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1963 R2 Lark "The Whistler"

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  • #91
    Ah more pictures..


    Note: Racing Photos Courtesy of JR Bloom. Please do not redistribute.

    This picture was taken in Nov. 1963. First note.. Its now called "The Whistler."

    Notice both drivers.. Its like they are hugging the steering wheel so they can probably shift better.. or maybe some rule to lurch forward for safety..

    Who knows..

    This is Bob's original post picture.


    The Impala and the Whistler had sporty white wall tires on the rear, while the 60 has them on the front. I guess the 60 Lark didn't get the memo..


    But no one noticed a sticker on the instrument panel at the beginning of the post, so I'll make a comment on it..


    it said, "Don't be caught dead sitting on your seat belt"

    Was this a message from ADOT (Az Dept Of Transportation)?
    No.. I do not think so..

    More likely if you got caught not wearing your seat belt on the track, you were disqualified..
    Last edited by SScopelli; 04-11-2019, 07:46 AM.

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    • #92
      As for the whitewalls on the rear only. I'm betting they were "Atlas Bucron" tires that were known for the being sticky and were used by many stock class racers at the time.
      mrbobinc

      Comment


      • #93
        John, looks like Lorilee did you right for Christmas!!!
        Mike Lynch
        Sunnyslope, AZ

        "Be kind and civil. Allow that you may be mistaken; allow that others will make mistakes, be gracious. If you're going to contribute, try to make it worthwhile."
        Alan Taylor

        Comment


        • #94
          The 60 Lark hardtop is only 3/4 a car length behind at the finish. Not bad for a 259. The 62 Impala is showing the same gap. It is a 283 or 327? Looks like a GT Hawk is parked near the pole at the end.
          Start and Stage Your Studebakers

          Comment


          • #95
            What Bob Caser said in Post #92; 'prolly so.

            Tom (Post #94). I am sure these photos were both taken near the starting line, not finish line. Rarely are there bleachers and that many people parked at any drag strip's finish line. Near the starting line, the little '59 Lark could have been that close to The Whistler during the first 60-180 feet.

            The photos were undoubtedly taken the same day, as evidenced by the Dodge pickup truck parked up to the spectator fence.

            I don't profess to know the AHRA classifications de jour, but I'm betting the 1962 Impala is a 327. See the letter to me from Roy Mendenhall in the very first post that opened this thread. Roy says the Chevy (he writes Chevie!) is running A/S. I can't imagine a 283 running A/S in any sanctioning body.

            Further, examining the original photo here with a magnifying glass clearly shows the checkered flags of a 327 emblem on the front fender, rather than the simple, unadorned "V" of a 283.

            Great photo, Seb; 'keep 'em coming! BP
            We've got to quit saying, "How stupid can you be?" Too many people are taking it as a challenge.

            Ayn Rand:
            "You can avoid reality, but you cannot avoid the consequences of avoiding reality."

            G. K. Chesterton: This triangle of truisms, of father, mother, and child, cannot be destroyed; it can only destroy those civilizations which disregard it.

            Comment


            • #96
              Years ago I had 60s Hot Rod Mags, and I swear this picture was shown. as I remember the writing on the front fender,I don't have them any more so I can't check.
              Originally posted by SScopelli View Post
              I'd like to point out something that has fascinated me since this thread began.

              This thread is not only about "The Whistler", but something more.

              Sure it was exciting to see the car removed from its ominous burial in the desert, but only because it had the telltale signs of it being a real "R" car. Until it was truly out in the open, only then could one see the worn off markings and the ghost it left behind in the paint, that this was a race car as well.

              But lets go back to the end of 1963, when a young man named Bob Palma, took a clipping from a race magazine and wrote to the car dealer that was sponsoring a 63 "Blown" Lark drag car. The only reason he was able to write to "Ray Tanner Motor's" (some 1700 miles away) was because he searched out back issues of Studebaker news for the dealer's address.

              What the..?

              In today's age, we can do a Google search and have information like that at our fingertips in milliseconds. But in 1963?



              Most grownups during 1963 didn't find much interest in life past the end of Main street in their own town, let alone an 18 year old during that time.

              If you're not familiar with Bob Palma's letter to Tanner Motor's and the response Bob got back from Tanner Motor's, you can read it again by clicking on the post link below. You can hit the back button when you're done..



              You might also want to note, that the picture Mr. Palma clipped out of his magazine, and the gloss photo that was returned, had some interesting updates between them. The one Bob clipped out looked like a fairly new car with stock disc brake rims, and had white shoe polish writing on the doors and fenders. Also note, no mention of being called "The Whistler."

              This picture was taken in October of 1963, by J.R. Bloom while it was racing at "Bee Line" Drag Strip in Scottsdale Arizona, and note, No name..



