier...)

          Comment


          • #6
            Originally posted by DEEPNHOCK View Post

            Well, supply the good people here with a workable link, then!!!!!
            OK Deep,.....I guess I'll have to do ALL the work around here!! (Nice '31 huh?)

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            • #7
              Old timers used to say that the Commanders of this era were easier cars to own and drive than the big Presidents. The Commanders had almost exactly the same look as the President series, just scaled down a bit, and had a lot less 'mass' to deal with in everyday use.

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              • #8
                Originally posted by bosshoss61 View Post
                That's really nice...I like the dual spare tires. What happens to the value of these original cars when a frame-off restoration takes place?
                A $25-$30K restoration will turn a $10K car into an $18K-$22K car....

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by 63 R2 Hawk View Post
                  A $25-$30K restoration will turn a $10K car into an $18K-$22K car....
                  You're probably right about the monetary value, and the folks that really understand these cars become fewer every day,....but Studebakers of this era were truly the 'High Water Marks' for the Company.

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                  • #10
                    It is my humble opinion that, it was this era, that began to produce cars that were better and more capable of performance far beyond the quality of the roads upon which they had to travel. Wonder how many of them would have survived if they hadn't been shaken apart, banged around, and repeatedly mired to the axles on deep rut muddy dirt roads. Think about the era. Paved roads were the exception. Most bridges were wooden loose plank, and often one lane where cars had to traverse one at a time to cross. In many parts of the country, cars often had to cross streams in shallow places with no bridge at all.

                    I guess it's like the old "chicken or egg?" question...was it better roads that caused the development of better cars, or better cars that demanded better roads? To me...it's the cars of the 1930's that are the most fascinating. I would love to have custody of at least one before I part this life. However, if I never achieve that goal, I'll take comfort by keeping in mind that some of my fulfilled dreams were not as rewarding as the responsibilities that came with the "reality."
                    John Clary
                    Greer, SC

                    SDC member since 1975

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Originally posted by jclary View Post
                      It is my humble opinion that, it was this era, that began to produce cars that were better and more capable of performance far beyond the quality of the roads upon which they had to travel. Wonder how many of them would have survived if they hadn't been shaken apart, banged around, and repeatedly mired to the axles on deep rut muddy dirt roads. Think about the era. Paved roads were the exception. Most bridges were wooden loose plank, and often one lane where cars had to traverse one at a time to cross. In many parts of the country, cars often had to cross streams in shallow places with no bridge at all.

                      I guess it's like the old "chicken or egg?" question...was it better roads that caused the development of better cars, or better cars that demanded better roads? To me...it's the cars of the 1930's that are the most fascinating. I would love to have custody of at least one before I part this life. However, if I never achieve that goal, I'll take comfort by keeping in mind that some of my fulfilled dreams were not as rewarding as the responsibilities that came with the "reality."
                      VERY well said John.

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                      • #12
                        Originally posted by jclary View Post
                        It is my humble opinion that, it was this era, that began to produce cars that were better and more capable of performance far beyond the quality of the roads upon which they had to travel.
                        Isn't that still the truth today? Show me where one can drive some of these expensive European cars at speeds of 155 mph here in North America. And I wouldn't be at all surprised if these same cars would have premature suspension failure if they were regularly driven over gravel roads and some of roads of the bigger cities that are suffering from crumbling infrastructure.

                        Craig

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                        • #13
                          Originally posted by 8E45E View Post
                          .... the bigger cities that are suffering from crumbling infrastructure.

                          Craig
                          Well...your word is the key difference. It is the shame of our era. We are presiding over allowing what our forefathers were BUILDING...to fall into regression and ruin. Physically and morally.
                          John Clary
                          Greer, SC

                          SDC member since 1975

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                          • #14
                            I'll bet that the FREEWHEELING feature found in this '31 Commander was the cause of more than one change of underwear for drivers of this car over the years! (Especially if the 'Rod Brakes' were out of adjustment) Freewheeling though, was one more necessary step on the way to a true 'automatic overdrive' option.

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                            • #15
                              I see it says "Rock City" on the trunk. We visited there in 2001 and saw several vintage cars "posed" around the grounds, including a 47-49 Stude I posed for a picture with.
                              KURTRUK
                              (read it backwards)




                              Nothing is politically right which is morally wrong. -A. Lincoln

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