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  • Opinions on this carving, please

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Name:	1941 Studebaker a carving1.jpg
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ID:	1738882Click image for larger version

Name:	1941 Studebaker a carving2.jpg
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ID:	1738883A local wood carver delivered this to me yesterday. He has seen the actual car, but he worked from photographs. Overall, I think he did a good job, but I'm not too happy about the finish. Also, the grill should have been a little more carefully done. I would like some honest opinions because he would like to do similar carvings of cars for people, and he needs to know what people want and look for in such work. This fellow is in his early forties now, but I had him as a seventh-grade student.
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    Last edited by Sam Ensley; 06-06-2013, 09:31 PM. Reason: Add pictures

  • #2
    He carved this from a block of wood? I'm definitely impressed with it!

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    • #3
      Considering it was hand carved it's pretty good. I imagine you could use a cad-cam milling machine to do a better one, or even one of those 3-d printers.
      John Clements
      Christchurch, New Zealand

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      • #4
        It of course doesn't look like a real car but it has a good rustic look being that its a carving. I agree that the finish (painting)could have been better. I think it could use a bit more finishing in general to be perfect but considing it was once a peice of wood, I'm impressed.

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        • #5
          Way better than I can do. The overall look reminds me of some of the creamic pieces made in the shape of cars. I agree about the grille area. If he wants to sell very many the grille will have to be improved.
          "In the heart of Arkansas."
          Searcy, Arkansas
          1952 Commander 2 door. Really fine 259.
          1952 2R pickup

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          • #6
            Originally posted by Sam Ensley View Post
            [ATTACH=CONFIG]24298[/ATTACH][ATTACH=CONFIG]24299[/ATTACH]A local wood carver delivered this to me yesterday. He has seen the actual car, but he worked from photographs. Overall, I think he did a good job, but I'm not too happy about the finish. Also, the grill should have been a little more carefully done. I would like some honest opinions because he would like to do similar carvings of cars for people, and he needs to know what people want and look for in such work. This fellow is in his early forties now, but I had him as a seventh-grade student.
            [ATTACH=CONFIG]24297[/ATTACH]
            As long as he uses examples of his work in his advertising then he will not be asked to provide more than he can supply skill-wise and should have satisfied customers.

            He should see what the market will bear.

            Bob

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            • #7
              I like it. After all...it is art. Perhaps he could have taken more time and been more meticulous about dimensions, perfections, etc. However, there is a point where perfection, fretting, and invested time become misery. When that happens...why bother?

              If the crap that Picasso produced can bring the big bucks and praise from the snobby "art world"...this deserves an "at ta-boy" at least.
              John Clary
              Greer, SC

              SDC member since 1975

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              • #8
                I think this would come under the heading of "Folk Art" which is not supposed to be a totally accurate rendition of the prototype, but rather the artists rendering of the idea of the original. As such, I would say this is pretty nice. With practice I suspect future renderings would evolve. The more you do the better at it you get.
                I would tell this artist to sign his work and keep at it. Often, the earlier pieces become the most desirable, however, because they point up the artists evolutionary beginnings.
                Nicely done.
                Ed Sallia
                Dundee, OR

                Sol Lucet Omnibus

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                • #9
                  I like it and would be proud to have one of his carvings in my collection.
                  Gary Sanders
                  Nixa, MO

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                  • #10
                    I think that there is a lot of potential in his work, but it all boils down to how dear it is to him (price desired).
                    Gary L.
                    Wappinger, NY

                    SDC member since 1968
                    Studebaker enthusiast much longer

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                    • #11
                      I think Ed Sallia has pretty much nailed it. Signed and dated it retains value but, only if the carver continues to passionately pursue production.
                      "All attempts to 'rise above the issue' are simply an excuse to avoid it profitably." --Dick Gregory

                      Brad Johnson, SDC since 1975, ASC since 1990
                      Pine Grove Mills, Pa.
                      '33 Rockne 10,
                      '51 Commander Starlight,
                      '53 Commander Starlight "Désirée",
                      '56 Sky Hawk

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                      • #12
                        Cool! ...but he ought to give the front more time, grill & lights could scare the life out of any kid or person over 89 years of age...

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                        • #13
                          It started out as a hunk of lumber and now it's a Studebaker....I'm impressed. Can he do the same thing with metal? On a larger scale of course.

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