              The Stickers with the Cross-hair on them is an Autolite sparkplugs one. The oval shaped one at the bottom of the window, second from the right is the Bee Line sticker..






              Yes, Full RACE.. It was a 300 degrees duration and .505" lift. Also the end of the Cam was stamped, "Hard Face" which may have been an indication that it was welded back up to regrind at the high lift. This cam would only be suited for short high reves like a drag race, opposed to stop and go traffic.

              if you were to "Drive" this cam, it would seem like the car had no power.. That is because street driving is from 1k-3k RPM. This cam is for performance at the 4k-7K rpm range, especially at the end of the 1/4 mile where your RPMs are expected to be at max.

              If you hit MAX RPMs from your engine at the end, it means you left noting behind.

              3,685.. Wow.
              Joseph R. Zeiger

              Comment


              • #97
                Originally posted by Bob Caser View Post
                As for the whitewalls on the rear only. I'm betting they were "Atlas Bucron" tires that were known for the being sticky and were used by many stock class racers at the time.
                Not likely, the flat sidewalls and square shoulders tell me those are Casler or M&H Racing Slicks, a little pricey, just about all Tire stores sold Retread copies for the CASO's, the Whistler and the Impala opted for the "Top of line" Whitewalls.

                The stickiest Street Tires were the Atlas or Goodyear Butyl, those were like bubble Gum or erasers, I still have a set of 1963 Goodyears still on the original '56 Power Hawk wheels I put them on in 1963 they're on my (Dad's) '56 Hawk that he sold New.
                I wonder if they still have 1963 low smog L.A. Air in them?


                As far as I know we never had to run Street Tires at AHRA or NHRA Strips.
                I guess the Muscle Car Drags are the only ones that do that for a reason.
                StudeRich
                Second Generation Stude Driver,
                Proud '54 Starliner Owner

                Comment


                • #98
                  Originally posted by BobPalma View Post
                  What Bob Caser said in Post #92; 'prolly so.

                  Tom (Post #94). I am sure these photos were both taken near the starting line, not finish line. Rarely are there bleachers and that many people parked at any drag strip's finish line. Near the starting line, the little '59 Lark could have been that close to The Whistler during the first 60-180 feet.

                  The photos were undoubtedly taken the same day, as evidenced by the Dodge pickup truck parked up to the spectator fence.

                  I don't profess to know the AHRA classifications de jour, but I'm betting the 1962 Impala is a 327. See the letter to me from Roy Mendenhall in the very first post that opened this thread. Roy says the Chevy (he writes Chevie!) is running A/S. I can't imagine a 283 running A/S in any sanctioning body.

                  Further, examining the original photo here with a magnifying glass clearly shows the checkered flags of a 327 emblem on the front fender, rather than the simple, unadorned "V" of a 283.

                  Great photo, Seb; 'keep 'em coming! BP
                  This photo might help show that the photos were taken close to the start line as the guy in the middle with the jacket is at the staging line. And the Bee Line Banner is in both shots.



                  I also agree the race between the 60 Lark and the Impala were on the same day as proved by this die hard fan in the black shirt..



                  Last edited by SScopelli; 07-27-2017, 08:06 AM.

                  Comment


                  • #99
                    Originally posted by 63t-cab View Post
                    Years ago I had 60s Hot Rod Mags, and I swear this picture was shown. as I remember the writing on the front fender,I don't have them any more so I can't check.
                    Joe, I've long thought I remembered this photo being clipped from the old CARS magazine, but have never been able to find a copy, or any other documentation, so I may have clipped it from another magazine.

                    If it helps you remember where you saw it, I can tell you that the original clipping is on cheap, pulp-like, off-color newsprint, not the slicker, higher-quality paper used by Petersen Publishing in magazines such as Hot Rod. I have many period copies of Hot Rod from the early 1960s, and the paper they used was much better than the low-quality pulp on which that first Whistler photograph is printed.

                    I rarely see CARS magazines at Swap Meets, but when I do, I look through as many as I can, trying to find the copy in which I think The Whistler photo appeared. So far, no luck. BP
                    We've got to quit saying, "How stupid can you be?" Too many people are taking it as a challenge.

                    Ayn Rand:
                    "You can avoid reality, but you cannot avoid the consequences of avoiding reality."

                    G. K. Chesterton: This triangle of truisms, of father, mother, and child, cannot be destroyed; it can only destroy those civilizations which disregard it.

                    Comment


                    • Originally posted by StudeRich View Post
                      Not likely, the flat sidewalls and square shoulders tell me those are Casler or M&H Racing Slicks, a little pricey, just about all Tire stores sold Retread copies for the CASO's, the Whistler and the Impala opted for the "Top of line" Whitewalls.
                      Upon further review, Rich, I tend to agree with your assessment. BP

                      We've got to quit saying, "How stupid can you be?" Too many people are taking it as a challenge.

