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Packard V8 clutch housing?...How many do You need?

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  • #76
    I just did a quick Google and found this from a thread here on this Forum.
    I even made an entry ? ( what a memory ) . This isn't mine , but a copy n paste of a guy doing them .


    Send me a CLEAN, GUTTED TH400.
    I'll send you converted transmission & kit.
    Make up your own transmission with shift kit as desired.
    Make up fill tube & dipstick according to your desired final location.
    Make your own drive shaft (1 piece only.)
    Install, enjoy the difference with confidence. No puking overflow, more power to the wheels, no sticking in Park on hills.
    Uses original Packard flywheel only. (No added adaptor [spool] plus 2nd flex plate which may wobble, vibrate, and/or break.)
    If you are interested and need more information, contact:
    JACK NORDSTROM
    4975 IH-35 SOUTH
    NEW BRAUNFELS TEXAS 78132

    I just put my 2 cents worth in for the heck of it. I will never do a conversion , and so that is it for me
    on this subject .
    Thanks .
    Bill H
    Daytona Beach
    SDC member since 1970
    Owner of The Skeeter Hawk .

    Comment


    • #77
      Not really any new news here. There are two approaches to using any of the various GM TH350, TH400, TH700R4, TH4L85E, et al automatic transmissions behind a Packard V8 and they've been used for more than twenty years.

      1. An extended spool spaces the GM torque converter and flexplate the appropriate distance behind the Packard flexplate. An adapter plate with the two bolt patterns mates the Packard block to the TH. This works fine if the combination isn't driven hard. For racing and 7,000 RPM shifts, it would probably fail in short order.

      2. In the Jack Nordstrom example, the TH integral bell is machined shorter and an adapter plate is welded to the remaining material. Then, the TH flexplate and torque converter can be bolted directly to the Packard crankshaft in the conventional manner. This is stronger and more durable. It's also shorter.

      jack vines
      PackardV8

      Comment


      • #78
        Originally posted by PackardV8 View Post
        Not really any new news here. There are two approaches to using any of the various GM TH350, TH400, TH700R4, TH4L85E, et al automatic transmissions behind a Packard V8 and they've been used for more than twenty years.

        1. An extended spool spaces the GM torque converter and flexplate the appropriate distance behind the Packard flexplate. An adapter plate with the two bolt patterns mates the Packard block to the TH. This works fine if the combination isn't driven hard. For racing and 7,000 RPM shifts, it would probably fail in short order.

        2. In the Jack Nordstrom example, the TH integral bell is machined shorter and an adapter plate is welded to the remaining material. Then, the TH flexplate and torque converter can be bolted directly to the Packard crankshaft in the conventional manner. This is stronger and more durable. It's also shorter.

        jack vines
        Your example #2 sounds great....are there any negatives at all?

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        • #79
          Originally posted by SN-60 View Post
          Your example #2 sounds great....are there any negatives at all?
          Only the cost and that the transmission has to be disassembled and that the machinist has to be really good. When the front of the bell with the bolt circle is cut off, there's no center left. Thus, a jig has to be made up to hold the transmission centered on the adapter so it can be welded on center. Then, the TH bell is thin and tends to move around as it is welded. Once the welding is complete, the tranny has to be reassembled and checked on another jig to insure the shaft still runs perpendicular to the face all the way around the large circumference. Should there be any runout, it has to be disassembled and milled back square.

          Also, the TH are open on the bottom and the cover will no longer fit, so it has to be shortened and made to mate to the Packard bell.

          jack vines
          PackardV8

          Comment


          • #80
            I defer to Your knowledge of pickup trucks, heavy trucks, and busses. I always thought the greater weight of the larger vehicles, along with the heavy loads that they were built to carry, would necessitate heavier components.....Silly Me!


            Knock yourself out, but if I don't know the answer, I pass it along to somebody much more knowledgeable, which is how I think how this works. In the meantime, compared to other manufacturers, Studebakers commercial vehicles were usually smaller than say, the manufacturer of these brutes:


            Those purpose built vehicles were built with some real purpose built components, so everything was bigger. Your definition and my definition of bigger, beefier, and heavier vary by a mile here, because if you want big and heavy for a commercial vehicle, that's BIG and HEAVY !! There's no gas V8's or anything of that sort in these vehicles, that's a full on diesel, which calls for things like air brakes, 6, 10, 18 speeds and etc, and in general, enough power and torque to move entire mountains. In the grand scheme of things, Studebaker's commercial vehicles were usually converted truck frames, until you started getting up into the diesel truck arena.
            1964 Studebaker Commander R2 clone
            1963 Studebaker Daytona Hardtop with no engine or transmission
            1950 Studebaker 2R5 w/170 six cylinder and 3spd OD
            1955 Studebaker Commander Hardtop w/289 and 3spd OD and Megasquirt port fuel injection(among other things)

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            • #81
              I suppose there are many owners of 1956 Golden Hawks that do not want to alter a 'factory original' Twin-Ultramatic car whether they are having problems with the transmission or not....and I understand that attitude. Especially if the car is really only brought out for auto shows and the occasional Sunday drive.

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              • #82
                Jack, I wondered if the Ultramatic converter housings arrived? That AMC T-10/ custom adapter plate/ Ultramatic converter housing project sounded interesting!

                Comment


                • #83
                  Originally posted by SN-60 View Post
                  Jack, I wondered if the Ultramatic converter housings arrived? That AMC T-10/ custom adapter plate/ Ultramatic converter housing project sounded interesting!
                  That particular project is only in the theoretically possible category. I'll certainly never get around to it, because the Ford pattern T10s and top loader 4-speeds can be used on the standard shift Packard V8 bell housing with much less work and expense.

                  Should your theoretical '56J Twin-Ultramatic owner becalmed with a dead tranny want to try the conversion, I'd sell the AMC T10 for $300 plus shipping.

                  In fact, if a Stude V8 owner knows a machinist who would shorten the input shaft and make a pilot bearing adapter, it would bolt up to the '57-64 3-speed bellhousing and could be used in a performance Stude V8 build. Anything will fit anything; just time, money and talent.

                  I'll be investigating using the T-U aluminum bell for truck 5-speed and 6-speed trannies which have an input shaft too long for the standard shift bell.

                  jack vines
                  Last edited by PackardV8; 09-01-2013, 10:34 AM.
                  PackardV8

                  Comment


                  • #84
                    Originally posted by PackardV8 View Post
                    That particular project is only in the theoretically possible category. I'll certainly never get around to it, because the Ford pattern T10s and top loader 4-speeds can be used on the standard shift Packard V8 bell housing with much less work and expense.

                    Should your theoretical '56J Twin-Ultramatic owner becalmed with a dead tranny want to try the conversion, I'd sell the AMC T10 for $300 plus shipping.

                    In fact, if a Stude V8 owner knows a machinist who would shorten the input shaft and make a pilot bearing adapter, it would bolt up to the '57-64 3-speed bellhousing and could be used in a performance Stude V8 build. Anything will fit anything; just time, money and talent.

                    I'll be investigating using the T-U aluminum bell for truck 5-speed and 6-speed trannies which have an input shaft too long for the standard shift bell.

                    jack vines
                    OK Jack, Thanks...and good luck with that!

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