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You thought your LAST restoration was a challenge...

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  • #16
    I guess blue was a two-tone color. Academy Blue and Arctic White. I like it...
    Tom - Bradenton, FL

    1964 Studebaker Daytona - 289 4V, 4-Speed (Cost To Date: $2514.10)
    1964 Studebaker Commander - 170 1V, 3-Speed w/OD

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    • #17
      Originally posted by Chris_Dresbach View Post
      Must have ran when parked...
      As bad as that looks, I've seen worse. Much worse. It might made a good parts car though, but that engine is probably stuck.
      "Parts car"???? That car is very restore-able, and is one the rarest of the rare, a 57 GH. It needs to be saved. I am sure someone will step up to the plate.

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      • #18
        I've seen worse. Once a guy gave me a '59 ElCamino-when I picked it up with the wrecker,it broke in half.[and those had some heavy frames!]
        Oglesby,Il.

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        • #19
          At least he doesn't have a $25,000 reserve on it.
          Jon Stalnaker
          Karel Staple Chapter SDC

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          • #20
            I think it has a good battery hold down!

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            • #21
              That's good point about the K-hardware. All the instruments appear to be there also. Looking for a silver lining...
              Andy
              62 GT

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              • #22
                Originally posted by JimC View Post
                Good grief guys! Someone posts a car here, and all anyone ever does is pick it to pieces! Seriously!

                (Admittedly, it's easier to pick a car apart when it's mostly fallen apart on its own )

                On a more serious note, it's sad to see one in this shape. I can almost see what happened. The Supercharger went out in the early 60's, so the owner parked it, popped the hood, and pulled the supercharger to fix. It was going to be a quick fix, so he just left the hood up. Then he got a promotion at work. Then hid kids had baseball games. Then he just found better things to do. Every day he'd see the thing sitting at the back of the property, hood open, and remind himself that he'd eventually get around to it.

                In the late 60's, someone knocked on his door, told him he had a great looking Golden Hawk, and made a decent offer. The guy said no; it just needed the supercharger rebuilt, and he's going to do that this weekend. In the 70's, someone else pointed out that he had a pretty rare car, and it wouldn't be too hard to bring it back. "No," he said, refusing the offer, "I'm going to get to that soon."

                And so it went, In the 80's someone still offered him money in hopes it could be restored. Then, in the 90's, the guy got his first offer to buy it as a "parts car". He was furious. This is no parts car. Sure, the front end was starting to shift, but it's restorable. He clung to the car more than before, because nobody else could appreciate it.

                Finally, he died. In the estate sale, some young guy bought it. Assuming a lot of things, he hooked a chain to the front end to pull it out. As the last threads of metal in a mostly rust frame failed, the car split, leaving the wheelbase several inches longer than original in the process. With nowhere else to go, he logged onto ebay, and there it is today.

                The moral of the story: No, you won't get around to it, so let someone else have that Studebaker. (Ideally me! )
                Very well said! If we truly want to preserve the Studebaker marque, those of us with projects that we plan to get to "someday" need to do a reality check and let them go before they get anywhere close to this state. Or before our heirs have to deal with them. They are not getting more valuable if they are left to deteriorate.
                Pat Dilling
                Olivehurst, CA
                Custom '53 Starlight aka STU COOL


                LS1 Engine Swap Journal: http://www.hotrodders.com/forum/jour...ournalid=33611

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                • #23
                  Hmmm. I think we can just call this "typical" Michigan rust.
                  I just helped dad replace an oil pan on his 78 chevy truck. 3rd oil pan so far.
                  Around here oil pans rust through, which is funny to me. The best thing you can do for a daily driver is have a leaky transmission. We call that undercoating.

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                  • #24
                    If it interests him Chris Dresbach would not even blink an eye at that!

                    Dean.

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                    • #25
                      When the owner states "barn find", he means that the car is literally a barn that he found! Not sure what kind of livestock was raised in it, but I have heard of automobiles being used as chicken coupes. This could never have been a chicken coupe though, but it could have been a chicken hard top I suppose.
                      sigpic
                      In the middle of MinneSTUDEa.

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                      • #26
                        Originally posted by dean pearson View Post
                        If it interests him Chris Dresbach would not even blink an eye at that!

                        Dean.
                        True, but that's too common of a rare car for me. The '53 I have is 1-of-1 built and the bones of a Model N also in my collection are 1-of-5. As for the rust, you know, I like a good ol' challenge.
                        Chris Dresbach

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                        • #27
                          Originally posted by Milaca View Post
                          When the owner states "barn find", he means that the car is literally a barn that he found! Not sure what kind of livestock was raised in it, but I have heard of automobiles being used as chicken coupes. This could never have been a chicken coupe though, but it could have been a chicken hard top I suppose.
                          I think it was more a 'grow-op' for vegitation than it was for livestock.

                          Craig

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                          • #28
                            The owner is a master of understatement, to wit, these statements from his ad:

                            1. "The whole interior is rather weathered"

                            2. "The frame (is) weak."

                            3. "The engine is probably (you're not sure?) locked up from setting."

                            This guy is a REAL salesman!
                            Attached Files
                            Last edited by Lothar; 08-30-2013, 05:48 AM. Reason: (Add parenthetical comment)
                            John
                            1950 Champion
                            W-3 4 Dr. Sedan
                            Holdrege NE

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