                      Ayn Rand:
                      "You can avoid reality, but you cannot avoid the consequences of avoiding reality."

                      G. K. Chesterton: This triangle of truisms, of father, mother, and child, cannot be destroyed; it can only destroy those civilizations which disregard it.

                      Comment


                      • This is indeed a great thread. Some of the pictures here are also at the H.A.M.B.'s "NHRA Junior Stock" thread. It is a long one but if you are persistent you will find several Studebaker pictures. http://www.jalopyjournal.com/forum/s...a+junior+stock
                        Joe Roberts
                        '61 R1 Champ
                        '65 Cruiser
                        Eastern North Carolina Chapter

                        Comment


                        • Originally posted by BobPalma View Post
                          Upon further review, Rich, I tend to agree with your assessment. BP

                          There are several photos showing the "Whistler" in it's heyday. I am still of the opinion that the photo of it racing the 62 Chevy they are both running passenger tires. Casler slicks at the time were recaps and the supply of the new narrow whitewalls would have been limited for their production at the time.
                          I can do further diligence to find out when "cheater slicks " were alllowed in stock class racing. Beeline Raceway was a AHRA sanctioned track and had different rules than NHRA requirements. Attached are some photos of Atlas Bucron tires the choice of street racers of the time.
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                          mrbobinc

                          Comment


                          • Originally posted by Bob Caser View Post
                            There are several photos showing the "Whistler" in it's heyday. I am still of the opinion that the photo of it racing the 62 Chevy they are both running passenger tires. Casler slicks at the time were recaps and the supply of the new narrow whitewalls would have been limited for their production at the time.
                            I can do further diligence to find out when "cheater slicks " were alllowed in stock class racing. Beeline Raceway was a AHRA sanctioned track and had different rules than NHRA requirements. Attached are some photos of Atlas Bucron tires the choice of street racers of the time.
                            Good point, too, Bob; they were indeed the choice for the street. I remember handling those Bucrons in the course of working in a busy, full-service gas station, and they were soft and sticky.

                            Let us know what you're able to find out about cheater slicks at AHRA strips circa 1963. Thanks. BP
                            We've got to quit saying, "How stupid can you be?" Too many people are taking it as a challenge.

                            Ayn Rand:
                            "You can avoid reality, but you cannot avoid the consequences of avoiding reality."

                            G. K. Chesterton: This triangle of truisms, of father, mother, and child, cannot be destroyed; it can only destroy those civilizations which disregard it.

                            Comment


                            • !
                              Lets say there will be no question as to which end of the track this picture was taken


                              Note: Racing Photos Courtesy of JR Bloom. Please do not redistribute.

                              Note the single collector drag pipe under the car. It was noted that there may have been trickery in how it was configured to help suck the exhaust out for that extra bit of power. Could it have made the noise that sounded like Whistle at high RPMs?

                              I posed this question in another thread, but it just died.

                              "How would you restore The Whistler?"

                              Ted's Tomato looks like a stock Studebaker that came off the deal's floor. Awesome!

                              The Whistler on the other hand was rode hard and put away wet.

                              If I were to guess, after one year it started racing it was looking like a car that not even the best refrigerator salesman in Alaska could sell.

                              * Field modification done with a can opener (Dull one at that).
                              * Banged up floor board from when the drive shaft twisted like a candy-cane until it came out of the transmission and beat the underside.

                              A race car oozing with character to some just not everyone's taste.

                              Look at it's picture. A single collector for the drag pipe under the right center of the car. Tubes bent everywhere coming from both sides of the car to that collector.

                              Square tubing traction bars welded from the rear axle spring plate to the frame, similar to the Tempest in Bob's post.

                              But not streetable..

                              I'm looking for honest opinions along the lines of
                              "Bone stock from the factory", to
                              "Patch it up and make it run ugly!"


                              5,005
                              Last edited by SScopelli; 04-11-2019, 07:44 AM.

                              Comment


                              • Originally posted by SScopelli View Post
                                !

                                I'm looking for honest opinions along the lines of
                                "Bone stock from the factory", to
                                "Patch it up and make it run ugly!"


                                5,005
                                ...well since you asked, I'd be patching it up and running it ugly simply because the probability of doing a frame off restoration back to the height of it's heyday is a bucks-up and time consuming process, plus one would need a lot more documention to get every detail correct...patching it up on the other hand requires a little more free artistic, or should I say 'historical' licence, and a lot less money. Once running and rough, then you could restore to the level you see fit, and as your pocketbook allows you. I think restoring it to factory fresh is missing the point...pure stock, or what ever you wish to call it is not what this car is, or was all about. Bottom line, IMO, doing something with this car is far better than doing nothing. cheers, junior.
                                sigpic
                                1954 C5 Hamilton car.

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