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Anyway around the cost of rubber?

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  • Anyway around the cost of rubber?

    I wanna get the glass back in, and fender properly installed, as soon as possible in starlight. I got a quote from studebaker rubber and stude international. For a full kit ( and that is everything) 665 and 625!!!! Is there any other way to seal my car? I thought about getting the right windscreen, backlight, and window seals. Then using something less proper for the fenders,bumper,ect, but would that be a mistake? Is it worth just to have my car sealed right? Or is there a caso way out? Part me feels like this is something to splurge on and just do right since I want to keep it forever, rather than have my fenders rust out ten years from now because I was a cheap ass when I built it. I plan on this car seeing rain. What do you guys do?

  • #2
    Just bumping before I go to sleep.

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    • #3
      There was this fellow a while back on TV that had a show called THE RED GREEN SHOW. He could fix anything with duct/duck tape. I'd go whole hog and buy the good stuff. Bout 9 bucks a big roll. Should do a car. Hope this helps. jimmijim



      "I approve of this message"
      Last edited by showbizkid; 06-09-2013, 07:16 AM.
      sigpicAnything worth doing deserves your best shot. Do it right the first time. When you're done you will know it. { I'm just the guy who thinks he knows everything, my buddy is the guy who knows everything.} cheers jimmijim*****SDC***** member

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      • #4
        Congratulations on your purchase. I am sure you can do the work but patience is a must. Careful assembly planning is also crucial. I think there is a thread on this.

        I was 15 when I bought my first Studebaker, a 1955 Champion coupe. It was very rusty, and it took some time to replace all of the metal, paint and everything. It took about two years. I still have it over 40 years later. The green 1955 Commander in my avatar was my parts car. I ended up buying a third parts car and fixed up two. Incidentally, the green 1955 bodywork was done in less than two full time weeks over a vacation, then sent to Maaco for a quickie paint job. I sewed the interior myself (it is not perfect), installed the trim, and drive it.

        My advice based on your two postings is to get is mobile ASAP unless you have another car to use as a daily driver. First step is to buy the manuals.

        I have tried used rubber, and have broken a windshield as a result. I recommend new, from a reputable supplier. There are some CASO-approved but incorrect oversized glass gaskets out there that do not work well and can cause considerable installation grief.

        Installing a rear window in a Stude with a wrap around (like yours) is a job for an experienced glass installer + some help, because it is tough to get in the mouldings and take the string out to get the rubber over the metal glass lip of the body + place the glass properly.

        You should be aware that to get a tight fitting headliner, the glass is better left out until done. You may also wish to have the car painted before glass installation. Again, careful planning on the assembly process/steps is required.

        Many here have done their own work on cars. You are in good company and you have our support. Money, enthusiasm and patience will have to be supplied by you.

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        • #5
          Only buy what you need, piece by piece, and make the rest. For example, windshield seals, forward & rear door seals are hard to substitute. But fender-to-body rubbers are easily made out of an old inner-tube. The hood-to-cowl seal is easily substituted also, and can be made to function better than a repro.

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          • #6
            I purchased a complete rubber kit, along with some other stuff and got an additional one-time discount from SI. There were several pieces I didn't need and I sold the excess rubber on ebay for about 2/3 the catalog prices which helped with the overall cost.

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            • #7
              I have no intentions of using used rubber on the windshield or backlight, for those I'll spring for the best.

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              • #8
                Originally posted by GThawkwind View Post
                I have no intentions of using used rubber on the windshield or backlight, for those I'll spring for the best.
                that's the "correct" answer!

                you may want to check Steele Rubber: http://www.steelerubber.com/

                also: http://www.studebakervendors.com/

                and, if you have your "Turning Wheels" issue handy, check the "parts" ads, or the link on the SDC main page for last month's ads. Studebaker Swap site, many more...
                Kerry. SDC Member #A012596W. ENCSDC member.

                '51 Champion Business Coupe - (Tom's Car). Purchased 11/2012.

                '40 Champion. sold 10/11. '63 Avanti R-1384. sold 12/10.

                Comment


                • #9
                  Originally posted by GThawkwind View Post
                  I wanna get the glass back in, and fender properly installed, as soon as possible in starlight. I got a quote from studebaker rubber and stude international. For a full kit ( and that is everything) 665 and 625!!!! Is there any other way to seal my car? I thought about getting the right windscreen, backlight, and window seals. Then using something less proper for the fenders,bumper,ect, but would that be a mistake? Is it worth just to have my car sealed right? Or is there a caso way out? Part me feels like this is something to splurge on and just do right since I want to keep it forever, rather than have my fenders rust out ten years from now because I was a cheap ass when I built it. I plan on this car seeing rain. What do you guys do?

                  Don't scrimp on rubber. However,there are ways to save. If you know the profile of
                  the various rubber seals, you may find it generic, bulk, at far less cost from sources like J C Whitney.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    I have leaky door seals. Because I am planning on having my car repainted hopefully next year, I'm not going to fork out cash for replacing the rubber seals this year. That doesn't make the water coming in when it rains or when I go through a carwash less annoying. For a short term fix, I've seen people patch (not replace whole) door seals with black silicone. I might try that to get me through the next year until I can fork out the cash for body work, paint, and fresh door rubber.

                    As far as windshield glass goes, I agree with everyone else. Good, fresh rubber. Of course, I'd wait till you get closer to the end to get it.
                    '63 Lark Custom, 259 v8, auto, child seat

                    "Your friendly neighborhood Studebaker evangelist"

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                    • #11
                      a good coat of Permatex "Dielectric Tune-up Grease", available at your flaps, may help increase the life of semi-bad weatherstripping for awhile. BTDT - for around doors, etc. not windshields!
                      Kerry. SDC Member #A012596W. ENCSDC member.

                      '51 Champion Business Coupe - (Tom's Car). Purchased 11/2012.

                      '40 Champion. sold 10/11. '63 Avanti R-1384. sold 12/10.

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                      • #12
                        LOL! The CASO bug strikes quick, don't it???

                        Think about it...... you fish around and find something that's kinda-sorta close - maybe at half price if you're lucky. You install it, then paint around it and find it's really not satisfactory. THEN you finally swallow hard and buy the right stuff.
                        And now you've got more invested in seals than you would have if you'd bought the right stuff in the first place. I would agree that there's a few things you can fudge on. But vent window seals - seals around the rear quarter windows - door seals - you can't beat what Studebaker engineered for these.
                        No deceptive flags to prove I'm patriotic - no biblical BS to impress - just ME and Studebakers - as it should be.

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                        • #13
                          For the trunk seal, go to a junk yard and get one from an early 1990s Pontiac. Fits better & seals better than the repro Stude seals. Since it stays in place by gripping the inner, metal lip, it is easily removable & replaceable, without destroying it. I have been using them for years.

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                          • #14
                            Mostly what I worry about is putting the fenders back on for now, Joe you said old inner tube works? What exactly do you mean? I bet I'll have a lot better idea on making my own body rubber once I get a body and chassis manual.

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                            • #15
                              I would also put into perspective the price of parts for a newer, or new car. Most of what we buy for older cars is about 50% less for the same type of thing. I've purchased a mirrour for my Ford, and it was about $120 for a new shiny chrome metal mirrour, where as if I went to say the Subaru dealer and bought the driver's side mirrour, it would probably cost nearly $400 new. But I agree that some of these prices can seem or be outrageous. I would also ask why things like rubber cost so much. Besides the cost of petroleum to make them, fuel doesn't even cost close to the amount. That is unless they're using 5 gal/ft.
                              www.spannerbird.com
                              Coral/Beige 1953 Studebaker Commander Starlight.

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