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It's alive and still racing: 1932 Indy car #46 [Now with video link!!!]

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  • rockne10
    replied
    Originally posted by SN-60 View Post
    That's very interesting Gary! So in the brake department, Valpey's #37 is probably the most original of all the factory team cars?
    Stan Smith, Sr and Stan Smith, Jr restored the #37 back in the late '70's early '80's. Their goal at the time was to do a perfect restoration as it appeared in 1931. Remember, #37 was the 1931 prototype produced by Studebaker engineers without corporate auspices. The company got on board after #37 was showing well when it went over the wall at Indy and later won the Pikes Peak Hill Climb. Corporate authorized four more cars to make an Indy team for 1932. Valpey's car is truly "ONE OF A KIND"!

    Here's its restored debut in Boalsburg, PA, 1981.







    Last edited by rockne10; 09-01-2013, 09:01 PM.

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  • 57pack
    replied
    Thanks again Gary! Love that era race cars! Amazing thing is less than three miles from me there was a huge wooden plank oval race track. The track was called Amatol raceway,as the locals called it , built on the site of a WW1 munitions plant also called Amatol.
    Operated from 1926 to about 1933 or so. Studebaker was a major player there and maintained a factory shop there behind Burdicks Bus Stop, ( still there) still can see the pits.
    Studebaker used this track for testing and endurance evaluations after racing ceased.
    Last edited by 57pack; 09-01-2013, 06:36 PM.

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  • MarioD
    replied
    Originally posted by garyash View Post
    [ATTACH=CONFIG]26872[/ATTACH]

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  • t walgamuth
    replied
    Very cool!

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  • SN-60
    replied
    Gary,.....Sounds like the race to completion is on!

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  • MarioD
    replied
    Originally posted by Skybolt View Post
    Interesting. I saw a video a few months ago about a Studebaker Indy race car in Germany that was a replica and they said it cost about $1M. I'm not sure if it was this car and they were saying that it would cost that much to replicate or that it was a replica. I have been trying to find the video again but so far no luck. It was two guys out the back of a workshop and they took it for a test drive. At the time I had just come back from the Studebaker museum and was looking for as much info on the Indy cars. Len.
    Attached Files

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  • Guest's Avatar
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    Interesting. I saw a video a few months ago about a Studebaker Indy race car in Germany that was a replica and they said it cost about $1M. I'm not sure if it was this car and they were saying that it would cost that much to replicate or that it was a replica. I have been trying to find the video again but so far no luck. It was two guys out the back of a workshop and they took it for a test drive. At the time I had just come back from the Studebaker museum and was looking for as much info on the Indy cars. Len.

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  • SN-60
    replied
    That's very interesting Gary! So in the brake department, Valpey's #37 is probably the most original of all the factory team cars?

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  • garyash
    replied
    Ed, the Indy cars originally used the 12" cable-operated brakes from the 1929-31 Dictators with stamped-steel drums. That provide enough stopping power to get the cars off the trailers, but during Indy racing they were only used for pit stops. Since the Studebaker cars now get run at Laguna Seca, Mt. Washington hill climb, Lime Rock, Milwaukee Mile, etc., they needed better brakes because the steel drums change shape when hot, so #18, #37, and #34 now use cast iron Buick drums from 1960's cars like Rivieras. While Valpey's #37 car still has the cable-operated mechanisms, the others have hydraulic brakes. I don't know about #22 in the Indy Museum. Because of the narrower shoes which are used in these cars to fit the backing plates, the Buick drums have been turned down to remove the outer edges. It looks like #46 also got this drum treatment, and probably hydraulic brakes, as well. There are both 45-fin and 90-fin versions of the iron drums around.

    I'm using '63 Riviera backing plates in front and '60 LeSabre backing plates in the rear plus newly designed hubs to allow the use of full-width, 90-fin, Buick aluminum drums with the knock-off, wire-spoke 18" wheels.

    Here are the brakes on #37 and my aluminum drums (on the rear axle).

    Click image for larger version

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  • SN-60
    replied
    Great videos Gary!....Thanks. Do You think that the brakes on #46 have been updated? I think they look different from what I remember seeing on #37.

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  • garyash
    replied
    https://plus.google.com/117496407846...05440935/posts

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  • SN-60
    replied
    Didn't realize the Indy Museum's restoration facility restored the black #46 car. I believe that they also restored (and the Museum still owns) the red #22 car.

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  • 57pack
    replied
    Great news Gary!
    How's your Indy race car coming along?
    Would be a nice comparison with pictures of #46 and your car!

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  • Chris_Dresbach
    replied
    Glad to see that the car still exists. Looks to be in good condition, but it looks like part of the 46 may have gotten rubbed off. If the car ends up for sale again, there ya go Gary...

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  • SN-60
    replied
    Sure like to see it sold back to someone over here though. Wonder if Bob Valpey has room for another car??

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