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1964 R4 Daytona Hardtop

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  • 1964 R4 Daytona Hardtop

    Let's face it......it's a 'minor miracle' that the one '64 'Lark type' R3 (Commander) that Studebaker built is alive and well, and in very good hands. Also, the '64 'Hot Rod Magazine' R3 'Lark type' (Daytona) that Paxton put together also survives and is in great shape........But does anyone out there happen to know the present status of the '64 Daytona R4 HT that Studebaker built? (The Car Life Magazine Car) I don't believe that I've ever heard what happened to THAT car. Does it still exist? (I doubt it) Did it's R4 engine end up with someone and is IT still around? How about the rest of the car? The world wonders, or at least I do!

  • #2
    I think the car still survives but without the original R4. I think it was drag raced for some years.

    Chris.

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    • #3
      Thanks for the input Chris. I figured that responses would be a bit 'thin' on this question......That car seems to have 'fallen off the radar' many years ago!

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      • #4
        Studebaker probably 'goofed' when it made the R4 engine option available. An expensive option, it was advertised as producing LESS horsepower than the first Avanti engine option. (The R2) A 'REAL' R4 has approx 12:1
        compression ratio, requiring the highest octane leaded gasoline that could be found (back when one could find it) and got around 8-12 MPG. The supposed reason the R4 engine was offered was that a buyer couldn't order air conditioning and a supercharger together, but I've always felt that the real reason this engine was offered was the general reluctance from the public to purchase a car with a 'finicky' supercharger on it.
        Anyway, with modern compact A/C compressors available,....an owner CAN have the supercharged AND air conditioned car He'd like to have been able to order in 1964! I can't quite see why anyone today would put the time and money into building a 'TRUE' Studebaker Avanti R4 engine....other than the eyeball appeal of the ALWAYS cool looking Dual Quad Carbs!!
        Last edited by SN-60; 06-01-2013, 11:09 AM. Reason: spelling!

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        • #5
          I think what we've seen with the Plain Brown Wrapper on the chassis dyno is that 'rated' horsepower and real horsepower were two different things. I doubt that R4 HP was less than an R2.
          Tom - Bradenton, FL

          1964 Studebaker Daytona - 289 4V, 4-Speed (Cost To Date: $2514.10)
          1964 Studebaker Commander - 170 1V, 3-Speed w/OD

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          • #6
            Originally posted by Swifster View Post
            I think what we've seen with the Plain Brown Wrapper on the chassis dyno is that 'rated' horsepower and real horsepower were two different things. I doubt that R4 HP was less than an R2.
            I agree................But are You sure that the buying public knew that in 1964? Also ...high compression, hot cammed, dual quad engines of ANY make don't perform all that well if not constantly tuned (Mid-sixties Chrysler 426 for example)......In '64, a good running R2 would no doubt 'Run Away' from a sloppy R4!!!! No, the R4 engine really wasn't the answer......Then or Now.

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            • #7
              It's hard to judge. R3's and R4's were never made in enough quanties to make a judgement. And the ones that have survived certainly aren't being driven enough to make any assumptions. Remember, Sunoco 260 was cheap and plentiful.
              Tom - Bradenton, FL

              1964 Studebaker Daytona - 289 4V, 4-Speed (Cost To Date: $2514.10)
              1964 Studebaker Commander - 170 1V, 3-Speed w/OD

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              • #8
                Originally posted by Swifster View Post
                It's hard to judge. R3's and R4's were never made in enough quanties to make a judgement. And the ones that have survived certainly aren't being driven enough to make any assumptions. Remember, Sunoco 260 was cheap and plentiful.
                Let Me put it this way.......If Paxton dedicated ALL their production to the R3 engine, meaning that the few R4's that they did produce would also have been built as R3's, We'd ALL be better off today! (There would be a few more R3's around!)

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by SN-60 View Post
                  I agree................But are You sure that the buying public knew that in 1964? Also ...high compression, hot cammed, dual quad engines of ANY make don't perform all that well if not constantly tuned (Mid-sixties Chrysler 426 for example)......In '64, a good running R2 would no doubt 'Run Away' from a sloppy R4!!!! No, the R4 engine really wasn't the answer......Then or Now.
                  And the irony today is that all gas motors sold in the USA have port fuel injection---------which is essentially the equivalent of 2 four barrels atop a V8 for example.
                  --------------------------------------

                  Sold my 1962; Studeless at the moment

                  Borrowed Bams50's sigline here:

                  "Do they all not, by mere virtue of having survived as relics of a bygone era, amass a level of respect perhaps not accorded to them when they were new?"

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                  • #10
                    If I remember correctly, the only R4 car built in South Bend was a 1964 Daytona Convertible.



                    Bill

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                    • #11
                      Originally posted by billslark View Post
                      If I remember correctly, the only R4 car built in South Bend was a 1964 Daytona Converti

                      Bill
                      Nope.....'64 Daytona Hardtop

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                      • #12
                        In the early mid '60's there was an R 4 convertible four speed that ran at the US Nationals. He was from Ohio but I don't remember his name. The car did not run real well but he said he had not done anything to it to tune it, etc.

                        Ted

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                        • #13
                          Probably an engine swap Ted, or possibly the Paxton assembled Bonneville car? Anyway, I'd say that fellow was behind the eight-ball draging a heavy convertible.

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                          • #14
                            The original R4 Daytona HT still exists. The owner does not wish to be known. A friend bought the car from Paxton in 1965. Paxton had replaced the R4/4-speed with an R3/Powershift. He drove it that way for several years, sold the car not realizing what he had, and then lost track of it. The current owner got it several decades ago, removed the R3 for another project and it currently has a 289 in it. I don't believe it has been driven for decades and while it's in one piece, it's not in great shape.

                            Yes, it's a shame...'wish the owner would restore it properly or sell it to someone who would. (Not me...I have enough to do!)

                            George



                            George
                            george krem

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                            • #15
                              Thanks George.......That pretty much tells Me "The Rest Of The Story" about the one and only '64 Daytona 'Factory' R4 Hardtop!

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