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  • Interesting Whatoff Toter

    I just saw this brochure on e-Bay and while I am familiar with the conversions that Vernon Whatoff did to factory trucks, I am not familiar with this. It appears he took a Studebaker chassis and running gear and then attached a tilt cab to it.


    Anyone ever seen this before?


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  • #2
    Interesting, Guido. Many years ago, I lived in Ames, Iowa. At that time, Dale Borron Motors on Lincoln Way was a Dodge dealer that had previously been owned by the Whatoff family. I do think that they had had the Studebaker franchise in the same location before that. See, Whatoffs' son used to come into our small body shop, and have some work done(cheap!) on used cars that he bought to sell, and I recollect that he drove Studebaker Wagonaire once in awhile. I also remember repainting a "Toter", that was based on a Dodge chassis. It wasn't really a fun project--we just needed the work. I also worked for awhile at a company there on East New Highway 30 that refurbished beverage trucks, called: "Beer Trucks USA". Not kidding, either. Years before, it had been the production shop for the Whatoff Toter Mobile home transporters.

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    • #3
      Interesting, Guido. Many years ago, I lived in Ames, Iowa. At that time, Dale Borron Motors on Lincoln Way was a Dodge dealer that had previously been owned by the Whatoff family. I do think that they had had the Studebaker franchise in the same location before that. See, Whatoffs' son used to come into our small body shop, and have some work done(cheap!) on used cars that he bought to sell, and I recollect that he drove Studebaker Wagonaire once in awhile. I also remember repainting a "Toter", that was based on a Dodge chassis. It wasn't really a fun project--we just needed the work. I also worked for awhile at a company there on East New Highway 30 that refurbished beverage trucks, called: "Beer Trucks USA". Not kidding, either. Years before, it had been the production shop for the Whatoff Toter Mobile home transporters.

      Comment


      • #4
        quote:Originally posted by Guido

        I just saw this brochure on e-Bay and while I am familiar with the conversions that Vernon Whatoff did to factory trucks, I am not familiar with this. It appears he took a Studebaker chassis and running gear and then attached a tilt cab to it.


        Anyone ever seen this before?


        *********************************************************************

        Gary; this truck appears to be equipped with a modified 'Sightliner' cab from an ACO model International truck on a Studebaker chassis. The IH 'Sightliner' cabs were built from 1957 through 1962 when the ACO was replaced by the DCO models which featured the popular 'Emeryville' cabs. Whattoff experimented with all kinds of configurations. Wouldn't it be great to go to a Studebaker meet and see one of these on the truck line!!!! Wow.

        Frank Drumheller
        Louisa, VA
        '60 Lark Regal VI 4 door sedan
        '48 M16-52 Studebaker/Boyer fire truck

        Comment


        • #5
          quote:Originally posted by Guido

          I just saw this brochure on e-Bay and while I am familiar with the conversions that Vernon Whatoff did to factory trucks, I am not familiar with this. It appears he took a Studebaker chassis and running gear and then attached a tilt cab to it.


          Anyone ever seen this before?


          *********************************************************************

          Gary; this truck appears to be equipped with a modified 'Sightliner' cab from an ACO model International truck on a Studebaker chassis. The IH 'Sightliner' cabs were built from 1957 through 1962 when the ACO was replaced by the DCO models which featured the popular 'Emeryville' cabs. Whattoff experimented with all kinds of configurations. Wouldn't it be great to go to a Studebaker meet and see one of these on the truck line!!!! Wow.

          Frank Drumheller
          Louisa, VA
          '60 Lark Regal VI 4 door sedan
          '48 M16-52 Studebaker/Boyer fire truck

          Comment


          • #6
            "8 feet bumper to ball"...

            HOLY COW! Better not hit the brakes too quick, or you'll end up on your face!![:0]

            Still, it'd be fun to take around the block[8D]

            Robert (Bob) Andrews Owner- IoMT (Island of Misfit Toys!)
            Parish, central NY 13131
            http://www.cardomain.com/ride/2358680/1

            Comment


            • #7
              "8 feet bumper to ball"...

              HOLY COW! Better not hit the brakes too quick, or you'll end up on your face!![:0]

              Still, it'd be fun to take around the block[8D]

              Robert (Bob) Andrews Owner- IoMT (Island of Misfit Toys!)
              Parish, central NY 13131
              http://www.cardomain.com/ride/2358680/1

              Comment


              • #8
                Dont think I would enjoy driving something like that in a rainstorm
                Mono mind in a stereo world

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                • #9
                  Dont think I would enjoy driving something like that in a rainstorm
                  Mono mind in a stereo world

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Yah,8 foot IS a short-short, I'll grant you. But, the forklift-like short wheelbase was for the purpose of improved manueverablility, a benefit realized in setting up mobile homes. I would doubt if any of them ever reached much more than 45mph on the open highway, and were accompanied by wide-load escorts on both ends.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Yah,8 foot IS a short-short, I'll grant you. But, the forklift-like short wheelbase was for the purpose of improved manueverablility, a benefit realized in setting up mobile homes. I would doubt if any of them ever reached much more than 45mph on the open highway, and were accompanied by wide-load escorts on both ends.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        I always thought the purpose of the extreme shortness was b/c of max. total length allowable on the roads... shorter tow rig equals ability to tow longer loads...

                        Yes/no?

                        Robert (Bob) Andrews Owner- IoMT (Island of Misfit Toys!)
                        Parish, central NY 13131
                        http://www.cardomain.com/ride/2358680/1

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          I always thought the purpose of the extreme shortness was b/c of max. total length allowable on the roads... shorter tow rig equals ability to tow longer loads...

                          Yes/no?

                          Robert (Bob) Andrews Owner- IoMT (Island of Misfit Toys!)
                          Parish, central NY 13131
                          http://www.cardomain.com/ride/2358680/1

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Yes, there were limits on the length of loads, thus the trailer toter and the 96 BBC tractors.


                            Join me in removing narcissists, trolls, self annoited "experts" and general idiots via the Ignore button.

                            The official SDC Forum heel nipper ���

                            �Middle age is when your broad mind and narrow waist begin to change places.� E. Joseph Cossman

                            For every mile of road, there are 2 miles of ditch. ���

                            "All lies matter - fight the kleptocracy"

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Yes, there were limits on the length of loads, thus the trailer toter and the 96 BBC tractors.


                              Join me in removing narcissists, trolls, self annoited "experts" and general idiots via the Ignore button.

                              The official SDC Forum heel nipper ���

                              �Middle age is when your broad mind and narrow waist begin to change places.� E. Joseph Cossman

                              For every mile of road, there are 2 miles of ditch. ���

                              "All lies matter - fight the kleptocracy"

                              Comment

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