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Super-Cool Packard factory then & now stills

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  • Super-Cool Packard factory then & now stills

    Many people have produced "then & now" comparisons of the Packard Plant in Detroit, but this presentation is by far the best and most intriguing one yet. Absolutely great. Thanks to Jerry Kaiser for the "send." BP

    Open the link and place your cursor on the extreme side of each photograph. Gradually move your cursor (don't press or click anything, just move your whole mouse) from one side of the photo to the other and the photo will gradually fade from then to now (or now to then, depending on which side of the photo you began.)

    Quite an effort. Text at the opening tells how it was done. Cool beans:

    http://www.freep.com/article/2012120...ext%7cSPORTS06
    We've got to quit saying, "How stupid can you be?" Too many people are taking it as a challenge.

    Ayn Rand:
    "You can avoid reality, but you cannot avoid the consequences of avoiding reality."

    G. K. Chesterton: This triangle of truisms, of father, mother, and child, cannot be destroyed; it can only destroy those civilizations which disregard it.

  • #2
    Thanks for posting.

    Comment


    • #3
      wish people would have taken better care of everything. its a shame to see everything destroyed....

      Comment


      • #4
        These are really great Bob, thanks! What I could never understand is why they didn't continue to use the Packard plant, transfer all Studebaker production there & keep South Bend for stamping & fabrication. Perhaps keep truck production there too. That would have eliminated the fiasco of Conner Avenue & the production problems, quality control & the many other issues that came about. The merger with Studebaker could have worked.
        59 Lark wagon, now V-8, H.D. auto!
        60 Lark convertible V-8 auto
        61 Champ 1/2 ton 4 speed
        62 Champ 3/4 ton 5 speed o/drive
        62 Champ 3/4 ton auto
        62 Daytona convertible V-8 4 speed & 62 Cruiser, auto.
        63 G.T. Hawk R-2,4 speed
        63 Avanti (2) R-1 auto
        64 Zip Van
        66 Daytona Sport Sedan(327)V-8 4 speed
        66 Cruiser V-8 auto

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        • #5
          Seeing the plant in such sad shape is depressing, and yet I could look into those photos for hours.
          Chris Dresbach

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          • #6
            Originally posted by Chris_Dresbach View Post
            Seeing the plant in such sad shape is depressing, and yet I could look into those photos for hours.
            I feel the same way Chris. So much to be seen in the earlier pictures.
            Joe Roberts
            '61 R1 Champ
            '65 Cruiser
            Eastern North Carolina Chapter

            Comment


            • #7
              Depressing as it may be it is reality. I can't thank BP enough for posting them. They are a great way to compare before and after.

              Bob

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              • #8
                Originally posted by Chris_Dresbach View Post
                Seeing the plant in such sad shape is depressing, and yet I could look into those photos for hours.
                True, Chris; 'glad everyone enjoyed them.

                As one who had the privilege of "touring" most Studebaker building relics before they were demolished, I would encourage everyone possible to go see The Packard Plant before it meets the same fate.

                But be careful: I explored The Packard Site with friends, one of whom was legally "carrying," in the summer of 2012. It is indeed more dangerous as to current occupants and -ahem- "activities" than the Studebaker complex ever was. BP
                We've got to quit saying, "How stupid can you be?" Too many people are taking it as a challenge.

                Ayn Rand:
                "You can avoid reality, but you cannot avoid the consequences of avoiding reality."

                G. K. Chesterton: This triangle of truisms, of father, mother, and child, cannot be destroyed; it can only destroy those civilizations which disregard it.

                Comment


                • #9
                  Thanks Bob. The presentation was very interesting.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Very neat, thanks! I'll have to forward this to a friend, I'm sure he'll like it.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      I have to wonder if there aren't enough photos of various Studebaker facilities that something like this couldn't be done like this.
                      No deceptive flags to prove I'm patriotic - no biblical BS to impress - just ME and Studebakers - as it should be.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        BP, are you, by chance, aware of any factory photos of South Bend right after it closed?
                        No deceptive flags to prove I'm patriotic - no biblical BS to impress - just ME and Studebakers - as it should be.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Originally posted by Roscomacaw View Post
                          BP, are you, by chance, aware of any factory photos of South Bend right after it closed?
                          Bob, I personally don't have any, but I'm sure the archives of The South Bend Tribune would yield many if someone wanted to access them. (Generally speaking, I always thought "The Trib" gave Studebaker a fair shake...and well they should have, of course!) BP

                          We've got to quit saying, "How stupid can you be?" Too many people are taking it as a challenge.

                          Ayn Rand:
                          "You can avoid reality, but you cannot avoid the consequences of avoiding reality."

                          G. K. Chesterton: This triangle of truisms, of father, mother, and child, cannot be destroyed; it can only destroy those civilizations which disregard it.

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Originally posted by BobPalma View Post
                            True, Chris; 'glad everyone enjoyed them.

                            As one who had the privilege of "touring" most Studebaker building relics before they were demolished, I would encourage everyone possible to go see The Packard Plant before it meets the same fate.

                            But be careful: I explored The Packard Site with friends, one of whom was legally "carrying," in the summer of 2012. It is indeed more dangerous as to current occupants and -ahem- "activities" than the Studebaker complex ever was. BP
                            Thanks, Bob!

                            First, I'll have to see if my company provided "Out-of-Country" medical coverage includes industrial site visits in what is possibly America's most dangerous city.

                            Craig

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Great link, Bob. In Utica, MI, at the corner of Van Dyke & 22 Mile Rd. once was another Packard proving grounds. At least that's what I was told back in 1968. It was surrounded by an impressive stone wall & the old entrance was through equally imposing gates surrounded by stone. Late at night you could see headlights of cars circling the track. By then I believe Ford owned the property.

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