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  • #31
    Originally posted by GThawkwind View Post
    Well that's a whole lot better. It's a prototype for what may be the most iconic Studebaker ever, so it deserves the best it can get. It may look too far gone but I've seen less important cars in worse shape get restored so it can be done. It'll probably never be as it was again but with a 52 and a 53 parts car I think you can save her, not like you don't have time.
    You ever find any factory photos of that thing when it was alive?
    I've scoured the Studebaker Museum Archives, I've searched the internet, I've even talked to retired Studebaker engineers. The general agreement is that yes my car is indeed a 1953 Studebaker prototype but all records of it being built are lost to history. You have to remember that when Studebaker shut down the plant in 1964 they destroyed all of the engineering archives which would have had photos of my '53, the N, and my Turtle. Unfortunately the museum archives does not have all of the engineering archives so those photos no longer exist is what I have gathered. However, the Museum will back me up on the "It's a prototype" statement. The oldest photo I have of it is from 1969 on the day it was recovered from the Graveyard.
    Chris Dresbach

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    • #32
      Originally posted by Deaf Mute View Post
      We need to start a "restoration fund" for Chris and his many stolen... AHEM... salvaged items from the graveyard! Is grave robbing legal in Indiana?
      I'm open to anything, I'm well aware that the '53 will cost a fortune over time. Ever paycheck I cash I throw a little in a drawer each week. Some folks do that to save up for marriage, I do it to restore a car...
      Call it waking the dead... When my prototype is road worthy again should I call it a zombie car?
      Chris Dresbach

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      • #33
        Originally posted by Chris_Dresbach View Post
        I've scoured the Studebaker Museum Archives, I've searched the internet, I've even talked to retired Studebaker engineers. The general agreement is that yes my car is indeed a 1953 Studebaker prototype but all records of it being built are lost to history. You have to remember that when Studebaker shut down the plant in 1964 they destroyed all of the engineering archives which would have had photos of my '53, the N, and my Turtle. Unfortunately the museum archives does not have all of the engineering archives so those photos no longer exist is what I have gathered. However, the Museum will back me up on the "It's a prototype" statement. The oldest photo I have of it is from 1969 on the day it was recovered from the Graveyard.
        Can I see this pic at least? I do the same thing with my checks, try to dip into my car fund as little as possible.

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        • #34
          Originally posted by GThawkwind View Post
          Can I see this pic at least? I do the same thing with my checks, try to dip into my car fund as little as possible.


          These two photos were actually the "cover shots" for a 1970 issue of "Special Interest Autos"
          Chris Dresbach

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          • #35
            Any clue what the front end is supossed to look like?

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            • #36
              Originally posted by GThawkwind View Post
              Any clue what the front end is supossed to look like?
              The front end looks like this, it was recovered also:
              Paul
              Winston-Salem, NC
              Visit The Studebaker Skytop Registry website at: www.studebakerskytop.com

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              • #37
                Originally posted by r1lark View Post
                The front end looks like this, it was recovered also:
                Well that much is obvious. I meant what did it look like when it was together and new. There is no grill asembly or bumper, did it look like a 53, did it have a bullet nose, that sort of thing.

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                • #38
                  I spent a lot of time studying the car and built this precision model, so something like this:
                  Chris Dresbach

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                  • #39

                    Here is a photo that compares the prototype front end treatment to a '51 front end. The real prototype and the model were built from 1951 bodies.
                    Chris Dresbach

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                    • #40
                      Originally posted by Lark1959 View Post
                      I found a picture of the sand car. That one dhouldnt have been scrapped.
                      I agree it Should not have been scrapped. Sad but true that it was not worth pulling out. Initial reconnaissance made it seem to be salvageable, when I was working with the Proving ground to recover it. Im just going to start with the fenders, and find a 50 to build the 'Resurrection' with.
                      Chris, You must have half of the graveyard at your place. I was actually looking once at buying the 53 you have now, but eventually passed to concentrate on the Sand Car project (such as it is). I am working on locating a survivor mostly (you probably saw the thread here: http://forum.studebakerdriversclub.c...O-publications
                      I could have sworn that that had the 53 when I was looking at it had it on a chassis. He did have its one off prototype cast grill bar, and pard of a lower valance that was mostly rust, I suppose you have those stashed away?
                      I gotta know, did you ever hook up with the proving grounds folks to recover the main hulk of the Model N?
                      55 Commander Regal Coupe
                      XA Bat (The Roadwarrior)
                      KARR (Knightrider)
                      Eleanor (ORIGINAL Gone in 60 Seconds)


                      Mad Max Car\'s \"Hero Car Ranch\"; Seattle, Wa.

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                      • #41
                        Originally posted by PlainBrownR2 View Post


                        Well it's not as though Studebaker built these cars from dirt and snowcones! Having em outdoors won't kill them, I think that's where Studebaker thought most people were going to use them when they constructed the vehicles, as long as the parts aren't buried in the ground someplace! Besides, much like my projects, somewhere along the way I'm presuming a welder is going to be used to replace the old metal with new metal, so the projects will get moved around!
                        Even in the sunny desert a car can discentegrate..

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                        • #42
                          Well we all know that Chuck Naugle collected those cars in Arizona from almost every State in the U.S. and this '63 Studebaker Standard or H.D. Sedan either came from a rust prone area or a Southwest Riverbed!
                          StudeRich
                          Second Generation Stude Driver,
                          Proud '54 Starliner Owner

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                          • #43
                            Just so everybody's on the same page, regarding my Daytona, I was referring to the issue that we don't have a whole lot of indoor space, so I put all of the important stuff inside the car, and I work on it outdoors. Our show vehicles stay out of the weather, but since mine aren't show vehicles, a little rain and snow's not gonna kill them. Salt will do that, that is if it's in use over the winter like my Commander was, but as Studebaker built them for the outdoors, keeping my projects outdoors doesn't bother me any. This is also the one that's going to get the Ebay floor panels, possibly later on this year.

                            As an aside, we in the Midwest LOVE West Coast or Southwest sheetmetal. The dry environment does alot of good for them out there!
                            1964 Studebaker Commander R2 clone
                            1963 Studebaker Daytona Hardtop with no engine or transmission
                            1950 Studebaker 2R5 w/170 six cylinder and 3spd OD
                            1955 Studebaker Commander Hardtop w/289 and 3spd OD and Megasquirt port fuel injection(among other things)

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                            • #44
                              Originally posted by StudeRich View Post
                              Well we all know that Chuck Naugle collected those cars in Arizona from almost every State in the U.S. and this '63 Studebaker Standard or H.D. Sedan either came from a rust prone area or a Southwest Riverbed!
                              That car was an AZ car. Trying to find the build sheet I sent away for it.

                              The issue was that tree in the background. The leaves mixed with rain water makes a very acidic mixture.. That is not salt rust...

                              Many of his cars have gone to the ground because of it. That and rodent nesting and droppings..

                              Have you ever seen a salt car rust the cowl like this?

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