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Anyway around the cost of rubber?

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  • #16
    You get what you pay for...
    Tom - Bradenton, FL

    1964 Studebaker Daytona - 289 4V, 4-Speed (Cost To Date: $2514.10)
    1964 Studebaker Commander - 170 1V, 3-Speed w/OD

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    • #17
      Jim
      I didn't think red green made it that far south being originally from MN I can relate to the guy
      Mark Riesch
      New Bern, NC

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      • #18
        Originally posted by GThawkwind View Post
        Mostly what I worry about is putting the fenders back on for now, Joe you said old inner tube works? What exactly do you mean? I bet I'll have a lot better idea on making my own body rubber once I get a body and chassis manual.
        An old inner tube, or most any other piece of rubber, or even large flat washers will do. They serve more as shims than seals anyway, and are used to adjust the space between forward edge of the door & front fender, and rear edge of door & rear fender. When you get a chassis manual, you will see what I am talking about.

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        • #19
          If you're going to be a CASO, just buy a large tube of crazy glue...
          Tom - Bradenton, FL

          1964 Studebaker Daytona - 289 4V, 4-Speed (Cost To Date: $2514.10)
          1964 Studebaker Commander - 170 1V, 3-Speed w/OD

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          • #20
            Originally posted by Swifster View Post
            If you're going to be a CASO, just buy a large tube of crazy glue...
            The OP is on a limited budget, and is looking for ways to save on rubber components. For the above fender shims/seals, even on a creeper with a flashlight, most folks could not tell the difference, and the car will perform all intended functions equally well, with either repro or fabricated. Sooo what is your point?

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            • #21
              I figured there was a gasket or seal where the rear fender mounts to the the body even if there was one it could probably be made out of gasket material with relative ease. I need to get a body manual and just go from there, I bet I'll end up needing top order the important stuff. windshield,backlight,quarter windows, door seals, that type of stuff, wonder how much that'll cost.

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              • #22
                I fully support the idea of improvising, and using creative alternative solutions to expensive components. However, just because something will work "for the moment" does not mean it is a good idea. Heck, you could probably use peanut butter for body filler. It is pliable, and it smells and tastes better.

                There are certain body insulators where scrap rubber, such as cut up tires and inner-tube rubber, can be used. Especially, in areas "out of sight," I see no harm in substituting materials. However, some thought, a bit of research, and common sense needs to be applied. For example, innertube rubber is very flexible, soft, and easy to cut. Exposed to sunlight...it is quick to deteriorate with very little UV resistance. It also is quick to succumb to attack by atmospheric ozone. Additionally, it is quick to break down under attack from certain chemicals. Rubber formulation covers many volumes of scientific data. I have used old tires, conveyor belts, printer blankets, etc. for various purposes for which they were not intended with varying degrees of success.

                You need to pick and choose your battles, so to speak, when choosing the right circumstances to applying the CASO solutions. I try to invest my CASO efforts in a way that allows me to apply the money saved to purchase the "Good Stuff" for solutions I'm pretty sure I'd mess up doing myself.
                John Clary
                Greer, SC

                SDC member since 1975

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                • #23
                  First Stude , in a basket, and looking to skimp on rubber? Would you buy a car from GTHawkwind?........ Never.
                  Dave Warren (Perry Mason by day, Perry Como by night)

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                  • #24
                    Originally posted by warrlaw1 View Post
                    First Stude , in a basket, and looking to skimp on rubber? Would you buy a car from GTHawkwind?........ Never.
                    No worry Dave I don't plan selling if I get it back together.

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                    • #25
                      Before you even think of rubbers, try a pre-assembly of your front end sheet metal. That'll take your mind off the ridiculous and back to a semblance of reality.
                      Dave Warren (Perry Mason by day, Perry Como by night)

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                      • #26
                        I think I have a set of those rear fender gaskets layin' around here. I'll take a look.
                        No deceptive flags to prove I'm patriotic - no biblical BS to impress - just ME and Studebakers - as it should be.

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                        • #27
                          Perhaps the high cost has something to do with the quality of the rubber and the low volume of sales. The Chinese rubber is typically horrible. As a Sunbeam Tiger owner we get many parts only because a supplier has gone off-shore to have them made. I put new ball joints on and the upper rubber dust covers completely fell apart in a year. This was on a garaged car that had yet to roll down the road. Very disappointing since these ball joints were $90 each in year 2000 dollars.

                          On the other hand I have an old claw foot bathtub I made into a raised garden. Wanting to cover over the valve and spigot holes I simply cut an old inner tube and silicone glued it in place. That was over 25 years ago and it has seen sunlight virtually every one of those days! The rubber is still intact, pliable and shows no signs of cracking. So, it seems rubber can be made durable to the elements.

                          As to cost, you might find rubber in another vehicle that will work. Years ago I had a '65 Plymouth Belvedere HT and the rubber from the old, imported Plymouth Sapporo fit perfectly. I think I paid $3 per door for the rubber from Pick a Part. 3M "yellow death" should hold anything in place.

                          Tom
                          '64 Lark Type, powered by '85 Corvette L-98 (carburetor), 700R4, - CASO to the Max.

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                          • #28
                            You can price all your rubber that you absolutely have to buy from Studebaker International's on line catalog.
                            Originally posted by GThawkwind View Post
                            I figured there was a gasket or seal where the rear fender mounts to the the body even if there was one it could probably be made out of gasket material with relative ease. I need to get a body manual and just go from there, I bet I'll end up needing top order the important stuff. windshield,backlight,quarter windows, door seals, that type of stuff, wonder how much that'll cost.
                            Frank van Doorn
                            Omaha, Ne.
                            1962 GT Hawk 289 4 speed
                            1941 Champion streetrod, R-2 Powered, GM 200-4R trans.
                            1952 V-8 232 Commander State "Starliner" hardtop OD

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